David Fixler, Einhorn Haffe Architect

Article by David Fixler, Principal of Einhorn Yaffee Prescott Architecture & Engineering P.C.

Preparing for Practice:


1. Specialized programs are typically both responses to the practical needs of the market and ways in which to influence design and market trends. This trend is likely to continue and to encourage greater specialization, but I believe that there is a core body of knowledge with which every advanced design professional needs to be conversant in order to successfully manage and design complex projects. It will become increasingly necessary, however, for all but a rarified few designers at the top of the profession to develop one or more particular specialties.


2. Since the separation of architecture and engineering at the end of the 18th century, the nature of the profession has become continuously more fragmented and diversified. There is no doubt that we continue to have a residual attitude toward the architect as the Master Builder, the person who is ultimately responsible for the artistic, intellectual and technical content of a project, whether or not this competency is appropriately still placed in one individual. Ideally, specialization should only be pursued over the foundation of a strong general background, as it is extremely difficult to conceive and execute good architecture without a strong initial vision that can be carried through the phases and processes necessary to get a building built. This vision can only come from someone or group of people who can see and understand the large picture from start to finish.


3. Yes, specialization creates niche markets and specialties which individuals can focus upon in order to distinguish themselves, and there is no doubt the desire for niche recognition constantly creates new areas of specialization.


Practice:


1. The generalist still exits, but the successful generalist usually gravitates to specialized niches based upon completed work. The exception again is the ‘Starchitect’ – though even they have really just become specialists in one type or another of design. In competing for quality institutional, government or commercial work, what often wins the day is an office that can demonstrate specialized competencies in a culture that understands the continued needs for an overarching generalist approach.


2. This is the most interesting and provocative of your questions. Many argue that architecture, as cultural production has been sidelined since the advent of the industrial revolution, and that this marginalization has become particularly acute in the information age. We must recognize that architecture is transforming, and that the best architecture above the scale of the residence will probably continue to become increasingly specialized. What I think will become more dominant is emphasis on the integration and collaboration of diverse teams of specialists to produce an optimal product. Whether one considers the visionary(ies) of the group specialists in this regard could certainly be argued, but that person or persons will have to be able to bring a broad cultural and intellectual knowledge base to bear in order to sustain and realize such a vision.


3. I think the schools need to do both – to impart the gifted designer with management skills, and the gifted manager with an advanced sense of aesthetics and the nature of design practice. Having said this however, I believe that the continued emphasis on design in academia should remain – there is simply not enough time in practice to devote the kind of concentrated energy necessary to begin to grasp design skills without having a solid bases upon which to draw – design requires immersion. Management is less abstract and more experience based and can consequently be better learned in practice or with supplemental training.
4. I think that the AIA is genuinely concerned with where the architecture market is heading, but I do not sense any strong desire on either the part of architects or clients to legislate specialization – but maybe I’m naïve…..

Olaf Recktenwald - Architecture School Review

Article by Olaf Recktenwald, PhD Candidate at McGill University & former Adjunct Professor of Architecture in the University of Oklahoma


“But let me tell you a little something about your graduates. When they arrive at my office, I have to spend up to six months training them how to draft and how to letter correctly. What are we teaching them if they can’t perform these basic skills?” A recent comment at the gallery exhibition underscores the continual pressure on architecture schools to provide for real-world preparation. Is a good education not one which promotes skill-related problem solving driven by the demands of the workplace? Are such demands not evidenced by how major offices have recently begun to rank schools according to the productivity level of their graduates? Students that have been intent on exploring alternate modes of architectural knowledge and craft beyond those established by professional authorities are often marginalized in such an environment of production. Faced with an elective course, will a student explore “philosophy of Mannerist Architecture” or “Skill in Drawing Management?” If technique appears to be the outcome of the so-called pre-office years, why engage a liberal arts university at all in this process?

The question of current curricula’s ability to address the challenges of specialization cannot be clearly understood by elaborating on the divergence between practice and academia. Applicable in certain areas of science, the separation of theoretical and practical knowledge is not possible within the sphere of humanities. Based on a humanitarian discipline, an architecture studio requires communication and learning at all scales of making and therefore an interaction with architects, designers, and engineers who have those practical skills to offer. Yet it also needs poetic voices that can nurture a cultural and ethical environment in which students can formulate appropriate boundaries with which to work. The richer and more intense that environment, the less likely ideas are to get lost later on in the realm of productivity. Practical skills are to be absorbed over the lifetime of an architect’s career, and are much more efficiently dealt with in practice than in an educational context where the simulation of the theatre of reality is an ineffectual surrogate. Pushed to become a project with research based qualifications, architecture education draws its models more and more from the hard sciences. Swelling suffers defeat to housing, matter to material performance, and the creating of communicative environments to space planning. Hypotheses and frameworks of investigation provide a methodology of approach wherein raw material or ideas are never understood holistically, but inasmuch as they are useful to the objective model brought to bear on them. Conclusive instrumental knowledge becomes prioritized over what might be perceived as being feeling-based, idiosyncratic, or perhaps personal. Yes, at what cost to the material being dealt with, to the process of investigation, and to the concerns of the human beings involved in the creative act does such research come? Coming to the table with a pre-defined project in search of a definitive conclusion is much like seeing the world through a perspective drawing – the reality beyond is manipulated so as to be coherent, accessible, and even useful. As evident in the drawing technique, interpretations cannot masquerade as truths. Regardless of the strength of the description, the full richness of the world cannot be exhausted by any one perspective. Must such an objectifying move the thought of in opposition to the sensuous reality and the temporal conditions that got one there? If such thought takes us beyond us, must it do so at our own expense? What would it take to transcend without relinquishing the journey through material? In the middle ages, something got in the way of our experience of matter qua matter – namely significance. Matter was not considered to be a blank receptacle for external “research” projections, but came with its meaning already in place. Just as in the case of perspective, no projective techniques can lay claim to the concrete reality of real space. In subjugating the uniqueness of human creativity to a universal condition, the explicit advantage of an instrumental thought process becomes a clear disadvantage in the context of human-based architectural space. Only on a level of abstraction, where in the original situational nature of the world is translated into a system, does such an approach appear useful.

Current architectural education focuses almost exclusively on applicable technical subjects, while most of these matters are firmly in the hands of those better equipped to handle them. Surely architects should be home in such an environment, but they don’t have to imitate engineers or to claim authority in the subject. There exist concerns and areas of knowledge very specific to architecture, such as its cultural, poetic, and social role, that are seriously underrepresented in current curricula. Architecture education should confront what it is that uniquely presents itself within the discipline in lieu of a more dire understanding of the field as a form of applied engineering. Architecture is fundamentally a human discipline, rooted in practical life and characterized by typical human situations such as dining, walking or reading. That the weakest part of our current academic studies is in humanistic research, presents a significant paradox. Unfortunately, most schools of architecture, due to a lack of apprehension or of fundamental leadership, are in little position to take on such a task. Nevertheless, in many parts of the world there exist environments that continue to nurture an understanding of the unique cultural role of architecture.

Fernando Domeyko - Architecture School Professor

Interview w/ Fernando Domeyko, Professor of Architecture at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology

Fernanco Domeyko is an architect and has also taught architecture around the world, at several universities including MIT, where he served as a professor for several years.

ASR: There is this general mentality in academia that the architect must be a renaissance man and have a generalist education. Why is that? Why is it necessary for the architect to have this broad education?

F. Domeyko: The Renaissance man was a generalist man, a broad man as a human being. The Renaissance men are examples of completeness of men as humans. They touch on poetry, on the sense of infinity and on techniques. They are complete men both from the physical and intellectual perspective. That was the idea of old times men. I think that education is exactly that. Education is a process of thinking, a way to understand and be responsible to society. It is a way to be responsible to other human beings who inhabit our planet which is constantly changing, because of technology, disasters, and tragedies. That is why architects in this super-dynamic constant movement have to be prepared to think always in an innovative way. I believe that a school has to communicate the sense of excellence, the sense of ethics and the sense of aesthetics. These three things have to be part of our education which would then allow us to integrate technologies and other things which are associated with resolving problems.

ASR: You are saying that technique that the architect uses is not necessarily a technique that the architect completely understands? Is it a technique that he uses while trying to achieve something that he has thought of as a generalist?

F. Domeyko: I think we use techniques for many different reasons, certainly not for a linear thinking. To solve problem X I will use technique Y, is a mechanistic approach. Our mind is very free. It can’t be forced to think linearly. We operate in an environment, and for that the school has to be a good place to receive information, learn about new issues and discoveries, explore your interests and prepare your mind to be open. Every time that we face new techniques we have to be able to operate and open our minds to that. That should be a part of our educational and technical preparation.

ASR:Today schools advertise their specialized programs. Do you think that we are currently witnessing a fragmentation of the profession of architecture? The option to get a generalized education is there but students themselves choose not to, because of the needs of the market that requires specialized education?

F. Domeyko: I think that the role of the school is not to advertise new techniques but rather incorporate them with the contemporary thinking. I believe that it is not possible to separate history from ethics, from scientific discoveries, and from philosophical achievements. It is true that techniques open new ways to think, such as this latest parametric way of thinking. Even though today software programs can do open parametric possibilities, that way to think is nothing new since it was investigated by others a long time ago. So, it’s not possible to separate techniques from the way of thinking. They go in parallel but in different speeds. Thinking is in general by far more advanced than available techniques. The problems we constantly discover are by far more dynamic and strong than the extremely primitive techniques we have.
I think the good schools don’t advertise about techniques that much but they advertise about problems and attitudes towards life. If schools produce people who are purely technical and don’t think at all, they are producing technicians and that is the least we want. Schools have to produce professionals, artists or intellectuals. Schools should prepare students intellectually to deal with the physical environment.

ASR: Isn’t a form of dangerous specialization when a student comes into the school lacking basic techniques of the profession that have been there forever and he/she ends up substituting them with new specialized techniques which eventually end up defining student’s thought? In other words, if I can’t draw and I can use a software which contrary to the human mind has some limitations, wouldn’t my thought process be limited by it and wouldn’t that limit myself to a very specialized end product?

F. Domeyko: Yes, what you are saying is absolutely true. Machines in general are serving only certain aspects of the scientific investigation and particularly in architecture they are serving only certain aspects of our process of design while others are not touched. For example, our attitude toward nature, toward human life, toward our own existence as human beings is an important part of the design process which is not taken into account from the machines.
Since this super-rationalistic time doesn’t provide us with answers to the big questions, people start to hesitate about the rationalistic thinking and about process. This certainly does not mean that we deny process, but that other issues such as intuition and the fact of discovery became very important.

People who use software believe that they can generate through it a certain process and they can find and discovery things that they never expected. But the same happens if you start to understand things that you never understood before. Just making things, for example, is another way to produce discoveries. By making certain things you find other things that you never thought that you would find.

In any case, when you enter the discovery process you have to act with intuition and without intention; you have to try to liberate your mind from the intention. I don’t deny the possibility of the software to get there but whatever is the way you took it is an act of consciousness that you understand anything different and new. The mechanism in itself doesn’t resolve the problem, but it eventually can open certain aspects that we never thought of before.

ASR:  Do you think that what drives students to be more specialists is the professional market, since with a specialized degree you have more chances of getting a better job?

F. Domeyko: I know exactly what you are talking about and I think this is completely personal. I believe it is a mistake to think that way. People who believe in that are preparing for the next three years and then after three years they will be replaced by a new generation. I think you should always be critical and distant to techniques or just love them as they are. Do not try to surpass the machine. You cannot ask a software to do more than what it can produce.

ASR: How important do you think experience is for an architect? Does that limit the horizon of young professionals who just stepped out of school?

F. Domeyko: I think that experience does not exist in itself but what exists is the capacity of reaction. The capacity to react in a relative right way to new problems is something very important. There is no achievement in the architectural profession as in any profession. We constantly prove things. I think life is everyday completely new and challenging. We can’t argue that a certain architect is better from somebody else because he/she has experience. What counts is the capacity of reaction to a specific problem. In this case, a young and inexperienced architect might have a better reaction than an experienced architect.

ASR:What you are saying is extremely important, but do you think that the professional market has realized that?

F. Domeyko: I think yes. Architecture is very complicated because you cannot take the risk of millions of dollars with somebody who hasn’t built anything, even if he/she is someone with a good idea. But little by little if that person is able to think correctly and react correctly he/she will achieve something.

ASR: This brings us to another question in terms of legalizing specialization. The market prefers specialized architects, i.e., SOM that might have a department that specifically works on hospitals or labs. If some powerful firms like that end up controlling the AIA wouldn’t there be some sort of federal legislation that would require that person who wants to build a hospital should go to a certified firm? Which means that the younger generalist would not even have the opportunity to react?

F. Domeyko: That is purely a political, bureaucratic and economical problem. It has nothing to do with education or the way to think. Of course, when those big firms achieve certain stability they want to preserve their privileges. The architectural thinking or the architectural attitude is to read and renovate society and not invent it. In that sense, if, for example, SOM has a vision for society today and another architect does not, they are the winner. In recent years I am doing installations with students around the campus. Believe that in fact you can do architecture in the most modest way. You don’t need to make a hospital to make architecture. The majority of hospitals don’t contain any architectural quality. They are completely empty monsters, constructions and not buildings.

I think that today a new way of working is emerging because of the extent of the work, its complexity, because of the possibilities and of the techniques that we have. We can now achieve better results in a much more complementary way. I see collaborations happening between big professional offices, which didn’t exist before.

People say that research has been done on software or in building technology but never in architecture. This is not true. We have been doing research in architecture that we don’t classify as such. I feel that we have to orient school towards interdisciplinary research. Schools are where this can really happen. In their environment there is a very actual and interesting debate between the idea of software as a tool of the architectural thought process and the logic of understanding through senses derived from the bringing concepts to the direct confrontation of the architecture facts, tectonics and phenomenology.

Something else very important is that schools doesn’t finish when you graduate. After graduation you continue to be part of the school which has to extend to your professional life.

ASR: It feels that the architect is not anymore what Frank Lloyd Wright was, a utopian thinker, but the architect nowadays is more of a coordinator.

F. Domeyko: I believe that vision always comes from one person. He/she is the one who will take the pencil and do the job. It is not a common agreement because vision is not a common agreement. In the architectural office people do not vote. Architects just make arguments and find reasons, forms and designs which convince.

ASR: Do you feel that in the corporate architecture the role of someone as the project manager is the replacement of the generalist architect or a necessity for the firm to work?

F. Domeyko: I think that in good firms project managers achieve their positions because they are able to think correctly and make the right decisions.
My advice to students would be to have more faith. Believe me, this is a beautiful profession and it’s always possible to do something successful. You are always in confrontation of problems and must have the desire to discover, think, and challenge new things. There are people who believe that machines will resolve everything, even make the human brain survive. For thirty years, I have been hearing the same discourse: In the future this and that will happen…I don’t believe in looking at the future because it is definitely going to be different that what we predict. So I would put everything in the present. I don’t care if in the future some software will be able to produce my project instead of me. I think what matters will always be humans, ourselves, not the machines, not the techniques!

architecture school portfolio

Interview w/ Percy Griffin, Professor of Architecture at NYIT

Percy Griffin is an Architect in New York and a Professor at the School of Architecture at NYIT.

So, what’s your story ?

I’m an architect … and I was born and raised in the state of Mississippi. I had never had a T-Square till I came to NY. My family were sharecroppers.

In the early part of my education we had to walk three miles to school and three miles back, whereas the whites had busses to ride. We did not have the facilities in our school to give us all we needed, but we made the best we could with what we had.

I graduated from high-school and I was the top of my class, and came to NY.

My mother said that I was born to be an architect even though she didn’t really know what the word meant, because she said that I used to be attracted to drawings and models and building miniatures etc. She said that her son (me) was different from her other sons (4 of us). So, that was the beginning of the idea.

I came to NY and started school, but had to take many remediate courses. That is when I discovered that any African American (back then called a “negro”) who was accepted in any school in this country, Mississippi would pay their tuition and pay for them to travel back and forth twice a year. They didn’t want anybody knowing that of course, so I didn’t know either and no one else knew it either. It was a cover-up for the federal government’s “separate but equal” policies.

There were a lot of people that helped me in the beginning of my career. For example, a lady named Ruth Hersh – an employment agent somewhere in the 50s – called me and told me that Philip Johnson was looking for a worker, and wanted to cross the fence and hire a black (I was one of the first ones that he hired).

I worked for Philip Johnson for 5 years. It was the experience of my life. that was where I was really able to mend the areas that needed to be mended, which was necessary for me to be an architect. I was there for about a month. I went there early spring. As I was looking around, everyone there was either from Princeton, Harvard, University of Tokyo, Yale … the best universities on the planet. So, I’m looking around, and I’m like “I gotta go back to school”! And I became friends with most of the workers. They were very nice to me. So, I spoke with some of them and said that I had to go back to school, and I don’t have the money to do that, and I have to use my money to live and pay the rent, so maybe I could work part-time and go back … “I’m gonna ask Mr Johnson”… “Oh no”, they said, “don’t do that because you are extremely sensitive and he’ll insult you”. Some of the workers wanted to teach, and when they told him, he ran up and got a check, and gave them the check and said “get out of my office”!!! He was a mean man. So, I said to myself after a couple of weeks went by, “well … he’s gonna have to tell me to go”. So, I went up, and I said “Mr Johnson I’d like to go back to school”. He said “Good!” So I said, “yes, but I want to work here part time”… “I DON’T DO THAT!!!”, he said … I said “Thank you sir”… Before I could get to the door he said “STOP!”  And then I turned around he said “but in your case I will make an exception and my office will fit your school’s schedule”. He paid me full pay, the same pay he gave to the architects that had already graduated, for 5 years, and I took off any day that my class was going on, and he never took off a dime. He kept paying me the same he paid everyone else… for five long years. And he also gave me personal crits on my school projects… for five long years! My fellow students at the school would pay no attention to the professors about the assignment. They’d wait for me to come through the door and ask “what did Philip Johnson say about the assignment?” And the teachers would get so upset. That is a true story! At his office I got the chance to meet Louis Kahn, Salvador Dali, Andy Warhol, and others and go to parties with them, because they all knew Philip Johnson and he would invite everyone to the party. I wouldn’t trade that for any school in the entire world: Going to school up at City College, and being in the office of Philip Johnson.

Do you think that just that interaction with Philip Johnson on a daily basis was as critical as a formal architectural education?

Yes,  I do, because architecture is more than sitting in a studio and many of the professors at school were very prejudice. They were not ready to work with and teach an African-American. I think I was blessed and lucky to have been in that office. On top of all of that of course, you needed talent. I would proclaim that I truly had the talent and ability to be an architect.

What do you think it means to have the talent to be an architect?

It means the creativity, the mind to put things together, the mind to be compassionate, the mind to understand the needs of the users, etc. My clients are not rich clients, but they need architecture. Out of a few pennies I can put, I believe, the best they could get to transform their space into an environment that they would enjoy. I feel very confident about that. It has been my goal, my passion and what I do.

Is this ability to improve space what you love the most about architecture?

Yes. I love to help the people that are not rich but need what they need. If they need a home, they should get a home. A home is an investment, so they call upon an architect because the state requires an architect. The joy of having a home to them has nothing to do with architecture, BUT I try to give them all that they can get. And the pleasure when they have a home and it is ready and they walk into it often makes them say things like “we had no idea it would be like this”.

Here is another example:

In my career I have worked on a variety of different structures, from homes, to public buildings, churches to funeral homes. There was this particular funeral home, where the client wanted to add eight more chapels to the ones he already had. He showed me the space and he said, “professor Griffin, I need eight more chapels and you were recommended to me. There are architects here that all they do is do funeral homes, but I would like for you to do it”. There was one single hallway, with six chapels on the one side and six chapels on the other. I said “oh my god, you cannot do this” completely unconsciously and talking to myself. He said “why!”. I said “you cannot have all these chapels next to each other in a straight corridor and everyone having their service together and coming out and they are overcome with grief and then on top of that everybody is experiencing everybody else’s grief! “ I was talking to myself … he said “really ? What would you do?” I said “I would have the corridor go around a round wall, which would create four separate spaces. So, if one was at one end they would never meet someone at the other end of the corridor. And I tell you, we built it like that and it was most successful. EXTREMELY successful! You HAVE to have compassion for others and what you are doing. You have to live it. I have done a lot of daycare centers. I remember once I was working on a daycare center, and I wasn’t sure how the children would react after the space was completed. I went down to the old center and ask the director “could I fill a couple of cars with a few children? I’d like to take them to the new space”. The space came from my mind but I was trying to be a two-year-old. They got in there and went “WOW”. I walked out, tears were in my eyes. Job Well Done!!!! For me, that is what architecture is all about. Meeting the expectation of how the space will be used. It’s not about the money. Everyone needs architecture. The rich need architecture, and the poor need architecture. I work for the Poor! And I enjoy it!

So you feel that architecture has a special social purpose?

Yes, because there is a lot of need for improvement. If you are very lucky and it is something that you really enjoy it is not about work.

I tell youngster when they ask how much money they’ll make and such. “You’ll make a living”, and there are many architects that are very rich, but that’s not all. It’s far from being all. There is a lot in between. You should make a living of course, and the joy of the thing should be to be doing what you love to do, and if you are lucky enough, it will be all you want to do.

Whose vision is more important? Yours, the client’s or the theorist’s?

I try to expedite my client’s vision. That’s more important to me. But, to give them a little bit more than their expectation. They have an idea, they have a need, but in that need to give them a taste of honey is my purpose. If they are spending their money, then they should be able to get the best. As a professional, I would be very displeased if I only gave them what they need.

Is it poetics or function that are more important?

Poetics. It’s the music. Who’s gonna dance by your music! That’s what it is about.

I did a lot of churches. And again, I like to test my work. Once it is completed I like to test it. Not every piece, but to a good extent. I recall renovating this Baptist chapel on 114 street and Lenox Ave. A minister came to me (I am a deacon in the church) and said Deacon Griffin I understand you are an architect, and I need to do some work on the church. I did the work and even the little children when they walked in the chapel they knew that it had transformed into a musical piece. This is a response that I believe we all should seek when we do our work. Do it the best that you can. You will put a lot of time in it, you won’t make a lot of money, but do it the best that you can!

 

Do you think there are limits to what an Architect can do?

You have to know thyself and know the client as well in order to understand what you could do to help the client. You have to think of that because otherwise it can lead to a very sad end.

As an educator, what would you say to young architects?  What is the number one principle to having a successful architectural career?

I would think the first priority would be to make sure to know that this is what you want to do. It is very unfortunate if you don’t find out in an early stage. Architecture is not a picnic. You have to discipline yourself to count sand in the desert in a thousand degrees. You also need a family, and they must understand that you love what you do and allow you to do it.

Young architects tend to value awards more than actual accomplishments. What do you think?

Somewhere in the scripture it says that you should do things in quietness and that will blossom out. That doesn’t necessarily work in New York, but to go for the Marquee, you have to do the best, fight a good fight (in your own arena), and leave it there. Of course everybody would love to be published and recognized. Everybody likes a pat on the back. A publication is a joy for that reason, but that is all it is. It is not the essence. If you have the talent in fact it is good for the profession if you get publicity. However, if you don’t have the talent, it is not good for the profession.

architecture school portfolio

Article by Mark Jarzombek, Professor & Interim Dean of MIT SAP

Mark Jarzombek is an Associate Professor of the History and Architecture at MIT and the director of History, Theory and Criticism of Architecture and Art at MIT.
The modern notion of ‘an expert’ developed to a large extent in the second half of the nineteenth century in the context of the rise of Enlightenment bourgeoisie. By the 1880s, fields like geology, chemistry, medicine, engineering and related disciplines had begun to establish themselves with tell-tale manifestations like professional organizations, journals and annual meetings. Membership was not based on who one knew or on one’s aristocratic lineage, but on one’s ability to contribute to the field. It was a revolution of sensibilities that has all too often been forgotten in the wake of its success.

Without using too large a brush, however, I should add that the second half of the 19th also saw a remarkable interest in the liberated Ego, and I mean by that not the more limited technical definition coming out of Freud, but the broader, more psychological one with Max Stirner’s truly amazing and underappreciated book the Ego and his Own (1864) setting the tone. Holding the emerging expert culture in suspicion, he argued, for example, that the best violinists were not to be found in the Berlin Philharmonic, but on the docks of Hamburg. I mention this to remind us that expertise has to be seen outside of the insistent singularity that the work evokes. It is a historical formation and a unique by-product of the Enlightenment, and yet it is also through and through, dialectical, provoking its opposite at every turn of the clock. Frederick Winslow Taylor, for example, proposed the principles of scientific management in the same year, 1911, in which Wassily Kandinsky challenged the role of the art expert in the criticism of his paintings.

If expertise has a history that is relatively easy to identify because of its penchant for formalized discursive exchanges – not to mention its capacity to create communities around these exchanges -, the anti-expertise argument is just as tightly bound into the fabric of modernist thinking. In 1903, for example, the cultural critic, Wilhelm Uhde, was so convinced about the eminent death of art history, that he predicted that in the future people will no longer “want to whittle away long hours in the stagnant air of the archives writing catalogues”; they will want instead “to recognize the reality of the aesthetic will in the paradise of human creativity.” Such ideas were particularly attractive to American educators in the 1950′s (as I discuss in my book The Psychologizing of Modernity) when universities were looking for a uniquely American post-war ideology of authentic liberalism. Rudolf Arnheim, for example, wrote that one’s artistic sensibilities could easily be “drowned” by the flood of books, articles, dissertations, speeches, lectures, [and] guides” on the subject.

It would be wrong to see the history of expertise as a battle between the scientists and the artists, or as a struggle between academic and non-academic realities. Both want nothing more than to be seen as the legitimate formulated of the modernist episteme. When Kandinsky wrote the Pedagogische Skizenbuch, he was foreshadowing the notion that anti-experts so-to-speak can have their own standards of disciplinary behavior. It was as if the modernity of the Enlightenment, that had instrumentalized itself into something that we might now call “research,” (a word rarely encountered in academe until about 1890) encountered a different modernity that was based on a research for a rigorously grounded philosophically Ego. From Stirner, we go through Friedrich Nietzsche’s accusation that Immanuel Kant, of all people, was a bad philosopher because he was “too scholarly,” to Wilhelm Dilthey’s position that the historian’s history was less potent that the “history” that one can find in the poems of Lessing. For Edmund Husserl, the scientist’s science was weaker than the more encompassing science of “phenomenologists.” For Martin Heidegger, the knowledge of an urban technocrat pales in comparison to that of a Black Forest farmer. Closer to our time frame, we need only think of phenomenology, and its post 1970s appropriations of academe to see just how close in architectural education certain anti-intellectual trends still are.

At the heart of this is a legitimate and still unresolved crisis about the nature of intellectual production. Art history, in having separated in academe from art studio decades ago, might have won something in clarity, but I would say that architecture won something too by not yet succumbing to a neither-nor resolution of this crisis. It is a discipline where expertise – having come quite late in the game – is still in a struggle with its modernist shadow. In fact, architecture, it might well be said, is the last discipline in academe where expert and non-expert cultures (and its variously associated politics of exclusion and inclusion) still exist without many of the more common standards of disciplinary separation.

This significantly complicates the problem of how – and where – to locate epistemological gravitas in the field of architecture. Yet we have to accept that we are working in a space where the expert and the non-expert, the intellectual and the anti-intellectual, the historian and the designer, the academic and the professional, the disciplined and the purposefully un-disciplined, are, for better or worse – and in various combinations – bound up in each other’s destiny, leaving all of us in the state of uncertainty when it comes to understanding the scope and depth of architectural production. This does not mean that one must accept every brand and flavor of architectural thinking. It means, rather, that given the difficulties in understanding the shape of our discipline’s history, we have to be careful not to slide toward the easy answers.

 

Bob Stern - Architecture School Portfolio

Interview w/ Robert A.M. Stern, Dean of Yale School of Architecture

Robert A.M. Stern is the Principal of Robert A.M. Stern Architects and Dean of Yale School of Architecture.

DV: We would like, if it’s possible, to base your responses to both your experiences as the dean of Yale and your professional practice.
Graduate schools nowadays usually advertise their specialized programs in attempt to attract students and funds. What they usually end up doing, is to propose very specialized programs which inevitably create specialized technocrats. Plus, the general idea in architecture schools is that the architect must be a “renaissance man” with a generalist education, but in graduate schools what we see is strictly specialized education, programs like visualization, fabrication, BT, etc. Our question has to do with March programs which attract students that sometimes lack basic skills and directly go into very specialized programs. We would like to know your take on that, if you are for or against it, whether you think specialization is a trend and why.

R. Stern: I can’t answer all of the questions. You are asking me this as the dean of the architecture school, so I have to answer it as the dean of the architecture school. First of all, at Yale we don’t have that situation. We have three programs. We have what we call the Marchl, it’s for someone who has some or even no real background in architecture, comes out of typically American undergraduate colleges, with a BA degree majoring in everything from architecture to physics or history, and that program is three years long. Then we have a post-professional program, which has students who already have a bachelor of architecture degree. Historically, those students have come from American universities and abroad but more from America. Today that becomes less and less the case. Partially because many American schools do not offer the bachelor of architecture any more and they have gone to what is called the four plus two year plan. Obviously they want to keep their best students to go from the 4 year college where they get a BA or a BS to the graduate 2 year to get the March. Last, we have an advanced program called the MED, stands for master of environmental design which maybe a misleading title, but it’s for people who can have architecture degrees or not even, who want to pursue some kind of independent research for 2 years. In any case, the real answer to your question is that we don’t have specialized programs, we only are a school of architecture. It once, until 1968, had a planning department, it doesn’t have that now, it has no landscape architecture program, no urban design program and we believe in training people in the skills of architecture when they come in, and mostly to have a think about architecture, to see architecture as a means of thinking. Of course, we like to think we are training these leaders for the profession, who will be able to be a “renaissance man”, a term which is slightly out of fashion, so I would call them leaders who are generalists. In a table of specialists often the architect is the generalist. Of course, there are people developing specialties.

DV: How would you define the real generalist?

R. Stern: A generalist is someone who can through the processes of his thought, through the collection of his knowledge easily make connections between seemingly diverse things and bring people together and ideas together, to create a synthesis. A building really needs to be synthesis. A building needs to represent many diverse strands of attentions from the technical ones that are built in it, to the technical ones that are run in it, and the programs that are performed in it, and the different problems of paying for it, financing it, etc. That’s what it’s all about.
Of course, we are generalists but people specialize in my professional office. One of my partners, Alex Nimus, who has a BA degree from MIT 25 years ago and a master’s degree from Columbia when I used to teach, decided to make a specialty of libraries. He is interested in technology and he got interested in the problem between the new electronics and the libraries as traditional building types so he as made his specialty of libraries but he did not go to school, to Columbia or MIT, to specialize in library architecture which would be preposterous.
Pinup: Do you think that the generalist exists? Even if the generalist exists, it is really the generalist that drives this profession? Is really the generalist in this large pool of specialists able to first of all find a job, find a good place in the architecture industry and then push himself in higher levels of leadership?

R. Stern: You are asking me an awful lot of questions. People who have a talent or skill very often find their way into places or positions of responsibility in any field. First of all, I don’t like the work architecture as an industry, it’s a profession. If a student in an architecture school is allowed to pursue for two or three years of his/her time some narrow focus, urban housing or something like that, I would say that that student is being misled. Architecture school is so short, it used to be longer, even when I was in school it was four years, after four years of college. So, I think you need to be challenged from different sides. I can only speak of how we do it in Yale because we have a core curriculum, of course, we learn basics, we try to introduce the idea of habitation as a concept in one term, small public buildings as a responsibility and a challenge for architects, and a way to get their hands on certain complex relationships. We have a term called urbanism where we have students do what you might call urban design (but we don’t like that term because it’s a misused term), and then we have advanced studios where they are these famous professors who come in and you can take a class with Frank Gehry, Zaha Hadid, Jaquelin Robertson, and Demetri Porphyrios. That’s how we do it.
You are asking a person who is a generalist likely to succeed in the profession. Well, I would say the first thing is that, in school you learn how to think about architecture, you learn certain working methodologies, you learn how to draw, and you learn how to run a computer these days, and you learn the craft and some of the art of architecture. But I do not believe that schools should substitute for professional education. So the first and most important thing a student has to do when he/she leaves school is get the right job. Students don’t always get the right job. They don’t always listen to old guys like me, and I didn’t always listen to old guys when I was a student either.
DV: What is the right job?

R. Stern: The right job is to probably to go to a bigger office and not necessarily to the office that is doing the work you think you are going to be doing twenty years later, but doing the kind of quality and exposing you to the diversity and practices, the things that happen in architectural project. The problem is that many students, often the most talented, want to work for some small young architect who is five years older than they are who don’t have any idea what their doing more than the student themselves.

DV: But some of them might be widely published.

R. Stern: Oh yes, today especially, you can be published for just going to the men’s room or the ladies room, it’s ridiculous. In any case, to come to your skills and your destiny as an architect over more years than are represented of just being in school you need to know how to manufacture your opportunities and to move in. But one of the most important things is to pick the right architecture school. You also have to pick the first job you have because it can determine the entire character and the course of your career.

DV: Do you believe that students decide to become specialists because of the competitive market and because they try to get a better job?

R. Stern: No. I don’t know what the market is but we have 150 people working so I guess I am part of the market. When we hire someone who comes out of an architecture school, whatever school, they are people who can think, who have tried different things, who are fresh, free and smarter and more talented than I am. Yes, we hire specialists too. I need a structural engineer, we hire the best structural engineer, we need an environmental consultant, we hire the best environmental consultant. You name it: Lighting designers, landscape designers, whatever. The last thing I want is specialists. Of course, when we hire someone who just got out of school we realize that the first three years those people are going to in our office having their second three years of architecture school. That is fine. But I would like people to come out of architecture school knowing, for example, that things have measure, which is a big problem now. Most students have no idea how big anything is. If you ask them how big it is they don’t know because they see it on a computer screen, it has no scale. So that’s a battle I fight as a dean and a school and I fight as the leader of a large architectural practice.

DV: So, an academic education provides you with architectural thinking whereas an education you get from an office familiarizes you with the problems and issues in the profession.

R. Stern: Yes, but if you are in a good office you would be taught things also like how to handle a difficult client. There is no right or wrong, it’s about human dynamics. The architect who sits there and says no it has to be this way and pound the table and has a terrible temper usually doesn’t get anything accomplished. He is just a jerk. You need to see that as a young architect. You learn those things from older architects and from being in a good office where you should be invited to the meetings and sit maybe in the back row and see how it happens. It’s not just happening at the desk. Very often the decisions, incredibly important, are made between an architect and his consultants and sometimes the consultants and the client altogether on a table. We walk in with a sketch or a proposal and it comes out looking totally different. It doesn’t mean anybody is compromised. Everybody has learned.

DV: That is very interesting because it completely goes against what some of us read about architects today who are persistent and are considered very heroic.

R. Stern: Frank Gehry that I know pretty well builds the zaniest buildings of ever, but he is a very practical guy, he doesn’t pound his hands on the table. He brings people along. If you look at a competition that Frank Gehry enters or any good architect, Rem Koolhaas doesn’t make any difference, the technical problem that the clients asked is perfectly solved. So these are little things that I can say a thousand times in architecture school, Frank Gehry has said it a thousand times at Yale, and students don’t somehow want to hear it, but when they would come in an office that’s another part of their education. Schools are very important to give you a chance to limber up, to get your creative juices running, to measure up against other people of your age, to develop relationships with other students who will become your professional rivals and colleagues throughout your life. And that’s why it’s very important to go to a very good school. Because if you are surrounded by the best and brightest, those are the people you are going to put up against as you are competing.

DV: Another question we had in terms of legalizing: what we call specialization has to do more with licensing some firms to work in specific types of projects. Meaning that, Robert Stern is licensed, for example, to build labs whereas Diller and Scofidio are not.

R. Stern: Licensed? No, there is no such thing. As an architect you are licensed to practice architecture of any kind.

DV: I know, I am not saying there would be such a thing in the present, I am asking about the future.

R. Stern: Oh, that would be the worst thing imaginable! Zaha or Bob Stern should be allowed to design all kinds of buildings. I work very hard to go after projects just because I haven’t done projects like them before. But, we have done few laboratory buildings and we work with people who design the labs; we are not sitting there pretending to be experts on lab planning. There are people, some times architects, and some times from other disciplines, who do devote themselves to specialization.

DV: So you approve of that in this particular situation? You approve of the existence of the specialist?

R. Stern: Of course, I approve of specialized experts but I don’t approve of them studying lab planning in architecture school. This is something you come to. If you came here and worked for five years or ten years on houses, for example, you might say you are starting to become a specialist in residential architecture. We do a lot of campus buildings and campus plans, so we could say we are becoming specialists on that. Some people really enjoy a special kind of work, and I would propose to continue to do it. I am a more restless type, the leaders are often more restless. A guy like Bill Peterson of Kohn Peterson Fox does all these office buildings. All he wants to be asked to do is embassies, university buildings or houses. I have done some houses and quite a few midsize projects so I’m thrilled very now and then I get a chance to do a skyscraper. I fight against being pigeonholed in specialization, bit if I am going to do a skyscraper, we are working with teams of people, engineers and others, who know much more about skyscrapers. However, it’s not rocket science, you can get it, you can pick it up pretty fast. But there are millions, parts of it that are very specialized. For example, curtain wall design. There are people who spend their lives, engineers some time architects, studying how walls perform, new materials and so forth. All of this is great but in an architecture school you need to have an idea that all of this exists in the world or architecture. You need to be acculturated to the fact that it’s the architect who is the leader of a complicated team (the architect might have been in the 18th century a person who does everything), and you may be as a leader a person with the artistic spark that sets the whole thing to function.

DV: Do you think that schools should train project managers?

R. Stern: Not in the three or four years have in an architecture school. But you can become introduced to the problems and possibilities of project management if you have seminars where you have to get up and give a talk and you have to answer the questions of your fellow students and the professor and you have to interact. At Yale, all the students in first year compete to build an affordable 1,500SF house. Every student designs his own house over a weekend for the site, then students are put into teams and the teams get bigger and they ultimately compete. Every one of the four teams competes and the final competition has already made a set of drawings. Then they go out to the field. They are hammering and they are working on the other side of the table. So they look at architecture from the production side. Some students have shown management skills and some students have shown draft skills; it comes out in the process. But we don’t have a course for that. We are far from that.

DV: It is almost like providing the students with some basic skills, survival skills in the profession? I am kidding.

R. Stern: This project so called Yale-building project started in 1967 by the architect Charles Moore. Students wanted to add a more special engagement, so he cooked up the idea that students would build an affordable community. Initially, they were community centers and later they were camps for boy scouts and finally homes in New Haven. For 14 or so years students have built in New Haven, so there are 14 houses in the small city of New Haven each designed one a year and build which are occupied by first time owners, people who have never been able to buy a house. It’s a very interesting experience. That make for leaders, because somebody had to lead these teams and everything has to work, has to be organized; but we don’t have a course on it.

DV: What do you think about this trendy adoration of form nowadays? Form deriving from the computer…..

R. Stern: Well, architects are always looking for the new Jesus. They also want to find some new way that will somehow release their creativity. So whether it’s history or the technology of the electronics, or the technology of long span structures, or prefabrication, or whatever, people are always looking for new gods. And I think that’s true of us all as we go through life that we still need also to pay attention to the old god in general as opposed to the new gods, to the basic values of fine construction and have that to be the genesis of architecture. Of course, the new forms that are emerging in the computer are interesting; much more interesting to me is the new fabrication techniques and the new relationship between designer and fabricator that the computer will make possible. At Yale we have new digital equipment to further explore computer as simply an extension of the traditional tools of building.

DV: That is not how specific designers use those tools. They use them as the means to synthesize.

R. Stern: There are some designers who view it that way and some who don’t. Greg Lynn teaches at Yale and he manipulates the forms through the computer. He also likes to go down to the shop and see all the stuff we make down there and likes to play with that too. There are always new ways to explore architecture and new ways to evolve form. Some of them really do create new situations and some of them are just new shapes.

DV: Why would someone whose architecture derives from historical architecture, someone like Bob Stern, accept the recruiting of Greg Lynn to the faculty?

R. Stern: Because, first of all, I don’t believe that an architecture school is an academy or an office. I would hire Greg Lynn but he would have to do my work here in the office, but in Yale I hire him to be Greg Lynn. That is the reason why I think Yale has a successful way of approaching the basic issues you ask, because we don’t have specialization. The great experience of a student is to take Leon Krier one term and Greg Lynn the next term. Students also stand in the studios and see projects from each of them being debated and then we put on a jury Greg Lynn and Leon Krier. Instead of having just Leon Krier talking all people who believe the way Leon does and Greg Lynn talking all people who believe the way Greg does this is much more interesting, to have the dynamic; because the world is not simple. This is not the medieval world in France where nobody knew anything else beyond 50 miles more or less, this is the modern world. The modern world is full of contradictions, and contradictions are fine because you learn from them.

 

Adele Santos - Architecture School Portfolio

Interview w/ Adele Santos, Dean of MIT School of Architecture and Planning

Adele Santos is the Dean of the School of Architecture at MIT and principal of Santos Prescott and Associates.

DV: Today all architecture schools are advertising their specialized programs in architecture. Is this a calculated response to trends in the schools attempt to collect the best students and funds, and if this is a reality then how do you think it will affect the practice of architecture eventually?

Adele: Well, I think you are generalizing, which is not quite accurate because the specialization in this particular university and the way it is configured is highly unusual. I mean if you go to Penn, Berklee and other places you will not find this separation out into disciplined groups in the manner that you have here. It is quite different there. I think in most schools the focus is on bringing students into the Master of Architecture program and give them much more of a general education. In other words, you start right from the beginning integrating all these subjects as part of design, because they are not separate, and the idea then is that you are, in a way, dealing with a kind of general education in architecture that touches on all the foundational issues that we all believe in. The specialization tends to happen at a post-graduate level. So, people coming in with a professional degree, might choose, because they have already had that general background, to specialize in building technology or what have you.
I think the drift of it in architecture schools in general is to give a very balanced education where design is actually focused.

DV: Don’t you think, however, that even M.Arch students trap themselves in these fields due to a weak HTC department and a very competitive job-market that would pay more attention to a person with highly specialized technical skills?

Adele: No, I think this is actually rather overblown as an issue. I think that when you leave school and go to an office they are going to ask you some very specific things. They will look at your portfolio and see if you can design at all. They are certainly going to ask about your computer skills and which programs you know. And I think that people may choose to specialize later because of their interest. I mean somebody going into HTC, for example, is likely to want to teach one day. People who want to go further in building technology, probably want to seek out firms later where there is a different and more technological emphasis. But I do not think it is a marketing deal. For example, urban design would be something that a number of schools have. And somebody who has gone through architecture and wants to know more about the city because that is their passion, will go to Harvard or us, or UPenn or Berlkee, to “specialize” in that. I started in architecture and I got my Master of Architecture and went on to Harvard to do urban design because I hadn’t had enough of it, and then I went to Penn and did City Planning. So I was accumulating degrees, but it was a very specific strategy to add to my architecture diploma.

DV: How were things different in the seventies when you started practicing on your own and when the norm was generalist architects that relied on one only undergraduate degree than they are now?
Adele: Well, there was a big change in architectural education when in the United States the Master of Architecture degree became the first professional degree. Before that it was B.Archs. I have a B.Arch. The extent to which it is fit to practice, I do not think it has to do with the educational institutions as much as with the change of practice itself, because I think practice has changed a lot. The client groups have changed a lot also. We were dealing with individuals more and now we are dealing with committees. If you are in the public sector you also have to deal with the public process. So the nature of practice has changed a lot and has become international, national, etc. People do not practice in the locale. You could be anywhere. And then once you deal with computerization and all the change of that, then we do not even have to be in the same place to practice together.
Scale has changed, the complexity of projects, the palettes of materials and methods available, the way teams are composed, for example, now there are more offices that agree to collaborate to do a job, so that you do not have to be the hundred person firm in order to do a big job. You can be a four person firm that teams regularly with an eight person firm. So there are clusters formed and I think this is very different.
Pinup: Is the architect of today still a generalist?
Adele: I think you start by being a generalist and you add on skill sets. That is what people, for example, will get people to do in their office.
Pinup: But should the architect’s generalist education change into something more specific as the game of the field changes? Should the architect be able to acquire more competitive skills in project management, economics or negotiation instead of as much theory and design?

Adele: If you go to any office, you sort out the skill set and there are people that just inherently are talented in design sets, other people are naturally talented technologically. Unfortunately, there are not so many of those. Some people have management skills. I think for us to be training managers in architecture schools is just a waste of time because we have got so much to teach. And, indeed, there are more things to learn now and we have less time to teach them. Instead of six years we have three and a half. So, we keep leaving things out of the curriculum, which is scary. For example, students graduate these days with very little knowledge of the history of architecture. All that stuff just kind of gets dropped out. It seems like a luxury to put the time into that, but that’s ridiculous.

DV: Have you noticed that at MIT?

Adele: I haven’t looked at it enough, but I have been told that you do not have enough of it. And it’s amazing, how can we be dealing with a design language without understanding the history that led us to where we are. I don’t think we deal with contemporary history, by the way.

DV: Do you think that three and a half years is too short?

Adele: Well, yes, it is too short and we are longer than most programs in the country. The question really is …”is our teaching methodology correct? Because I suspect not! We do not teach in a way that is really well calibrated with what we are trying to impart.

DV: Do you think that students, especially some M.Arch’s here at MIT lack basic architectural skills, not just when they enter buy also when they graduate from the school?

Adele: I have argued that this is actually extremely unfair for students to come in without the basic skills to allow them to be effective. If you don’t know how to draw and see and do all sorts of things, that puts you at a disadvantage immediately, so at Penn we had a crash course during the summer that was really important. If you did not have the skills you had to take this intensive course, it would take a lot of time to catch up. I think it takes a good semester or two to catch up. And that is wasting time. So, if we do three and a half years we have to be better at teaching what we need students to know in a more effective fashion. I mean the other thing I always complain about, and have not had the chance to look at here, is that you have to pick the right vehicle to do the job, so you are trying to teach contextualism or whatever. Pick a problem that is not so complicated that you end up doing all kinds of stuff, which interferes with the real focus of what you are really trying to teach. We tend to overcomplicate things, when we can get the message across very simply. And I think that a lot of information can be recorded and replayed, so students can digest it and so that we don’t spend our time in the lecture room giving all the facts. It should be to discuss the implications of issues. There are ways of changing our teaching.

DV: What would be a good way of improve basic skills?

Adele: What I did at the University of San Diego was that Fridays was the skill-set day, and we had tutors. The faculty was available but it was all scheduled for the tutors to deal with computer skills, model-making skills, woodworking skills, and whatever else possible, and people could actually do this. Some of them were not about improving skill sets, but more about learning to do fantastic perspectives, or fly-throughs. So, by the end of the fifth semester, everybody was at the same level and quite sophisticated because they had their Friday tutors taking them through this.

DV: Are MIT students ready for the profession of architecture after three and a half years?

Adele: No, the time here is short, but I am mostly interested in training students on how to think and problem solve because you are never going to have all the knowledge. But, if you have a way of approaching information and problem-sets, then the knowledge comes through the process of discovering. But you can certainly put it into a conceptual framework that everybody going out would know how to approach a series of issues, particularly on a technical level. That, in a way, is sort of on the job training and you sit down in an office and work with someone who is superior in knowledge to you, but you at least need to know how to tackle the issues that all sorts of specialists will bring to the table [engineers, etc.]. I think that we need to figure out what we really need to teach immediately, which is why the idea of management would be silly for us to do because not everybody is going to be a manager anyway. Maybe one in ten will have the temperament to deal with this aspect of the profession, so, why go through that? We must touch on the basics through the lens of architectural design because this is the moment we can do that. Once you go into an office, you are on your own.

DV: Would you consider that design is the core around which everything else revolves?

Adele: No, and that is the part that needs to be strengthened. If that is really strong, and to be strong, in my opinion, it has to be larger. You cannot bring in 12 students, for example. You should allow 24 students to enter. Then you get four faculty teaching them and you get a much richer education, and then the following semester you bring in the two and a half year students. Once you get to the elective studios, you have more choices. If you only have the choices of two things it’s not good enough. You need more choices. You need a better exposure to a world of ideas and then you work your way through it. So, I think if the core of our program is really strong, then all the surrounding elements that appear to be satellites right not, are integrated into it because this core is the focal piece, and what holds everything together. When it is too small, it appears to be not important as there is more faculty surrounding this than there are in the middle. As a diagram, it simply does not work.

DV: What type of firm would you suggest would be more beneficial for a young architectural professional to work for in order to develop as an architect?

Adele: I look at each student individually. Some people would flourish at a large firm, and some would get lost there and they would be making tea and coffee. I think it has a lot to do with the personality. The really talented people in terms of design usually want to go into a smaller firm that is know for design because they want to identify with that firm and its belief system. Of course, it is difficult to get into one of these firms unless you are extremely talented and you have a fabulous portfolio and there are people who want to work with you. I think that in terms of a large firm you can get incredibly good training if you just deal with it for a year or two. Go in there and learn the technical stuff that you did not learn at school, understand the process of an office, and be alert to learning. The main thing is that you have just begun a lifetime of learning. Hopefully we have set in place a way of thinking about architecture that is a healthy and good one and then when you go out you can work and aggressively try to learn as much as you can wherever you are! Pick it all up!

Rafael Vinoly - Architecture School Portfolio

Interview w/ Rafael Vinoly

Rafael Vinoly is the principal of Rafael Vinoly Architects PC, a New York City based firm, with offices in Lower Manhattan and London.

AJ: RVA functions not just as a firm, but also as a place for continuing education for its many young young employees. That makes you not just an employer but also a teacher. As such, do you prefer working with specialists or generalist architects?

RAFAEL: The reason for the average age in my firm being so young has more to do with my own optimism that somehow it is better to have the chance of working with people that are eager to learn and are not overtaken by the frivols and the complexities of the profession. On the other hand that has a counter-side to it, which is that in reality [working in an office] is NOT supposed to be and SHOULD NOT be an educational experience. But the truth is that there is nothing inherently wrong with that. What is wrong, I think, is that people come out of school with a combination of skills which are not really related to the craft and it seems to me that this is something that has been supported by academia for the last fifteen or twenty years, under the big excuse that this is the time for experimentation and research. I think these two things are sort of prototypical in architecture. You would not find anybody in science or in medicine or in any other discipline that would think that because you know nothing you are capable of researching. It is in fact quite the opposite.

This Lack of real, serious interest in the construction and the craft and how the craft is actually performed is also emblematic of the last years of architectural thinking, which has been not really productive. It has really delivered this visual perception of everything being the same. So, I think that education is essentially not delivering people with a minimal level of performance skills to a job-market that is extraordinarily competitive and very badly paid. If you put it really in economical terms, your product is not really helping anybody.

Architecture IS a craft. If you were a pianist and you had to go through six years of conservatory they would not have you talk about the piano. Either you can move your fingers or you are out! And if you are composing or are in any of the other disciplines in which you have accreditation or knowledge if you do not know the basics. And the basics ARE basic. It is almost in the way which a brain actually constitutes itself. And then you must build on them. Even if you are in the fashion industry, you need to know how to saw, how to manipulate the fabric, how to draw … there are some basic things that you must learn that are in my view NOT elementary. That is all!

AJ: Do you think that architecture schools are effective enough in terms of teaching students the basics? Regarding M.Arch. programs in particular, do you think a new student that comes from fields irrelevant to architecture will ever have the chance to really acquire these basic skills and cultivate them?

RAFAEL: There are two different kinds of methods of organizing the way people learn something at university level. The European and Latin way of doing that is that first they put you in front of this moment of mortgaging your life with a profession at a young age, which I think is absolutely insane. So, I do think that it is perfectly ok to come into architecture from any field, the same way I feel that it is perfectly all right coming into any field from architecture. The problem is that it requires a certain level of knowing what it takes to do the thing, not at an instrumental level, because by instrumentalizing you become sorry for having to learn and you would feel better if it was given to you as a pill. I think it is exactly the opposite. I think the basics are literally where the stuff is!

Picasso used to say (paraphrasing), “I draw better than Rafael [the painter], so I can do these crazy things that I do!” Everybody else that tried to draw like he drew without knowing HOW to draw … well … you see what happened! This is a personal view on an orientation on how to organize the learning according to what really practice is. What is not really a personal view, but is an across the board realization, is that you come out of school and confront a reality that was not similar twenty five or thirty years ago. Then you had the chance to get a job, and your job was better paid, and you knew how to navigate through it, while learning every single day. Is it not enough to know that there is something that is not quite really working?

The sophistication and emphasis on the philosophical component of architecture is something that people seem to privilege now possibly because it is fashion, but you know, you have an obligation to be cultivated whether you are an architect or a welder. It is the same as assuming that a certain degree of virtuosity is enough when in reality there is a set of goals that one pursuits throughout one’s whole life.

AJ: What would you say is responsible for students choosing to specialize in specific modern design tools instead of creating a strong basis on the real fundamentals of architecture?

RAFAEL: If you look at the way schools are organized you realize that they are competing for bright students and teachers that have a big name. All these things are commendable and great, but they are not a substitute for having a notion of how the hell you are going to teach , and what it is that you are teaching! ¾ of the people that teach have never built in their lives. But, have you ever see a surgeon that teaches surgery without having ever operated? So, it is a complex set of issues that all converge into what I meant to say when I told you that the system is in crisis from the notion that you are supposed to perform a service in one interpretation or make an artistic contribution in another interpretation, in a climate where unless you sell a label there is no way of verifying whether you know what you are talking about or not.

What else other than competition among students would you expect from an approach to building as a cultural phenomenon that one’s experience of architecture gets started through reading magazines. This is really like beating a dead horse, but it is also the crux of this thing. As if the visual is the only thing that counts.
When you treat a building by simply laying out a simple organizational function and then loading it up with all these intentions about what is the form that you want to produce, then there is a problem. That is because in the end of the day there is a specificity about what constitutes an architectural idea, which has to do with much more than what it looks like.

This type of crisis is created by the market but it I also created by the market that really drove architecture to take this stand. I do think that in the end of the day, if you could construct a school of this of if you could get more than 3% of the budget of the country in the hands of architects, ten all that would be terrific. But to claim for that while these statistics are not really improving is absolutely suicidal and you keep fostering the thing to two or three guys that are lucky enough to make it through, but in the end of the day we are here for something else other than pay the rent … right ?

AJ: Should generalist architects avoid developing extensive knowledge in specific areas of the profession?

RAFAEL: The way an architect’s mind works is completely interpretive, which means that you do not know much about anything, but you know sufficiently about almost everything! So, because people have for so long talked about things that are not connected to the practice, other practices take hold in areas, where your performance as an architect is not really satisfactory. In other words you do not know how to put together a financial package of you do not know how to build a theater, and then the financial and the theater consultants appear. These are people that specialize in these things … but if you scratch the surface, and this might sound a little brutal to say, what they are doing is not really rocket-science. The stuff that these people know is absolutely a piece of cake. It is just that it becomes very difficult to do what you are supposed to do as an architect with these very elementary things when you are not exposed to them, not even slightly and when your brain is not trained to adapt to them as they are and as they change. You cannot take on specialization as a phenomenon outside of market conditions, because I think they are the ones that reveal a crisis of the culture.

AJ: Should schools educate project manaers, meaning people with better managerial skills and technical knowledge, rather than architects?

RAFAEL: The project management of architecture goes back to what the craft is. It is simply the craft. That is the only way you do things. A building is so large and complex and expensive that the minute you reduce it to something you are immediately put in that level of specialization. A project manager is just a bad term. Just call it the Architect. That is what you should know. That is the only integrative part of the profession, which is what makes an architect indispensable.
Three quarters of what you see today as being a royal disaster are functions of breaking down the pie into too many portions and not having a wholistic view of how this thing integrates into the whole system, other than the on that controls it, which is basically the financial component.

AJ: What was the profession like in the good-ole times?

RAFAEL: The good ole times were quiet times, in which the basic desire for notoriety was by far much more subdued, because it was clear that in the rotation of the media since you produced one of these things every five to seven years, you were in a clear disadvantage to a movie star, so nobody really thought that this was going to happen [becoming a star]. Now it does happen. The lack of visibility at that level of intensity I always thought was great. For instance if you are a real mover and shaker on the financial markets then the best thing to happen to you is to be undetected. Nobody wants to show up in every single magazine.

Also, we did not have all those different categories back then. Have you ever seen anything more ridiculous than this category of the design architect versus … another kind of architect? I mean what is an architect other than a designer? If you are not a design architect, you are not an architect, and if you are a design architect you should be able to do everything that is design, from putting together a building, to negotiating, etc. Because otherwise, the financier will ask you “why should I pay you more than for a piece of trace where you put some pastel over”. I am sure in fact that the people in architecture schools know that the entry level salary is less than if you were a maid. You tell me how in the whole world you can be compared with a person that is a paralegal that has an entry level salary of seventy-five thousand dollars a year!

The fact is that most students are unable to compensate the cost of their own education. Seven years of education and there is absolutely no way one can pay for it. Why is this the case other than because of the status of out whole system? But the thing is … can you put a building together after you graduate? No! What your education prepares you for is to maybe write a book, which of course you cannot do either, but the threshold for judging one’s worth is really undeterminable and this is exactly why you are getting paid less.
There is only one verifiable factor: specialization seems like a life-saver in our professional storm, because how the hell are you going to make it otherwise! And I think that is also revealing the same problem, which is that you are not going to make it that way either. Tomorrow you are going to decide that you are only going to do schools that are not more than 25,000 sq ft because you think that is what you are extraordinarily good at! Well … Bullshit, because then, through the filters of checking all these little squares that tell you “yes, I did check the efficiency of this and that and have used a rational structural system and have checked the HVAC too, and have selected healthy materials” and so on, you have a piece of crap anyway! And that is exactly in the crux of the problem, which is that you need an Archtiect!

AJ: Are there specialists in your office, and if yes, then how do you engage them in the process of design?

RAFAEL: In our office there are some people that have become interested in some parts of the process. Architecture is like tailoring versue mass producing suits. You have to be there and custom design the suit for the person in the place at the moment. Also, I feel that you cannot put your name on the door if the designs are not YOUR designs. You cannot have a corporate approach to design.

If you go to a hospital, you know that the hospital has a principle who is a doctor. So much so that there is no way to leave out that doctor, who has that particular skill inside of one anonymous organization. So, what you get is basically crap, under the big name of X! The truth of course is that does not happen in medicine, but it does happen in architecture. So, you have all these people that could not be any more market oriented, that have expertise or experience. There were experienced people for example that were terrific architects, like Skidmore, Owens and Merrill, who were fabulous architects and long gone, and replaced by another crew that was very good, and then another crew that was not so good and now you have … SOM as we know it!

AJ: Do you think that specializing in a specific type of design, or stylistic approach or even design philosophy that are directly related to the Principle of a firm could be frustrating for its partners after the Principle retires?

RAFAEL: I do not have an intention to know what will happen when I die. As a matter of fact I could not care less. What will happen to the firm is a choice of the associates. IF they have learnt only one thing, then they will have exactly the same kind of crazy operation that happened with Frank Lloyd Wright. None of the people that stayed there were Frank Lloyd Wright, and they kept doing everything the same way, even drawing using similar types of lines and crayons. It is a different problem of course when you are grounded in a particular vision of what is important in architecture. The problem with Gehry’s firm for example, is that is the only thing that is real. And this is all an interesting problem, whether that is an important thing to have or not. Then, you have no other choice but to refer back to the same thing, which is where the market is. And the market is all of those things.

AJ: Do you have any advice for new students or professors?

RAFAEL: I have more than an advise for new students, but advising the professors is a difficult thing. I know that most of these people are extraordinarily devoted and for reasons that have nothing to do with them they find themselves in situations like this. As a matter of principle I have a lot to say about arrogance, and you know how much of that is around us, so it is hard to really advice these people. But I think that the only real way to give good advice is to act upon it. The craft is not how many programs you know of whether you can tell from afar how much a building weights. The craft is about what you think, and how you construct your system of beliefs, not “A” system of beliefs, but your own, and how important it is, and basically understanding the mechanisms of self criticism, which is the only thing that you people have to do. If you have talent or not is another thing, but to assume but to assume that you do not need to nurture talent or that if you do not have it you are dea, that is idiotic. I would not be able to give advice to any student without trying to correct the system, and that would happen by getting one of these deanships in any of these universities and have card-blanch and just change everything. And that takes to change the perception of the access to school and have a level of rigor that may sound a little bit exaggerated, but that is how it is in everything else. If you are in a music school there in not such a thing as not finishing a piece if you are in a composition class. Many architecture students never finish anything. And one would argue that a work of art is worked on throughout the artist’s life, but what we are talking about are not works of art, they are training exercises. If you do not finish, you are out. Not because I am a tyrant, but because you yourself should walk out. Is it not a good level of discipline? Do not tell me that we have it, because we do not. Our system is an absolute joke!

The problem is that nobody knows how difficult architecture is. It is very difficult in more than just an internal process level. How do you think about whether you are right or wrong? Usually arrogance helps you in that direction and hurts you in another, but there is a system through which you can tell yourself that what you are trying to push all these people to do is correct. The other thing is that you have to know how to do it, because it changes as you do it.

This whole crisis about the question of theory and other sources of inspiration is just because these people are completely at a loss relatively to the importance of architectural knowledge. You do not need to apply psychoanalysis to a building or study the vibration of practice X. It sounds interesting, but it is pitiful. It is completely insane!

AJ: Do you think that in the end it is lack of creativity that causes all this?

RAFAEL: It is the lack of knowledge of what the hell you are doing! Because If you told me that you are a pottery maker, and you have never seen clay in your life, then you can talk about it all you want, but you are NOT a pottery maker! Te craft is hard to understand and painful to grasp. So many people replace it with this easy-to-grasp, unverifiable stuff. I taught at Yale, and I had not one, but two students that were telling me they were doing fractals … they have no idea what fractals are!

AJ: What do you think the reactions of other disciplines such as engineers would be to this attitude?

RAFAEL: They laugh at it! But the thing is cyclical and completely incestuous because nobody asks, because if you ask you have to go and cover yourself under the bed! It is the most embarrassing thing in the world. This is my own personal vision of how the situation is. The truth is that the age people that are at the forefront of that line are people of practically my age that have never built anything in their lives.
To make it simple, specialization is a reactive answer to a problem that is somewhere else. The last thing you want is you to become a sports architect or a specialized architect. There is not such a thing because the whole subject is to be critical about. If you are critical, you have to be a thinker. You have to be able to interpret these things and be open to learning and have the skills to learn them fast.

When we started designing labs, they had for 30 years been the sole complete sub-market of a group of firms you have never heard of in your lives. These spaces, which to me are some of the most completely interesting spaces today, is where something really interesting is happening. Where else? Certainly not in museums by the way! Today you hear all these firms designing labs, and that is because that is the only thing that is being funded. Where does the money come from? It comes from all the people that have someone in their family with a medical condition that needs research and know that these guys can cure it. This is now! Ten or fifteen years ago, I had no idea what they were talking about. In that case what you do is walk in the room and you say ” I do not understand the first thing about this, would you please explain this to me? “And they kick you out of the room or you learn it, and when you learn it you realize it is the simplest thing in the world. In the end of the day in fact, if you go back and look at the evolution of laboratory design, the only thing that has always been there as a matter of real knowledge was one dimension and one idea of the complexity of coordination. The dimension was 11.46′, and the complexity is that you cannot juxtapose tightly structure with HVAC systems. That’s it! When you do that, then you do exactly what everybody else does, which is that you start asking the real people, who are the scientists, who are completely underrepresented and are suffering there buildings forever, until you start doing things that are empowering and derive from listening to these people. The only person that can do this thing is an architect and the best thing that can happen to you is to know nothing, because then you can see what is really behind the problem.

Anyway, in the end, have you seen an environment more competitive for essentially nothing? Because if you told me that the salaries were $300,000 a year I would say ok! Power? What power? In the end it is all very lamentable I think, because it is not that this stuff is unsubstantial. For example if you are a specialist in tap-dancing and tap-dancing does down the tubes, it is not that terrible, because you can avoid it by not going to the theater. But our thing, you cannot avoid … It is all around you!

Preparing a Winning Portfolio for Architecture School Admissions

by EVANGELOS P. LIMPANTOUDIS, M.Arch. MIT, class of 2006

So you are sitting home, looking over the Harvard GSD admissions brochure, starring and the samples of work they included supposedly from current students, and wondering how you will ever be able to make it there. “These people must be the most talented designers in the entire universe” you think!!! “There is no way poor little untalented me could ever compete and be accepted by this institution”, you think…

The fact is that if you are right about the quality of any of the work that you see and the work that Harvard, MIT, Princeton, Yale and all the other big guys make you think their students magically produce, it is very likely that the designer was either very lucky or had a great talent in photography, model-building and Photoshop. Let’s be clear here, and not beat around the bush just to defend our own profession (I am an architect too you see): Even the most experienced eye can be fooled when looking at a mediocre piece of design that is well documented and formatted and appeals to the better angels of our taste. Key thing to remember is that nothing that these schools tell you about their requirements for admission have anything to do with reality. The fact is that the faculty and students that will examine your work (keep that locked up in your mind and never forget it – it is not a bunch of random admissions people that look at your work. This is not college applications guys) will look at your portfolio for about 50% of the review time, then read through your essay for about 25% of the time, then spend 15% of the time examining your recommendation letters and finally the rest of the 10% will be taking a quick look at your overall academic performance up to that point. Do you get my point? The hierarchy of significance of submitted material for architecture and design schools is completely different from that of other schools. Here are the elements of application in order of significance:

1) Portfolio
2) Essay
3) Recommendations
4) Resume (Overall personality and extracurricular interests, awards, travels)
5) Transcript (Academic performance, awards, GPA and individual relevant course grades)
6) GRE … honestly, as long as you get the minimum that they require, most schools will take you as long as the other stuff is up to par.

So, stop worrying about that dreadful GRE day, and stop wasting your beautiful money on Kaplan and Princeton Review courses… Nothing against them, I think they are excellent tutoring services, and if you have extra money, by all means let them have it. But if you really want to make a difference in your application, focus on building the rest of your application. How? Well, that’s the trick.

The truth is that there are several schools of thought as far as how to approach a design school application. One approach is to make sure that every single part of your application is perfect, or sounds perfect to the admissions officers. The fact is that this would be fantastic in any occasion, but how often does it really happen that you have perfect everything? The truth is that as great as having perfect framing of recommendations and a perfect resume etc, they will fall apart if they do not build a very specific idea in the minds of the examiner about you, your work, your interests, your position in the school, your position in the world, etc. In essence, if in the fifteen minutes in which the examiner will go over your package you do not manage to build up an image that could sum you up in one sentence, then you have lost the game (unless of course your grades or your portfolio are absolutely 100% perfect, which usually doesn’t happen unless you are already LeCorbusier, or Koolhaas or Dali, or a bookworm). What kind of sentence? Something like “the sustainable architecture guy”, or “the dude with the fabric models” or “that guy that thinks everything is a bridge” or “the social architecture girl” etc. When you manage to build a profile that consists of a bunch of different ideas all converging at one point (the essence of your package), then you have managed to win the battle before it has even started.

The strategy above is not unlike the type of strategy that they use in marketing. In fact, what you are doing when applying to architecture school, is positioning yourself as a competitor of all other applicants, in the environment of the architecture school that you are applying to. It is a type of personal marketing, and whether you like it or not, it is the most effective way of making sure that you communicate exactly who you are to the overworked and over-bored admissions officers, who will be flipping through your portfolio for a few minutes (if you are lucky) and then will be moving on to the next one.

Bottom line of all this, is that you should never start with your portfolio. Always start with the first draft of your essay. Begin by addressing four issues: 1) who you are. 2) Who/ what do you want to become. 3) How will architecture school help you get there, and 4) How will this SPECIFIC architecture school (GSD, MIT, GSAPP, or whatever you choose) help you achieve your goal. See the process of writing not as an opportunity to use big cool words, because this is not going to be read by admissions advisors (yet). This is an exercise for you and just you to understand yourself, so your vocabulary must be as simple and to the point as you feel comfortable with.

After you are done writing your essay, try to find the key sentences that encapsulate the essence of what you are looking for in your education, how you will contribute, etc. After that, compose a single paragraph that captures your own essence. This paragraph will be the core of your whole application. And after you decide on it, and are happy with it and the idea it communicates, you will proceed to the development of the rest of the material, ALWAYS making sure that everything is connected with / grounded on the core paragraph.

Developing a portfolio is a multistage process, which requires good judgment and thinking, but the first step before developing it is getting the main idea very clearly specified in your head. After that, you can start thinking how and what type of work to develop, or how to arrange and present your already existing work. We will cover that in different articles.

2013 B.Arch. and M.Arch. Rankings

The 2013 rankings, published by

DesignIntelligence (DI) America’s Best Architecture and Design Schools survey,

 

Architecture, Undergraduate

1. Cornell University
2. Southern California Institute of Architecture
3. Rice University
3. Syracuse University
5. California Polytechnic State Univ., San Luis Obispo

 

Architecture, Graduate

1. Harvard University
2. Columbia University
3. Yale University
4. Massachusetts Institute of Technology
5. Cornell University

 

Landscape Architecture, Graduate

1. Harvard University
2. Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University
3. Cornell University
3. Louisiana State University
5. University of Virginia

 

Interior Design, Graduate

1. Savannah College of Art and Design
2. Rhode Island School of Design
3. Pratt Institute
4. Cornell University
4. Parsons The New School of Design

The Most Important Thing To Remember When Putting Together an Architecture School Portfolio

The biggest deal when dealing with graduate architecture school applications is YOU and not your work. In essence, even if you have a B.Arch., your focus should not be on your most perfect renderings, but on those drawings and sketches that bring up your own personality and way of thinking. Through these sketches you will manage to build a narrative that will demonstrate to the admissions committee a) your PROCESS of thinking and composing, b) your ability to conceive IDEAS and develop them into tangible strategies and plans, c) your ability to precisely communicate in a few pages what you are thinking clearly and simply, and d) your personality as it is manifested in your design.
Try locking up your portfolio in a drawer for a week, and start from scratch, focusing on the ESSENCE of the work, which (in this case) is the process itself. Begin with your essay (Yes! the admissions essay), and use it as a road-map for the portfolio. Use the essay to analyze yourself and what you are, what you stand for, and what you want to achieve in your career. Then, develop a theme for your portfolio that you will be able to describe in a paragraph. Then, develop a narrative based on a) the theme, and b) the projects that you have available to show. This narrative will be how your strategy will unfold. Then, take each one of your projects and try to fit them in the narrative. For this, you will need to pretty much tell a story for each project. I do not mean sit down and write an essay for each. I mean use visual material like sketches, diagrams, mappings, sketch-models, etc, formatted and laid out appropriately, in order to tell your story. If you do not have this material, PRODUCE IT!!! There is no law (yet) against post-rationalizing and post-producing. If its ok for Renzo Piano to do it, then it is ok for you to do it too.

Portfolio Tip: Your Portfolio Format Is The Commissioner’s Plan For Your Portfolio

Just like a city’s character can be defined by the organization of it’s urban blocks (see difference between NY and Paris for example), a portfolio can be defined by the organization of images on its pages. I am not suggesting that a square format or a grid format will define you as X versus someone else who will be defined as Y or Z by their use of linear or free-flowing formats. What I am saying is that the format will create a rhythm, a type of presentation, and will have some rules that may/ may not be appropriate for some projects or some target audiences. It is a very important factor to consider and try to determine early on.

Portfolio Tip: Synthetic Images = Convenient Flattened Narratives

They say that a picture can be a thousand words, but that won’t do you any good if they are not controlled words, words that describe your idea clearly to the viewer. When it comes to presenting ideas, one of the most important things is trying to balance between fragmenting and integrating ideas. When it comes to integrating ideas, nothing is more annoying than a failed format, and nothing is more pleasant and informative than a successful one. The way we arrange photos, drawings and pictures, often referring to the same exact element, will determine how receptive the viewer is of our project. In the case of the Architecture School Admissions, it will make the difference between an M.Arch. applicant, and an M.Arch. Candidate.

Portfolio Tip: Diagramming = The Architect’s Text

Effective diagramming of ideas and processes can make the difference between an architect and just an aspiring architect. The ability to communicate ideas quickly with a swing of a pencil will be essential throughout your career, from team-meetings at the firms you will work, to meetings with clients or contractors. Diagramming is particularly significant when putting together a portfolio as well, because (simply put) no one will read your text. The admissions committee members will take a quick look at some of your pages, and if they do not grasp their attention immediately, you and your lofty dreams are toast (very very dry). A great diagram captures the essence of your ideas and designs, and presents it in a way that captivates and often inspires the viewer. Mastering the art of diagramming is essential and if you don’t do it, someone else will.

Portfolio Tip: Process = Essence

If I were to grade the level of importance of individual elements or ideas that come together to compose a portfolio, I would say that “Process” is by far at the top. The reason for this is that as architects we live and die by the processes that we use when working on our projects. It makes sense therefore, that the process of creating a project is actually more important (when putting together a portfolio) than the product itself.

Portfolio Design and strategic Admissions Consulting for Schools of Architecture

TARGETING THE TOP 3 >>> Design Intelligence’s annual “America’s Best Architecture & Design Schools” rankings

Research and Theory

1
Harvard University
2
Yale University
3
Massachusetts Institute of Technology
4
Princeton University
5
Southern California Institute of Architecture Sustainable design practices

Construction methods and materials

1
California Polytechnic State University, San Luis Obispo
2
Kansas State University
3
University of Kansas
4
Syracuse University
5
University of Cincinnati Research and theory

Sustainable design practices

1
Kansas State University
2
California Polytechnic State University, San Luis Obispo
3
University of Oregon
4
University of California, Berkeley
5
Auburn University
6
Massachusetts Institute of Technology
Most-admired undergraduate architecture programs
1
Cornell University
2
Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University
3
Cooper Union
4
Syracuse University
5
California Polytechnic State University, San Luis Obispo
Most-admired graduate architecture programs
1
Harvard University
2
Columbia University
3
Massachusetts Institute of Technology
4
University of Pennsylvania
5
University of Michigan
Portfolio Design and strategic Admissions Consulting for Schools of Architecture

Effective Portfolio Design Approach

by Elos
  • 1

    Take multiple photos of each model or project created. Play with the light while taking the photographs to broaden your selection. Choose photographs that have no distractions such as background images, and photographs that contain clear quality

  • 2

    Do not contain projects without 3D drawings of photographs. You could be the best draftsman in the world, however, neglecting to show a potential employer the actual item implies that you may not know how to turn your drawings into actual structures.

  • 3

    Hand draw as much as possible. Any person can draft with computer assistance, but drafting by hand shows true craftsmanship and allows you to expand your mind to laying out structures with shapes and curves that simply cannot be captured on a computer.

  • 4

    Choose a page size and layout that is not too large and can be looked through easily. The standard option for a portfolio is 8 1/2 x 11 inches because it provides adequate page space without forcing you to place items that are too small to see or overwhelmingly large.

  • 5

    Place the page number on the same location for each page.

  • 6

    Lay out your projects beginning with a strong project and finishing stronger. Do not include work that you feel is not your best.

  • 7

    Choose a neutral color to avoid creating a negative impact in your portfolio. Avoid choosing patterns that are too busy as they can distract from your architectural work.

  • 8

    Place one or two photosonr each page, taking up as much space as possible without altering the images. Do not overlap images or resize images in a way that will change their appearance.

Portfolio Design and strategic Admissions Consulting for Schools of Architecture

Portfolio for Architecture School Applications: A Narrative Manifestation of your Admission Strategy

by Elos

 

The truth is that there are several schools of thought as far as how to approach a  design school application. One approach is to make sure that every single part of your application is perfect, or sounds perfect to the admissions officers. The fact is that this would be fantastic in any occasion, but how often does it really happen that you have perfect everything? The truth is that as great as having perfect framing of recommendations and a perfect resume etc, they will fall apart if they do not build a very specific idea in the minds of the examiner about you, your work, your interests, your position in the school, your position in the world, etc. In essence, if in the fifteen minutes in which the examiner will go over your package you do not manage to build up an image that could sum you up in one sentence, then you have lost the game (unless of course your grades or your portfolio are absolutely 100% perfect, which usually doesn’t happen unless you are already LeCorbusier, or Koolhaas or Dali, or a bookworm). What kind of sentence? Something like “the sustainable architecture guy”, or “the dude with the fabric models” or “that guy that thinks everything is a bridge” or “the social architecture girl” etc. When you manage to build a profile that consists of a bunch of different ideas all converging at one point (the essence of your package), then you have managed to win the battle before it has even started.

The strategy above is not unlike the type of strategy that they use in marketing. In fact, what you are doing when applying to architecture school, is positioning yourself as a competitor of all other applicants, in the environment of the architecture school that you are applying to. It is a type of personal marketing, and whether you like it or not, it is the most effective way of making sure that you communicate exactly who you are to the overworked and over-bored admissions officers, who will be flipping through your portfolio for a few minutes (if you are lucky) and then will be moving on to the next one.

Bottom line of all this, is that you should never start with your portfolio. Always start with the first draft of your essay. Begin by addressing four issues: 1) who you are. 2) Who/ what do you want to become. 3) How will architecture school help you get there, and 4) How will this SPECIFIC architecture school (GSD, MIT, GSAPP, or whatever you choose) help you achieve your goal. See the process of writing not as an opportunity to use big cool words, because this is not going to be read by admissions advisors (yet). This is an exercise for you and just you to understand yourself, so your vocabulary must be as simple and to the point as you feel comfortable with.

After you are done writing your essay, try to find the key sentences that encapsulate the essence of what you are looking for in your education, how you will contribute, etc. After that, compose a single paragraph that captures your own essence. This paragraph will be the core of your whole application. And after you decide on it, and are happy with it and the idea it communicates, you will proceed to the development of the rest of the material, ALWAYS making sure that everything is connected with / grounded on the core paragraph.

Developing a portfolio is a multistage process, which requires good judgment and thinking, but the first step before developing it is getting the main idea very clearly specified in your head. After that, you can start thinking how and what type of work to develop, or how to arrange and present your already existing work. We will cover that in different articles.

Portfolio Design and strategic Admissions Consulting for Schools of Architecture

Architecture School Admission Strategy: The thing that matters the most

Your strategy is perhaps THE number ONE most important thing in the process of developing an architecture/ design portfolio. Think of it as the initiation phase of any project. Be it in architecture or any other field, the initiation process of the project carries more risk than any other phase. The reason for that is that the it defines the broad strokes/ the trajectory of the whole effort.

 

by Elos

 

Here are a few important things to consider when you develop your strategy:

 

1) Your background:

Your background is the foundation of the whole process of portfolio development, not only because it is very likely that your choices of schools and programs are very likely to be based on your background, but most importantly because your background defines the type of work that you have already developed. No one likes to start from scratch, and even if they do, it is not recommended. Schools want to see what you have accomplished and base their evaluation on whether their mission matches your background.

 

2) The type of work that you have developed:

If you are interested in sustainability yet the work you have produced is hard-core brutalist utopian, then there is a bit of a disconnect between what you say you want and what your work demonstrates. Never forget that your work must be a visual manifestation of all the good stuff that you will discuss in your essay, so there must be some sort of connection between work and intention. If not, it is not the end of the world, but then you will have a bit of a harder time painting a clear picture of yourself. In short, if you manage to somehow connect what you believe interests you and what your work says about you, you will have an advantage over others whose work doesn’t match their interests.

 

3) Your Objectives:

In any journey it is extremely important to have a destination. The same is true for  architecture and design-school applications. It does not mean that you will commit to this destination for the rest of your life of course (well … some of you might), but it is important that you at least set a destination for now. Your destination can be as specific as “I want to be able to develop affordable single-family clay-houses in North African communities”, or as wide open as “I want to be involved in the development of sustainable neighborhoods”. Is there a way to define the perfect objective? Well, the truth is that most schools would not want you to be too specific, because that would mean that you are either narrow-minded or hard to teach. On the other hand, you would not want to appear too out of touch with specifics or reality either. So, the answer lies somewhere in the middle.

 

4) The school(s) that you are applying to:

“Different strokes for different folks”, and in this case “schools” as well. Not all schools offer the same type of programs, not all schools use the same approach to teaching design, and frankly not all schools are flooded with applications from students allover the world. If you are applying to the GSD or MIT SAP, it is highly likely that you will be competing with hundreds of applicants for your spot, which means that you cannot get away with a mediocre portfolio. If you are applying to a program in Design and Build (some schools offer special programs like this) you will have to slightly adjust your application to demonstrate interest in the field, etc. In short: understand the schools you are applying to, find connections between their programs and what you are interested in, and then find common denominators in all of them, according to which you will build ONE portfolio.

Yale University, School of Architecture

P.O. Box 208242 (180 York St.)
New Haven, CT 06520-8242
United StatesMain Phone:             203-432-2288
Fax: 203-432-7175
Web site: www.architecture.yale.edu/
Mr. Robert A. M. Stern, Dean

Admissions

The admission process is designed to enroll students of the highest promise while assuring a wide diversity of backgrounds and aptitudes within the student body.

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OPEN HOUSE

Prospective applicants are encouraged to visit the School during our Open House on Thursday, November 3, 2011. The day’s program offers opportunities to visit classes and design studios, meet informally with faculty and students, tour the School and the University, and attend the School’s evening public lecture given by David Chipperfield, Norman R. Foster Visiting Professor. Interested applicants planning to attend the Open House should register online at www.architecture.yale.edu by November 2, 2011.

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GENERAL ADMISSION REQUIREMENTS

Students matriculate only at the beginning of each academic year. All students are expected to attend full-time.

Notifications of admission and of financial aid award, if applicable, are sent no later than April 1. Acceptance of the offer of admission, including a nonrefundable deposit of $750, must be made electronically by April 15. This deposit will be credited toward tuition. Acceptances may not be deferred.

International students should refer to the chapter International Students for information regarding additional admission requirements.

Visit www.architecture.yale.edu for further information about the School. For admission inquiries, contact gradarch.admissions@yale.edu or telephone            203.432.2296      . For financial aid inquires, contact archfinancialaid@yale.edu or telephone            203.432.2291      .

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M.ARCH. I: THREE-YEAR PROGRAM ADMISSION REQUIREMENTS

Admission to the M.Arch. I program in architecture normally requires the prior possession of a bachelor’s degree, or the equivalent, from an accredited college or university. The following college-level courses are required as prerequisites to this program:

  • 1. Elementary calculus.
  • 2. A studio course such as freehand drawing, sketching, painting, sculpture, or basic architectural design. (Ceramics, photography, graphics, or film will not satisfy this requirement.)
  • 3. Two courses in the history of art and/or architecture. It is recommended that one course be a survey, the other a course in modern architecture.
  • 4. A classical physics course is also recommended but not required.

 

Transfer

Transfer students with exceptional promise may be accepted to the M.Arch. I program under one of the following special conditions:

  • 1. After completion, in high standing, of at least one year in an accredited graduate program in architecture, a student may receive credit for some or all course work.
  • 2. After completion, in high standing, of the fourth year of an accredited five-year undergraduate program in architecture, a student may be accepted into the M.Arch. I program with the following provisions: a minimum of one year to qualify for the B.Arch. degree (retained by the School solely to accommodate those few students needing it as a prerequisite in order to work for the M.Arch. degree, but conferred only upon successful completion of work for the M.Arch. degree) and a minimum of an additional two years to qualify for the M.Arch. degree.

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M.ARCH. II: TWO-YEAR PROGRAM ADMISSION REQUIREMENTS

The prerequisite for admission to the M.Arch. II program is a professional degree in architecture, normally a five-year bachelor of architecture (B.Arch.) degree.

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M.E.D. PROGRAM ADMISSION REQUIREMENTS

The M.E.D. program accepts qualified applicants with a degree in architecture, or with an undergraduate or graduate degree in a related discipline, who exhibit a strong capability for independent advanced study in a topic related to architecture and environmental design.

Candidates are selected on the basis of academic and/or professional records and individual research proposals. (See details on the submission of the research proposal below and in the chapter Master of Environmental Design Degree Program.) Applicants to the M.E.D. program are encouraged to contact the director of the M.E.D. program to arrange an informational interview with faculty in their study topic area, or to submit a draft study proposal before the application deadline.

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THE APPLICATION PROCESS

Applying to the School requires applicants to complete an online Application Form. While completing this form, students will be asked to supply information regarding themselves, their education, and their references; upload their transcripts, personal essay, and curriculum vitae (résumé); and pay an application fee. In addition, applicants for the M.Arch. programs will be required to submit a portfolio, both online and separately in hard copy. Applicants for the M.E.D. program will be required to upload a research proposal. See below for more detailed information on each required component of the application process.

The online application can be accessed atwww.architecture.yale.edu/apply, when it is available. Applications and required portfolios for programs beginning in the 2012–2013 academic year must be submitted no later than January 2, 2012. Applicants will not be allowed to submit applications after the deadline has passed.

Since all required admissions materials must be uploaded to the online application, applicants should not send any materials, other than the hard-copy portfolio (if required), to the School. Any materials, other than the hard-copy portfolio, received directly from an applicant will not be added to the applicant’s admission file.

Once an application has been submitted, applicants can track the status of their application and the receipt of required supporting materials (such as test scores, portfolios, or recommendations) online. Applicants are encouraged to log into the Web site frequently in order to check the status of their application materials and to view correspondence from the admissions office.

Application fee Applications will be considered only when payment of a nonrefundable application fee has been received. For the 2012–2013 academic year the application fee is $85. This fee cannot be waived and cannot be credited to tuition or other accounts upon admission. The only acceptable method of payment of the application fee is by credit or debit card, a transaction that is made within the online application. Wire transfers cannot be accepted.

Transcripts A transcript or academic record indicating degree earned or anticipated is required from each college or university attended and listed in the Academic Record section of the online application. Applicants will need to upload, rather than mail, a scanned copy of the applicant’s official transcript or academic record to the application (please ensure that the scanned copy is legible). Refer to the detailed instructions within the online application regarding transcripts/academic records and uploading. Donot mail in a copy of a transcript or academic record that has been uploaded to the application.

Applicants who have attended international institutions must submit transcripts or certified attestations of study. If such documents are not written in English, certified English translations are required. Once translated, the original transcript as well as the certified translation should be uploaded to the online application.

Applicants expecting to graduate this academic year but still attending their college or university must upload their current college or university transcript to the application.

Applicants who are offered admission and who accept that offer will be required to have their respective institutions submit directly to the School final, hard-copy official transcripts that, if appropriate, also indicate the degree awarded.

Standardized examinations All applicants, including international students, are required to take the General Test (verbal, quantitative, and analytical) of the Graduate Record Examination (GRE) Program of the Educational Testing Service. For information regarding this test, test dates and locations, and/or to arrange to take the test, visit www.ets.org/gre. Although the test may be taken at any time, it should be taken no later than the preceding December.

Beginning August 1, 2011, the Educational Testing Service (ETS) will implement the GRE revised General Test. For detailed information on this new test, visitwww.ets.org/gre. ETS will provide the School with the ability to compare, on an equivalent basis, scores between the old and new tests. Therefore, applicants satisfied with results from tests taken prior to August 1, 2011, do not need to take the new test.

The Internet-based Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL iBT) is required of all applicants whose native language is not English, regardless if the applicant’s prior education was at an institution where English was the primary language of instruction. If the TOEFL iBT is not available in the applicant’s area, the TOEFL that is available plus the Test of Spoken English (TSE) will then be required. If an applicant has submitted an older, non-Internet-based TOEFL score from a test that did not include the TSE and is applying for the 2012–2013 academic year, this must be supplemented with the TSE. For further information regarding these tests and/or to arrange to take the test(s), visit www.toefl.org. The TOEFL must be taken by no later than the preceding December. Applicants whose native language is English are not required to take a TOEFL test.

Applicants must include their required examination scores on the application for each test date taken. Please do not send hard copies.

The Yale School of Architecture institution code number for the GRE, TOEFL iBT, and TSE is 3985. Please note that this is different from other Yale University code numbers. Unless 3985 is used on the test form, applicants’ scores may not reach the School.

Personal essay An essay, not exceeding one page, that includes a brief personal history and reasons for applying is required and must be uploaded to the online application.

The School of Architecture seeks to draw students from all racial and ethnic groups in society. Applicants who wish to identify themselves as a member of a minority group should do so in this essay.

Curriculum vitae A curriculum vitae (résumé of academic and employment experience) is required and must be uploaded to the online application.

Letters of recommendation Three letters of recommendation are required and must be submitted by no later than January 2, 2012. At least one letter of recommendation should be from a person with direct knowledge of the applicant’s professional potential and academic ability.

Recommendations must be submitted by an online process that will require applicants to supply the e-mail addresses of their recommenders in the online application. Once the e-mail addresses are submitted, an automatic e-mail will be sent to the recommenders indicating how to submit their recommendations. Recommendations submitted prior to the submission of the online application will be automatically received at the School when applicants submit their online application.

Portfolio (for the M.Arch. programs only) Two identical versions of the portfolio are required (one printed, hard-copy portfolio version and one digital [.pdf] portfolio version). The hard-copy portfolio (not to exceed nine by twelve inches by one and one-half inches thick) must be sent directly to the School and received by no later than January 2, 2012. The digital portfolio must be a single .pdf document optimized not to exceed 64mb and will need to be uploaded to the online application. The digital portfolio will be viewed on computer screens, so resolution above 150 dpi is not necessary.

The portfolio should be a well-edited representation of the applicant’s creative work. Portfolios may not contain discs or videos. Anything submitted that is not entirely the applicant’s own work must be clearly identified as such.

For the M.Arch. I program, the portfolio should demonstrate the applicant’s drawing skills and three-dimensional aptitude. Work represented may include drawings, paintings, sculpture, sketches, furniture and architectural designs, or other materials.

For the M.Arch. II program, the portfolio should demonstrate the applicant’s ability to pursue advanced work in architectural design.

Use the following addresses for submission of the hard-copy portfolio:

 

via U.S. Postal Service/Air Mail:

Office of Admissions

Yale School of Architecture

PO Box 208242

New Haven CT 06520-8242 USA

via Express Delivery or Courier Services:

Office of Admissions

Yale School of Architecture

180 York Street

New Haven CT 06511-8924

USA

Use the following phone number for express service envelopes or packages:            203.432.2288      .

Due to the large number of portfolios submitted, receipt of your hard-copy portfolio may not be reflected in your online application status until after January 14, 2012.

Research proposal (for the M.E.D. program only) A full and specific description of the applicant’s research proposal is required, including a statement of goals, a proposed study plan, and anticipated results. This submission is weighted heavily during the application review process and is considered in the assignment of faculty advisers. The research proposal will need to be uploaded to the online Application Form.

Preparation of the proposed study plan is an important part of the application process. As a guide to applicants, the following themes should be included in the proposed study plan:

  • 1. Define a specific topic area and the goal of the study plan. List the prior work, publications, or other key references that provide the background or basis of study in the topic.
  • 2. Define the key questions that might be answered or the important issues that would be addressed by the study. Describe proposed study methods and expected results.
  • 3. List the Yale courses that will support the study. Include a tentative schedule or plan of study over the four terms.
  • 4. Describe prior work relevant to the proposed topic, as well as career expectations in undertaking the study. Include examples of written papers, reports, and other documentation that illustrate a capability to carry out the proposed study.

Applicants are invited to submit a draft of the study plan to the M.E.D. program director well in advance of the application deadline, in order to receive comments on it prior to the final application.

Verification of application credentials It is the policy of the School of Architecture to verify all credentials, such as transcripts, recommendations, and standardized test scores, as well as other information submitted in support of an application. By submission of an application, applicants automatically grant consent for such verification. Should it be determined at any time that any credential or other information submitted during the application process has been misrepresented, the University reserves the right to rescind the offer of admission and to prevent registration.

 


 

 

Woodbury University, School of Architecture

7500 Glenoaks Blvd
PO Box 7846
Burbank, CA 91510-7846
United StatesMain Phone:             818-767-0888
Fax: 818-504-9320
E-mail: vic.liptak@woodbury.edu
Web site: http://architecture.woodbury.edu/
Mr. Norman R. Millar, Dean, School of Architecture

MASTER OF ARCHITECTURE
Woodbury School of Architecture offers two Master of Architecture (MArch) programs:3-year professional MArch for students with no prior degree in architecture


2-year professional MArch for students with a pre-professional degree in architecture

The MArch degrees embody a fresh approach to architecture, Los Angeles, and global urban conditions. Within an intimate and immersive program, our innovative coursework trains students to engage in the architectural discourse of the city, making clear-eyed connections between their work, new technologies in both representation and realization, and built and natural environments. Fieldwork, our extensive study-away program, gives students the opportunity to use the world as a research laboratory for their thesis.

Our graduate programs encourage and value all methods of architectural communication: the analog, the digital, the written, the diagrammed, the drawn, the modeled, and the built. We investigate new technologies for representation and building from the position that technology is a means rather than a solution. We believe that there is no craft without knowledge, no technology without theory, no how without why.

The professional programs at Woodbury School of Architecture provide a balance of instruction in studio, representation and visualization, building and construction technologies, and history and theory. During each semester of the foundation, students take a class in each of four realms: studio, building, criticism, and visualization.

This curriculum, together with a course in practice, provides the preparation necessary for a contemporary career in architecture. Other class offerings include advanced electives and skills workshops in topics such as building technology, civic engagement and policy, history and theory, animation and other media.

Students can craft expertise in various disciplinary realms, including building technology, film and media, landscape and urbanism, and real estate and development by accumulating coursework from the multiple campuses and schools. Students and faculty come together to discuss new models of architectural practice, to expand the role of the architect in society, and to question disciplinary boundaries.

Woodbury School of Architecture is a practices lab, bridging the gap between theory and practice, in which acclaimed faculty and their research interests provide frameworks for study.

Students may work within faculty-led initiatives, including:

Arid Lands Institute (ALI)
Architecture+Civic Engagement (ACE) Center
Julius Shulman Institute (JSI)
Rome Center for Architecture and Culture (RCAC)

ACCREDITATION

Chroma-Scapes Carwash
Student : Brittany Jackson . Instructor : Gary Paige .

Prospective Graduate Architecture Los Angeles Student Fact Sheet

Graduate Architecture Application

Application deadline extended (but with limited seats available).  Admissions priority is given to completed applications.  Contact Graduate Architecture Admissions for more information.

APPLY HERE.

Los Angeles Graduate Architecture admissions inquiries should be directed to :
Glisery Colon
818.252.5234
glisery (dot) colon (at) woodbury (dot) edu .

Graduate Architecture Admissions Events

Graduate Architecture Courses (Los Angeles)
The professional graduate programs at Woodbury University School of Architecture (Burbank | Los Angeles) provide a balance of instruction in studio, representation andvisualizationbuilding and construction, and history and theory criticism.  In the final year of study, they parallel the specialized research projects of the post-professional program, which enables students to acquire an expertise in a maturing collection of focused topics like alternative practice and entrepreneurship, landscape (and) urbanism, and building technology.

Graduate Architecture Curriculum Map

Fall 2011 Course Schedule

 

 

Western Technical College

400 Seventh Street North
La Crosse, WI 54601
United StatesMain Phone:             608-785-9150
Web site: http://www.westerntc.edu/
Mr. Michael Poellinger, Instructor

HOW TO APPLY FOR ADMISSIONS

1Complete the online admission form and the $30 one-time nonrefundable application fee. (Fee is subject to change.) Apprentices, Farm Business and Production Management program students, and undeclared students (student who have not declared a program of study), are not required to pay the application fee or submit the application.


2Submit official transcripts from high school and from all previous colleges and universities attended. If the high school transcript is submitted prior to graduation from high school, an official final transcript must be sent after graduation.

As a new student, you may have already earned college credit before ever taking a class at Western. Western grants credit for everything from classes taken at other institutions to military experience. Fill out the Transfer Credit Evaluation Form to find out if you have already earned college credit.

GED/HSED or Ability to Benefit scores may be substituted for the high school graduation requirement. Non-high school graduates without a GED/HSED are required to take the Ability to Benefit. For further information regarding the GED/HSED or Ability to Benefit, please contact the GOAL counselor at Western,             608.785.9536      .


3Complete the ACT, ASSET or COMPASS, a series of basic skills tests. ASSET or COMPASS is required of all program students except Farm Business and Production Management program students, and it is not required of apprentices and undeclared students. Though testing may not be required for undeclared students, please be aware that test scores may be required for individual classes. Also, undeclared students are not eligible for Financial Aid. Learn more about ASSET or COMPASS

There is a $20 charge for the initial admissions test session and $10.00 charge for each retest session scheduled. For more information, call             608.785.9566      . Students will be asked to provide their social security number at the time of testing. A picture identification is required. Students needing special accommodations to take the ASSET or COMPASS should call at least one week prior to testing-call the instructional support specialist or the V/TTY number,             608.785.9551      .

You may not have to take the ASSET or COMPASS if you have ASSET, COMPASS or ACT scores dated within the last five years, or applicable post secondary credits with a C grade or better. If you have taken the ACT, ASSET or COMPASS within the last five years, you can request that your scores be submitted to Western.


4Admission requirements vary from program to program.

Once all required admissions materials have been received, students will receive a letter indicating one of the following:

  • Acceptance into the program or
  • Placement onto a waiting list to which the student has applied for or
  • Admission to take general course while completing program admission requirements.

When an acceptance letter is received, a position is reserved for that student up to the assigned date of registration. Positions not filled on the assigned registration date may be released. Acceptance does not guarantee a starting date at the next time of entry for programs where capacity has been reached.

If you have questions or need additional information, please contact the Enrollment Services Office in La Crosse either by email at EnrollServices@westerntc.edu or by calling             608.785.9553      , or the Western Regional Location nearest you:

  • Black River Falls             715.284.2253
  • Independence             715.985.3392
  • Mauston             608.847.7364
  • Sparta             608.269.1611
  • Tomah             608.374.7700
  • Viroqua             608.637.2612

 

 

Wentworth Institute of Technology, Department of Architecture

550 Huntington Avenue
Boston, MA 02115
United StatesMain Phone:             617-989-4450
Fax: 617-989-4591
Web site: http://www.wit.edu/arch/
Mr. Glenn Wiggins, Head

Department Mission Statement

Architectural education at Wentworth embraces the complex nature of architecture as a conceptual, technical, and social practice that is ultimately centered on the art of making. The program encourages deep explorations in the material culture of architecture and challenges students to deploy this knowledge in ways that enrich the built environment and enhance people’s lives.

Degree Programs

Bachelor of Science in Architecture (BS-Arch) pre-professional degree in architecture.

Master of Architecture (M.Arch) professional degree in architecture; fully accredited by the National Architectural Accrediting Board (NAAB). (See ‘Accreditation’)

The architecture program at Wentworth is structured as a four-year (ten semester) pre-professional degree (BS-Arch.) followed by a one-year (two semester) professional degree (M.Arch) The Bachelor of Science in Architecture is comprised of eight semesters of on-campus curriculum plus two semesters of co-op work experience. The one-year graduate-level program provides the basis for awarding the Master of Architecture degree. The Department also offers a two-year program leading to a Master of Architecture degree (M.Arch) for students holding a 4-year NAAB-based pre-professional degree from another institution.

Upon successful completion of the BS-Arch curriculum, Wentworth students may apply to the MArch program at Wentworth, or may elect to continue their architectural studies elsewhere or to gain professional experience. Admission to the MArch program is based on a portfolio submission, GPA, a statement of intent and references (see Application Process). Students will complete their MArch program in the same academic concentration as their BS-Arch.

Students applying to the M. Arch program who have successfully completed a four-year NAAB-based program elsewhere will be eligible to complete the MArch at Wentworth in four semesters, contingent upon the department’s evaluation of their prior coursework.

Undergraduate Studies – Architecture (BSA)

Leading to a Bachelor of Science in Architecure degree (BS-Arch)

Program Description

The Bachelor of Science in Architecture (BS-Arch) program’s rigorous course of study centers on the design studio, where students work closely with faculty in explorations of design and design methods. Associated courses in history, theory, technology, and professional practice are closely related to design studio problems. Student learning is enhanced by two semesters of cooperative work experience as well as study abroad options.

All entering freshmen are admitted to the four-year BS-Arch program. At the end of the sophomore year students focus their educational interests by choosing one of the three concentrations outlined below. The concentrations are not divergent areas of study, but rather run parallel to each other and allow students to pursue a particular focus within their study of architecture.

Foundation curriculum: The first two years of the BS-Arch program provide a broad introduction to the field of architecture and serve as the common core for all concentrations. Lecture courses convey an overview of the field – history, theory, technology, and practice – while studio courses focus on graphic skills, design fundamentals, and conceptual understanding of materials, structure, building tectonics and environmental responsiveness. The department‘s emphasis on both the art and the science of architecture is stressed throughout this introductory curriculum.

Upper level curriculum: The third and fourth years of the BS-Arch program build on the skills and knowledge of the first two years while introducing students to more complex and varied studio topics – including building tectonics, site and environmental design, comprehensive design and community design – as well as structures, environmental systems and professional practice. Studio content is closely coordinated with co-requisite courses, encouraging students to make connections between subjects and to develop a well-synthesized approach to design. Concentration-specific coursework allows students to develop an area of focus within a broad-based architectural education. (see ‘Program Concentrations’)

Upon successful completion of the BS-Arch curriculum, Wentworth students may apply to the M. Arch program at Wentworth, or they may elect to continue their architectural studies at another institution or gain professional experience. Admission to the M. Arch program is based on application, including a portfolio submission. (see ‘Application Process’)

BS-Arch Program Concentrations

The undergraduate program in architecture offers three areas of concentration, which allow students to pursue a particular focus within their study of architecture. The core architectural education is equivalent across concentrations, and all achieve the same learning outcomes. Students express their preference of concentrations at the end of their second year. (see “Concentration Selection Process”)

Form and Culture/FC

This concentration explores the influence of the art and theory on architecture and design. Seen through the lens of history and cultural expression, traditional and emerging design methods are analyzed and engaged.

Tectonic Studies/TS

This concentration emphasizes the tangible, material nature of architecture, encompassing the art and science of making buildings. Students gain an in-depth knowledge of the materials and their corresponding assemblies in order to better inform design.

Built Environment/BE

This concentration facilitates an understanding of the social and cultural fabric of the city and its inhabitants. It provides students with the skills and insight to make positive contributions to cities and communities.

BS-ARCH Concentration Selection Process

Second-year students are required to submit a portfolio as part of the process of concentration selection. Students confer in advance with their academic advisor and studio faculty about which concentration best suits their interests and career goals. Placement in concentrations will be based upon a combination of a student‘s departmental GPA (ARCH courses only) and a portfolio evaluation by department faculty. Submission deadlines and portfolio requirements are announced by the department each year

Cooperative Work Experience

The Architecture Department has a substantial and well-established cooperative education component embedded in the curriculum. BS-Arch students spend two semesters working in an architectural or allied design professional office. The department collaborates with the Institute‘s Career Center to reinforce the learning content of these placements, and work experience may be applied to the Intern Development Program (IDP) – a required step towards professional licensure.

Study Abroad Programs

The Department of Architecture offers several one-semester study abroad options for students in the BS-Arch program. Curriculum during this semester is fully aligned with required program coursework in Boston, allowing normal progress towards graduation. Participation is by application; the program accepts a limited number of students and is selective.

The department currently sponsors study abroad programs in Berlin and the south of France, led by resident architects who are Wentworth faculty members. During their residence abroad students work closely with local design and planning professionals as well as with local students and community groups. The program includes intensive travel-based coursework, which gives students additional cultural perspective.

The Architecture Department also has an agreement with The Universidad Central de Venezuela in Caracas, Venezuela, which provides the opportunity for interchange of students via co-op or focused travel / study programs.

SPECIAL GRADE REQUIREMENT

1.  The Architecture Department has a special grade requirement that applies to all design studio courses from the sophomore year onward. Students in the BS-Arch degree program must comply with the following design studio grade requirement:

Final grade must be C or better if the final grade in the previous design studio is less than a C.

Students who receive a final grade below C for two consecutive semesters are not permitted to continue in the program until they successfully repeat the 2nd studio for which they received a sub-standard grade.

2. Students in the BS-Arch program must maintain a minimum departmental GPA of 2.5 (non-elective ARCH courses only) and an overall GPA of 2.0 to be in good academic standing.

Freshman Year

Fall Semester Course R L C
ARCH115 Survey of Architecture I 3 0 3
ARCH155 Design Principles I 2 4 4
ENGL100 English I 4 0 4
MATH205 College Mathematics I 3 2 4
Total 13 4 15
Spring Semester Course R L C
ARCH165 Survey of Architecture II 3 0 3
ARCH175 Design Principles II 2 4 4
ENGL115 English II 3 0 3
MATH250 Precalculus 4 0 4
PHYS210 College Physics I 3 2 4
Total 15 6 18

Sophomore Year

Fall Semester Course R L C
ARCH235 Materials and Methods I 4 0 4
ARCH245 Architectural Design and Technology I 0 12 6
ELECTIVE Lower Level Social Science Elective 3 0 3
LITR445 Literature and the Modern Age 4 0 4
Total 11 12 17
Spring Semester Course R L C
ARCH335 Materials and Methods II 4 0 4
ARCH345 Architectural Design and Technology I 0 12 6
ELECTIVE Upper Level Humanities or Social Science Elective* 4 0 4
HUMN150 Art and Theory 4 0 4
ENGL350 Writing Competency Assessment 0 0 0
Total 12 12 18

Form and Culture Concentration – Junior Year

Fall Semester Course R L C
ARCH402 History of Architecture I 3 0 3
ARCH456 Studio III: Tectonics 0 12 6
ARCH481 Structures I 3 0 3
ARCH482 Site Planning and Landscape 3 0 3
ELECTIVE Architectural Elective 4 0 4
ARCH370 IDP Registration 0
13 12 19
Spring Semester Course R L C
ARCH502 History of Architecture II 3 0 3
ARCH516 Studio IV: Site & Environment 0 12 6
ARCH528 Environmental Systems 3 0 3
ELECTIVE Architectural Elective 4 0 4
10 12 16
Summer Semester Course R L C
COOP400 Co-op Work Semester I 0

Form and Culture Concentration – Senior Year

Fall Semester Course R L C
ARCH554 Theory Studies 3 0 3
ARCH556 Studio V: Comprehensive Design (Study Abroad) 0 12 6
ELECTIVE Architectural Elective 4 0 4
ELECTIVE Upper Level Humanities or Social Science Elective* 4 0 4
11 12 17
Spring Semester Course R L C
ARCH531 Structures II 3 0 3
ARCH625 Professional Practice I: Contract Documents 4 0 4
ARCH656 Studio VI: Community Design 0 12 6
ELECTIVE Upper Level Humanities or Social Science Elective* 4 0 4
Total 11 12 17
Summer Semester Course R L C
COOP600 Co-op Work Semester II 0

Tectonic Studies – Junior Year

Fall Semester Course R L C
ARCH406 History of Architecture I 3 0 3
ARCH467 Studio III: Tectonics 0 12 6
ARCH481 Structures I 3 0 3
ARCH528 Environmental Systems 3 0 3
ELECTIVE Architectural Elective 4 0 4
ARCH370 IDP Registration 0
Total 13 12 19
Spring Semester Course R L C
COOP 400 Co-op Work Semester I 0
Summer Semester Course R L C
ARCH482 Site Planning and Landscape 3 0 3
ARCH517 Studio IV: Site & Environment 0 12 6
ARCH604 History of Architecture II 3 0 3
ELECTIVE Upper Level Humanities or Social Science Elective* 4 0 4
Total 10 12 16

Tectonic Studies – Senior Year

Fall Semester Course R L C
COOP 600 Co-op Work Semester II 0
Spring Semester Course R L C
ARCH558 Material Studies 3 0 3
ARCH567 Studio V: Comprehensive Design (Study Abroad) 0 12 6
ELECTIVE Architectural Elective 4 0 4
ELECTIVE Upper Level Humanities or Social Science Elective* 4 0 4
Total 11 12 17
Summer Semster R L C
ARCH531 Structures II 3 0 3
ARCH625 Professional Practice I: Contract Documents 4 0 4
ARCH667 Studio VI: Community Design 0 12 6
ELECTIVE Architectural Elective 4 0 4
Total 11 12 17

Built Environment Concentration – Junior Year

Fall Semester Course R L C
ARCH408 History of Architecture I 3 0 3
ARCH469 Studio III: Tectonics 0 12 6
ARCH481 Structures I 3 0 3
ARCH528 Environmental Systems 3 0 3
ELECTIVE Architectural Elective 4 0 4
ARCH370 IDP Registration 0 0 0
13 12 19
Spring Semester Course R L C
COOP 400 Co-op Work Semester I 0
Summer Semester Course R L C
ARCH482 Site Planning and Landscape 3 0 3
ARCH519 Studio IV: Site & Environment 0 12 6
ARCH606 History of Architecture II 3 0 3
ELECTIVE Upper Level Humanities or Social Science Elective* 4 0 4
10 12 16

Built Environment Concentration – Senior Year

Fall Semester Course R L C
COOP 600 Co-op Work Semester II 0
Spring Semester Course R L C
ARCH560 Urban Studies 3 0 3
ARCH569 Studio V: Comprehensive Design (Study Abroad) 0 12 6
ELECTIVE Architectural Elective 4 0 4
ELECTIVE Upper Level Humanities or Social Science Elective* 4 0 4
11 12 17
Summer Semester Course R L C
ARCH531 Structures II 3 0 3
ARCH625 Professional Practice I: Contract Documents 4 0 4
ARCH669 Studio VI: Community Design 0 12 6
ELECTIVE Architectural Elective 4 0 4
11 12 17

R=Class Hours Per Week, L=Lab Hours Per Week, C=Semester Credit Hours
* Please refer to the upper level humanities/social sciences elective requirement.

Graduate Studies – Architecture (MARC): Leading to a Master of Architecture degre (M. Arch)

The Master of Architecture program at Wentworth provides graduates with the insight, skills, and perspective to pursue distinguished and rewarding careers in architecture and the allied design fields while also supplying the academic credential required for registration as an architect. Graduate study in architecture is an exhilarating and challenging enterprise, an opportunity for students to develop a focused position within a broad and rapidly evolving field. The graduate curriculum promotes research and design investigations on the linkages between theoretical frameworks, design intentions, and the tangible, material nature of architecture. A rigorous process of critical thinking is instilled through studios, seminars, and thesis preparation coursework. The program is structured as a one-year sequence of study for internal candidates and a two-year sequence of study for external candidates with a Bachelors of Science Degree in Architecture from an NAAB accredited program.

M.Arch Degree Program Application Process

Fourth-year BS-Arch students at Wentworth who wish to continue in the architecture program, and outside applicants from other 4-year NAAB-based pre-professional degree programs are required to submit an application for the MArch degree program (see ‘Note’ below). For further details on the program and admissions requirements please refer to the departmental web site (http://www.wit.edu/arch/programs/academic/march/index.html)

Note: Students who achieve a minimum departmental GPA of 3.2 (non-elective ARCH courses from 1st through 3rdyears only) in the BS-Arch program at Wentworth will qualify to be automatically accepted into the M.Arch degree program for the following year. Students meeting this standard must submit only an application form and an official transcript.

SPECIAL GRADING REQUIREMENT

 Students in the M. Arch program must maintain a grade of B or higher in all required architecture courses to be in good academic standing

Curriculum for One Year M. Arch

Fall Semester R L C
ARCH916 Studio VII: Special Topics 0 12 6
ARCH926 Thesis Preparation I: Research Methods 4 0 4
ARCH936 Thesis Preparation II: Project Development 4 0 4
ELECTIVE General Elective 4 0 4
12 12 18
Spring Semester R L C
ARCH825 Professional Practice II: Project Management 4 0 4
ARCH956 Studio VIII: Thesis 0 12 6
ARCH976 Advanced Topics 4 0 4
ELECTIVE Architectural Elective 4 0 4
12 12 18

Curriculum for Two Year M. Arch*

Year One

Fall Semester R L C
ARCH900 Graduate Studio I 0 12 6
ARCH554 Theory Studies 3 0 3
ELECTIVE Architectural Elective 4 0 4
ELECTIVE Architectural Elective 4 0 4
11 12 17
Spring Semester R L C
ARCH910 Graduate Studio II 0 12 6
ARCH558 or Material Studies 3 0 3
ARCH560 Urban Studies
ARCH625 Professional Practice I: Contract Documents 4 0 4
ARCH976 Advanced Topics 4 0 4
Total 11 12 17

Year Two

Fall Semester R L C
ARCH916 Studio VII: Special Topics 0 12 6
ARCH926 Thesis Preparation I: Research Methods 4 0 4
ARCH936 Thesis Preparation II: Project Development 4 0 4
ELECTIVE General Elective 4 0 4
12 12 18
Spring Semester R L C
ARCH825 Professional Practice II: Project Management 4 0 4
ARCH956 Studio VIII: Thesis 0 12 6
ARCH976 Advanced Topics 4 0 4
ELECTIVE Architectural Elective 4 0 4
Total 12 12 18

R=Class Hours Per Week, L=Lab Hours Per Week, C=Semester Credit Hours
*Proposed

Architecture Electives

Architecture Electives are listed below by concentration (and other) categories to assist students in shaping their course of study. Students are not required to choose electives within their area of concentration, and are encouraged to pursue breadth as well as depth in their architectural studies.

The following list indicates the Department’s elective offerings during the last three years:

Form and Culture

ARCH435 Design Methods ARCH590 Heroic Modernism
ARCH449 Constructing Sacred Space ARCH590 Informal Architecture
ARCH453 History of Architectural Ornament ARCH590 The Modern House
ARCH554 Theory Studies ARCH590 The Other American Moderns
ARCH590 Architectural Proportion ARCH590 Perception & Human Factors in Architecture
ARCH590 Conception and Representation ARCH590 Scandinavia
ARCH590 Design Thinking ARCH590 Survey of Computational Design
ARCH590 Generative Design Computing ARCH 590 Why Architects Have Drawn

Tectonic Studies

ARCH432 Environmental Acoustics and Lighting ARCH590 Constructing Engagements
ARCH433 Tectonics and Design ARCH590 Design Computing & Digital Fabrication
ARCH558 Material Studies ARCH590 Materials in Design
ARCH590 Architecture, Energy, People ARCH590 Plastic Geometries: Intro to NURBS Modeling
ARCH590 Bridge Architecture and Design ARCH590 Sustainable Design
ARCH590 Building Information Modeling in Arch. ARCH590 Switzerland
ARCH590 Caveats of Digital Design ARCH590 Visualization & Interpretation in Architecture
ARCH590 Computer-Based Structural Analysis & Design

Built Environment

ARCH560 Urban Studies ARCH590 Italy
ARCH566 Latin American Architecture & Landscape ARCH590 Mapping the City
ARCH590 Architecture, Energy, People ARCH590 Transitions in Religious Architecture in Asia Minor
ARCH590 Boston, the City and the Sea ARCH590 Transportation Intervention & Urban / Community Design
ARCH590 Building the City of the Future ARCH590 Urban Infrastructure
ARCH590 Community Development as Urban Design ARCH590 Urban Retrofit
ARCH590 Cultural Heritage & Urban Development ARCH590 Vernacular Architecture
ARCH590 Introduction to Urban Design & Planning ARCH590 Visual Perception & the City: The Lessons of Boston

Representation

ARCH590 Architectural Analysis ARCH590 Color Relations in Painting
ARCH590 Architectural Photography ARCH590 Drawing and Thinking
ARCH590 Architecture Rendering: Color Techniques ARCH590 Hand Drawing for Architects and Designers
ARCH590 BIM & Advanced Representational Media ARCH590 Sculpture

Professional Practice

ARCH537 Project Planning ARCH627 Fundamentals of Design Finance
ARCH590 Design Entrepreneurship

 

 

Washington University in St. Louis, Sam Fox School of Design & Visual Arts / Architecture Programs

Campus Box 1079
One Brookings Drive
St. Louis, MO 63130-4899
United StatesMain Phone:             314-935-6200
Fax: 314-935-7656
Web site: http://www.arch.wustl.edu/
Bruce Lindsey, Dean

The primary considerations for undergraduate admission are your artistic and intellectual promise and your academic record. You must have graduated from high school, received an evaluation from your teachers or other responsible officials of the school, and taken an appropriate distribution of high school subjects.

To apply for Freshman Admission, submit the Common Application (or Universal College Application) and our Pre-Application Data Sheet to:

Office of Undergraduate Admissions
Washington University in St. Louis
Campus Box 1089
One Brookings Drive
St. Louis, Missouri 63130-4899

Your application must be accompanied by a $55 nonrefundable application fee. You must also submit your official secondary school transcript, a teacher evaluation, SAT or ACT scores, and essay. Application forms and full instructions are available at Washington University’s Undegraduate Admissions website.

For more information call             800.638.0700       (within the USA) or            314.935.6000      , or e-mail admissions@wustl.edu.

Optional Portfolio

We encourage you to submit a portfolio of completed artwork. A portfolio is optional for first-year admission; it is required for consideration for an academic scholarship. If you elect to submit a portfolio, follow these instructions: Submit a digital portfolio, consisting of 12–15 pieces of recent work, which may include drawings, two- and three-dimensional pieces, or photographs.

Digital Portfolio: Submit images as a simple, non-timed PowerPoint presentation. Also include all of the work in the presentation, in a separate folder, as jpegs saved at no higher than 150 dpi resolution. Write your name and address on the CD/DVD—DO NOT use a stick-on label. Remember to include an accompanying inventory/contact sheet showing thumbnails of all work on the CD/DVD. The inventory sheet must include your name and address. If preferred, you may include additional information such as title of work, medium, dimensions, and date completed.

Mail your portfolio to:
Office of Undergraduate Admissions
Washington University in St. Louis
Campus Box 1089
One Brookings Drive
St. Louis, Missouri 63130-4899

We welcome the opportunity to review your portfolio at a National Portfolio Day. Representatives from the Sam Fox School attend National Portfolio Days across the country; in addition, the School is hosting a Portfolio Day on its campus Sunday, October 30, 2011. For more information, including a list of schools attending WU’s Portfolio Day, will be coming soon.

You may also set up a personal visit to Washington University and have your work reviewed in the College of Art. A portfolio review gives you a chance to have immediate feedback and gain insight about your work. However, a digital portfolio is still required if you would like to be considered for a scholarship.

Transfer Admission

The College of Architecture accepts a very limited number of transfer students from other colleges and universities or from within the University. To apply for admission as a transfer student, please contact:

Office of Undergraduate Admissions
Washington University in St. Louis
Campus Box 1089
One Brookings Drive
St. Louis, Missouri 63130-4899
Phone:             314.935.6000       or             800.638.0700       (within continental United States)
Fax: 314.935.4290

Non-Discrimination Policy

Washington University encourages and gives full consideration to all applicants for admission, financial aid, and employment. The University does not discriminate in access to, or treatment or employment in, its programs and activities on the basis of race, color, age, religion, gender, sexual orientation, gender identity or expression, national origin, veteran status, disability, or genetic information. Inquiries about compliance should be addressed to the University’s Vice Chancellor for Human Resources, Washington University, Campus Box 1184, One Brookings Drive, St. Louis, MO 63130.

The application period for graduate study in Architecture, Landscape Architecture, and Urban Design beginning in fall 2012 has closed. The online application form for fall 2013 admission will be available in September 2012.

Application materials are outlined below. To download a pdf version of the instruction sheet for application and financial aid from our most recent admissions cycle,

Please note: Applications for spring enrollment are only available for advanced-standing MArch candidates, and are due by October 1; visit the MArch 2 program page for requirements.

All application materials that need to be mailed in hard-copy form (transcripts, GRE scores, portfolio, etc.) should be sent to the following address:

Office of Graduate Admissions
Graduate School of Architecture & Urban Design
Sam Fox School of Design & Visual Arts
Washington University in St. Louis
Campus Box 1079
Givens Hall, Room 105
One Brookings Drive
St. Louis, MO 63130

If you would like to receive our printed Graduate Programs bulletin and be added to our mailing list, please contact Kathleen O’Donnell, Graduate Programs Administrative Coordinator. If you have questions about the graduate program curricula, please contact Peter MacKeith, Associate Dean of the Sam Fox School and Director of Graduate Admissions.

Phone:             314.935.6227       or             800.295.6227       (within continental United States)
Fax: 314.935.7656
wuarch@samfox.wustl.edu

Further information to assist applicants in their preparations is provided below.

Washington University in St. Louis encourages and gives full consideration to all applicants for admission, financial aid, and employment. The University does not discriminate in access to, or treatment or employment in, its programs and activities on the basis of race, color, age, religion, gender, sexual orientation, gender identity or expression, national origin, veteran status, disability or genetic information.

Courses Prior to Enrollment

MArch 3 applicants are asked to demonstrate satisfactory completion of one course each of elementary calculus and college physics prior to enrollment. These courses assure adequate preparation for the architectural structures sequence that is required of all MArch students. Through the portfolio, MArch 3 applicants are asked to demonstrate ability and experience in freehand drawing and/or two- or three-dimensional basic design exercises.

MLA applicants must demonstrate satisfactory completion of at least one college-level course in the natural sciences and at least one college-level course in the visual arts, such as drawing, sculpture, graphics, and/or basic design. Applicants with an accredited degree in landscape architecture or architecture may be admitted to the MLA program with advanced placement. Applicants who have received a non-accredited degree in architecture, landscape architecture, or environmental design may also receive advanced placement of one or two semesters, upon review of the admissions committee.

Required Application Materials

The following application materials may be submitted in stages; we may receive any of the hard-copy items before or after you have started the online application process. All of the following materials must be submitted by the application deadline. No applicant will be considered for admission until all required items have been received.

1. Completed online application materials: 
– Personal information.
– A statement of intention of educational and career goals.
– A resume/curriculum vita (to include education and employment history,
honors, awards, and extracurricular activities).
– Three letters of recommendation, to be completed by individuals who know the
personal and academic qualities of the applicant (preferably—although not
necessarily—academic instructors). These three letters must be submitted
through the online application process. Please note that, along with other
contact information, you will need to provide each recommender’s accurate
e-mail address. A fourth recommendation can be included; contact our office
with the name and contact information (including e-mail address) for the
additional recommender.

2. A non-refundable $75 application fee, either paid by credit card online, or by check or money order, made payable to Washington University.

3. Official transcripts from each college and/or university attended. Photocopies or digital copies can only be accepted when endorsed with an official stamp or seal and an appropriate official signature. Please arrange to have the official transcript(s) submitted in hard-copy form in a sealed envelope, and sent directly to our office; the mailing address is listed above.

4. GRE scores (provided by the testing services). To ensure official test score reports arrive as needed, please use our institution code (6929) and department code (4401) when making arrangements with the testing agency.

5. A bound portfolio showing examples of design work or work in the visual arts

6. A Test for English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL) score is required if the applicant’s native language is not English. For non-native English speakers, a minimum TOEFL score of 550 on the paper-based test, 213 on the computer-based test, or 80 on the Internet-based test is required for admission. An exception is made for candidates who have studied four years toward a baccalaureate degree in the United States. To ensure official test score reports arrive as needed, please use our institution code (6929) and department code (12) when making arrangements with the testing agency.

Portfolio

All applicants must submit a printed and bound portfolio to the Office of Graduate Admissions. The portfolio is the most important part of the application to the graduate program. The work presented in the portfolio—whether drawings, paintings, models, sculpture, photography, furniture, or small construction projects—should be the best examples of the applicant’s efforts.

– Applicants who have never studied architecture must submit at least 20 examples of work in the visual and constructive arts that demonstrate a potential for accomplishment in further creative study.

– All applicants who have pursued formal studies in architecture or landscape architecture must include examples of their design work related to those areas of pursuit but are also encouraged to include examples of other artistic endeavors.

– Portfolios must be presented in a protected format (e.g., boxed, in a ring binder, or bound), with dimensions no larger than 9″ x 12″. Bulky items such as fabricated metal or wooden boxes or binders are not allowed.

– The layout of the portfolio should be clear, with brief descriptions for each piece or project.

– Applicants submitting work done collaboratively, either in school or in the profession, should clearly indicate the level of their personal contribution.

– All work should be produced in high-resolution digital images. Original pieces of art (ie., actual drawings or paintings) should not be submitted.

Important: A self-addressed stamped envelope (SASE) with adequate postage must be included when sending the portfolio to ensure its return. Portfolios will not be returned without a SASE.

Dual Degree Applications

To gain admission to a dual degree program involving another division of the University (e.g., Social Work, Business, or Construction Management), students must submit separate applications to and gain admission from both programs. Each program makes admission decisions independently. For further information about dual degree programs,

Financial Aid

Financial aid forms are due by February 15 for all applicants who plan to enroll in the fall semester; spring semester applicants must submit their financial aid forms by October 1. For information about the financial aid application process,

 

 

 

Washington State University, School of Architecture & Construction Management

P.O. Box 642220
Pullman, WA 99164-2220
United StatesMain Phone:             509-335-5539
Fax: 509-335-6132
E-mail: cgana@acm.wsu.edu
Web site: www.arch.wsu.edu
Gregory A. Kessler, Professor and Director

Master of Architecture Program

The School of Architecture and Construction Management offers an accredited (NAAB) Master of Architecture degree. Once completed, this degree allows students to participate in an architect internship program and qualify for the State Architecture Licensing exam. (Note that most states require an accredited degree by the National Architectural Accrediting Board (NAAB) in order to take the licensing exam.)

The accredited graduate program at WSU offers three different tracks for completing the Master of Architecture degree. Track 1 is a 1 ½ year program (3 semesters plus summer) and is specifically for students that have a four year undergraduate Bachelor of Science in Architectural Studies from WSU or a professional accredited degree (B Arch) from a university in the U.S. Track 2 is a 2 ½ year (5 semesters plus summer) program that is available for students who have a four year undergraduate pre-professional degree in architecture from a U.S. university or its equivalent. Track 2 is also available for students who need additional coursework and or additional studio work. Track 3 is a 3 ½ year (7 semesters plus summer) program for students who have an undergraduate degree in a non architectural field. Determination for admission into Track 1 or Track 2 is based upon accomplishments and skills in previous course work and design as demonstrated through the student portfolio.

The Master of Architecture is offered at both the Pullman and Spokane campuses. Typically Track 1 and 3 are located at the Pullman campus. Track 2 students study at the Spokane campus. Specific first year coursework for Track 2 students will be based upon previous academic experience.

Master of Architecture students will engage in course work in studio, site design, technology, history and theory. The culmination of graduate study is a two semester graduate studio project. It is expected that the project be based on a defined hypothesis and demonstrate a comprehensive understanding and solution to a particular issue in architecture.

National Architectural Accrediting Board Statement

In the United States , most state registration boards require a degree from an accredited professional degree program as a prerequisite for licensure. The National Architectural Accrediting Board (NAAB), which is the sole agency authorized to accredit U.S. professional degree programs in architecture, recognizes three types of degrees: the Bachelor of Architecture, the Master of Architecture, and the Arch D in Architecture. A program may be granted a 6-year, 3-year, or 2-year term of accreditation, depending on the extent of its conformance with established educational standards.

Master’s degree programs may consist of a preprofessional undergraduate degree and a professional graduate degree that, when earned sequentially, constitute an accredited professional education. However, the preprofessional degree is not, by itself, recognized as an accredited degree.

 

Admission

Selection of Master of Architecture students is highly selective and is made during the spring semester with initial coursework beginning the following fall semester (All applicants must submit application materials to be received by January 10th). Notification of acceptance will be on or before April 15th. Contact School of Architecture and Construction Management (            509.335.5539      )or access website for detailed requirements regarding transcripts, portfolio, application forms, etc.

Master of Architecture Curriculum (final 3 semesters plus summer)

Note: Curriculum does not show Track 2 or Track 3 required undergraduate coursework as it is individually determined by an Admissions Committee based on applicant’s previous degrees and relevant coursework.

Fall: Semester one – 15 credits (Exact sequence of non studio courses may vary)

Design IX Arch 510 Graduate Studio 6cr
Arch 527 Landscape Design 3cr
Arch 525 Contempoary Theory 3cr
Arch 563 Structures III 3cr

 

Spring: Semester two – 15 credits

Design X Graduate Project 6cr
Arch 531 Advanced Tectonics 3cr
Arch 525 Ethics and Practice 3cr
Elective 3cr

 

Summer – 4 credits

Arch 580 Internship 4cr

 

Fall – Semester three – 12 credits

Design XI Graduate Project 6cr
Arch 542 Criticism in Arch 3cr
Elective 3cr

 

Graduate Course Descriptions

Arch

510 Design Studio 6 Prereq Arch 403. Faculty directed studio for first semester students in the 1.5 year program.

511 Design VIII/Graduate Design Project 6 (0-12) Prereq Arch 403. Studio course focuses on preliminary design of graduate project.

513 Graduate Design Project 6 (0-12) Prereq Arch 511,515. Final graduate design studio focusing on individualized topics.

525 History & Theory 3 History and theory of 20th Century Architecture focusing on cultural philosophical principles related to design.

527 Site and Landscape Design 3 Exploration of issues of site context analysis, topography, planning and landscape design.

531 Advanced Tectonics 3 Prereq Arch 330, 403. Tectonic theory of concrete and metal construction with focus on skin design and technology as formative elements in architecture.

542 Issues in Architecture 3 Prereq graduate standing; Arch 409, 525. Examination of issues in architecture related to society, culture, environment, politics and philosophy.

563 Structures III 3 Prereq Arch 351, 352. Wind and seismic loads on architectural structures; high-rise structure systems; reinforced con-crete and masonry structures.

570 6 Fall semester graduate design studio 2.5 year program.

571 6 Spring semester graduate design studio 2.5 year program.

573 Ethics & Practice 3 Prereq Arch 472. Ethical and professional practice issues related to the business and practice of architecture; investigations into marketing Client and business orientation.

577 Theories and Methods of Urban Construction 3 Prereq graduate standing. Morphology, theoretical concepts, planning and spatial structure of cities and analysis of the transformation of the city core in Europe and America.

580 Architecture Internship 4 Prereq graduate student in M. Arch degree program. Placement in an approved industrial, professional, or governmental position for specialized or general experience.

Download the application

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Virginia Tech, School of Architecture + Design

201 Cowgill Hall (0205)
Blacksburg, VA 24061
United StatesMain Phone:             540-231-5383
Web site: http://www.archdesign.vt.edu
William U. Galloway, Associate Professor of Architecture

undergraduate admissions

All applications for admission to undergraduate programs within the School of Architecture + Design must be completed through the Virginia Tech Undergraduate Admissions office.

Application Materials for Prospective Freshman (U.S. Applicants)

Application Materials for Prospective External Transfer Students

Application Materials for Prospective Undergraduate International Students

 


 

Frequently asked questions regarding admission to the undergraduate Architecture, Industrial Design, Interior Design, and Landscape Architecture Programs:

Is a portfolio required for admission?

No. Many high schools do not teach art classes. Our Foundation Design Laboratories (ARCH 1015, 1016) provide the design fundamentals needed to be a successful designer. Admissions are primarily based on a student’s grade point average and SAT or ACT score. If you have questions regarding the admission requirements, please contact the Undergraduate Admissions Office at vtadmiss@vt.edu; orhttp://www.admiss.vt.edu/ .

What classes should I take in high school to best prepare me for a major in Architecture, Industrial Design, Interior Design or Landscape Architecture?

Advanced placement courses in Math, Science, English, and Foreign Languages are the best preparatory courses. These classes show dedication to one’s learning and are the best preparation for taking the SAT exam. Art and architecture classes are encouraged, but now required.

What is the foreign language requirement?

Students who do not complete 2 units of a foreign language in high school must earn 6 credits of a college foreign language, these credits are in addition to those normally required for graduation.

If you are a high school student trying to decide on a foreign language, we recommend Spanish. Italian is also a good choice. Many of our study abroad opportunities travel through Italy due to the rich tradition of design excellence in Italy.

I am a student currently enrolled at Virginia Tech and I would like to transfer into the Architecture, Industrial Design, Interior Design or Landscape Architecture program. What is the process for acceptance?

We refer to currently enrolled Virginia Tech undergraduate students who want to change their major and transfer into Architecture, Industrial Design, Interior Design or Landscape Architecture as “internal transfers”. Applications are required and available at the beginning of the spring semester. Applications will be accepted beginning the first day of spring semester, January 17, 2012. The application deadline is February 10, 2012.

Applications for Architecture and Industrial Design may be picked up in 201 Cowgill Hall and applications for Interior Design and Landscape Architecture may be picked up in 121 Burruss Hall. You may access the application online. Please see the applications listed below.

Please review the internal transfer process for further information. (Internal Transfer Process)

Please Note: A meeting will be held during the fall semester 2012, for students in University Studies, who are interested in the internal transfer process.

Architecture Application

Industrial Design Application

Interior Design Application

Landscape Architecture Application

Internal Transfer Policy

If I am accepted as an internal transfer student in Architecture, Industrial Design, Interior Design or Landscape Architecture, what happens next?

Students enrolled at Virginia tech who are accepted through the Internal transfer process are all required to take the Summer Qualifying Design Lab during the following first and second summer session.
ARCH 2984 Summer Qualifying Design Lab (Course Description)

I am enrolled at another University or Community College (not a student at Virginia Tech), and I would like to transfer into the Architecture, Industrial Design, Interior Design, or Landscape Architecture program at Virginia Tech. What do I need to do?

You would be classified as an “external transfer student”. You need to apply for admission through the Virginia Tech Undergraduate Admissions Office. Students admitted through the external transfer process will be required to take the Summer Qualifying Design Lab during the first and second summer sessions prior to entering the fall semester of the academic year in which application has been made. Placement during the fall semester will be determined upon completion of the second summer session.

Online Application for External Transfer Students

I have Advanced Placement, CLEP, International Baacalaureate, and/or credit from another institution. How can I find out if the credit will transfer to Virginia Tech?

You may access the Virginia Tech Undergraduate Transfer Equivalency Database to determine how credit taken through another institution will transfer to Virginia Tech.

You may access the AP, IB & CLEP information through the Registrar’s website to determine how this type of credit will transfer to Virginia Tech.

graduate admissions

Admission to Graduate Programs

All graduate applications to the School of Architecture + Design must be completed through the Virginia Tech Graduate School. (See the Graduate School Applications Web Page)

For information on admission to the Master of Landscape Architecture program, please visit the following links: 3-Year First Professional MLA2-Year Advanced MLA1-Year Plus Thesis MLA.

For information on admission to the Master of ArchitectureMaster of Science in Architecture, and Ph.D. in Architecture and Design Research degree programs, please see below:

Students are admitted to the Graduate Architecture Program on a competitive basis. Applicants are reviewed by an admissions group comprised of faculty members from the School of Architecture + Design and are evaluated on the basis of their previous background, including academic performance and relevant work experience. It is essential that applicants demonstrate qualities necessary for successful study at the graduate level through their previous academic work, and that they have shown responsibility, judgment, motivation, imagination and receptivity to new ideas.

Prospective students are strongly encouraged to use the on-line application to the Virginia Tech Graduate School. It is the responsibility of the applicant to ensure that the completed application and required supporting materials are received by the University Graduate School and the Graduate Architecture Program, including the portfolio (required for M.Arch. 1 & 2 candidates), no later than January 15th for admission for the following fall semester to the M.Arch., MS.Arch., or Ph.D. A+DR programs. (The application deadline for the MLA program is February 15th.) If all materials are not received by the deadline, the application may not be considered for admission.

Every effort will be made to notify applicants by mail of the admission decision by the first week of April. However, some applications will be held for further review pending available space.

Applicants who are accepted and cannot attend the Fall Semester, may request that their admission date be deferred; however, this deferral is not automatic and requires the approval of the Graduate Architecture Program Chair and the Dean of the Graduate School.

Applicants to the M.Arch.1, M.Arch.2, and Ph.D. programs who plan to begin their studies at the Washington-Alexandria Center should so indicate in their application. However, ALL APPLICANTS for graduate study in architecture should send required application materials to the Graduate Architecture Program office in the School of Architecture + Design on the Virginia Tech Main Campus in Blacksburg, VA.

Admission Prerequisites

Admission to the graduate programs at Virginia Tech is normally contingent upon holding an appropriate undergraduate baccalaureate degree from an accredited college or university and presentation of evidence of potential to successfully pursue graduate level work in architecture. Completion of the Bachelor’s degree with a high academic standing is expected.

Beyond the University academic requirements described in the application package, applicants to the graduate program in architecture must have the following preparation:

  • M.Arch.1 – Admission prerequisites: first professional degree (5 year), Bachelor of Architecture, NAAB accredited, or equivalent. (Note: The one-year Master of Architecture from Virginia Tech is a post-professional degree and does not constitute an accredited first professional degree in architecture. International applicants who hold architecture degrees from schools outside the U.S. and who aspire to professional licensure in the U.S. are normally advised to apply to the M.Arch.2 program. Please refer to additional information regarding professional licensure for architects in the U.S.)
  • M.Arch.3 – Admission prerequisites: Bachelor’s Degree, no limitations on a particular discipline. The following non-mandatory coursework is recommended in preparation for graduate study in the M.Arch.3 program: mathematics through college algebra, trigonometry and analytic geometry, one term of general physics, and a survey course in architectural history.
  • MS.Arch. and Ph.D. – While a degree in architecture or a related field is not absolutely required, applicants must demonstrate relevant background and experience, as well as capabilities for undertaking advanced academic study.

Note: Applicants should make certain to note on the application the specific program option (M.Arch. 1, 2, or 3 or specific research concentration for M.S.Arch. or PhD) in which you intend to study. Changes from one program or program option to another are generally not possible without approval of a written request prior to admission.

Procedures

Graduate study in all Master of Architecture programs typically begins in August, during the Fall semester each year. It is normally not possible to begin M.Arch. studies during the Spring semester.

For all graduate programs in architecture, a complete application should be received by Virginia Tech by January 15th for admission for the following fall semester.

In order for an application to be considered, the following items must be submitted:

  • A completed graduate application (on-line strongly recommended), including payment of a nonrefundable application fee.
  • Up-to-date transcripts of undergraduate and graduate records. Transcripts should be uploaded into the on-line application. Please do not mail your official transcripts to us until you have received an offer of admission from Virginia Tech. Please note that non-legible scans will not be accepted. Make sure your scanned documents are legible before uploading, as non-legible documents will result in processing delays. A grade point average of at least 3.0 (4.0 scale) for the last 60 semester credit hours, or equivalent, is required. An applicant whose previous academic performance is deemed slightly deficient (grade point average of 2.75 to 2.99) or whose transcripts are not current may be admitted as a “Provisional” student, as described in the University Graduate Catalog.
  • Three letters of recommendation from teachers, professionals or other people knowledgeable about the applicant’s work. Letters of recommendation that are not submitted on-line should be sent directly to the Graduate Architecture Program office.
  • A Resumé and a Statement of Intent briefly describing the applicant’s background, personal interests, motivation for the study of architecture, and, if applicable, proposed area of research focus. In lieu of the brief Statement of Intent, PhD applicants must submit a 2,500-word statement of research focus.
  • The Graduate School requires official test scores from the TOEFL for all International applicants. The School of Architecture + Design requires official GRE scores for applicants for the M.Arch.3, Comprehensive Professional Studies program, the Master of Science in Architecture program, the Ph.D. program and all international applicants. GRE scores are recommended for all other applicants.

International Students

All international applicants should refer to the Virginia Tech Graduate School website concerning additional admission requirements.

Portfolio

Candidates for admission to the M.Arch. 1 & 2 programs must demonstrate their competence in design beyond the academic transcript. A portfolio of studio work in architectural design and related visual studies is required of these applicants. For candidates for admission to the M.Arch.3 and MS.Arch. programs, submittal of a portfolio is not mandatory due to the variety of academic backgrounds of applicants. However, if an applicant has educational or professional experience in architecture, design, construction, or visual arts (drawing, painting, sculpture, photography, etc.), submittal of a portfolio is recommended. Portfolios should be sent directly to the Graduate Architecture Program office. Portfolios can no longer be returned, therefore please submit a copy and not your only original portfolio.

Portfolios should be NO MORE than 20 (physical) pages, bound preferably in a spiral notebook. Your full name should be printed clearly on the cover page. The size requirement is 8 1/2” × 11” (North American standard) or A4 (International standard). The admissions committee does not have facilities to handle large drawings or original samples of an applicant’s work. Applicants should present a limited set of work, representative of their best efforts and most expressive of their interests and abilities. Applicants are discouraged from submitting digital portfolios; those choosing to submit a digital portfolio do so at their own risk, since, due to possible hardware and software compatibility issues, some members of the admissions committee may not be able to view it.

Interview

Faculty and students at Virginia Tech are available to talk with prospective applicants, provide tours of the architecture facilities, and answer questions about the graduate architecture program, so that applicants may determine whether study at Virginia Tech is appropriate to their educational goals. It is desirable for prospective applicants to visit the campus and talk with an advisor if at all possible; however, since travel is an obvious financial burden to many applicants, an interview is not required for admission to the graduate program, and lack of an interview will not reduce one’s chances of admission. If you wish to schedule an interview or a visit to the campus, please contact the Graduate Architecture Program via e-mail at garch@vt.edu or via telephone at            (540) 231-5683       for an appointment. Applicants are asked to consult the Virginia Tech calendar to avoid requesting an interview during the first and last weeks of each semester.

Computer Requirement

All incoming students in the Master of Architecture program are required to have a personal computer. Recommended specifications are identical to those for undergraduate architecture students. Please see the School of Architecture + Designcomputer requirement web page.

No student will be denied admission to Virginia Tech based on an inability to purchase a computer. Graduate students on financial aid may include their computer purchases in their cost of attendance.

Financial Assistance

Several forms of financial assistance are available to graduate students, including grants by federal agencies, fellowships, and scholarships awarded by corporations, foundations, and professional organizations, as well as low and moderate-interest, federally-insured loans, including subsidized loan programs. Interested students can obtain detailed and updated information directly from the University Office of Scholarships and Financial Aid and The Graduate School. The School of Architecture + Design awards a limited number of graduate assistantships each year. Assistantships are service positions and normally involve providing support to faculty for research or teaching; typical duties include providing tutorial assistance in the various workshops, providing teaching assistance in design studios or for required courses, research project assistance, and photographic assistance in project documentation and presentation. Stipends depend on the student’s academic achievement and experience. Students seeking a Master’s degree are usually not awarded an assistantship position for more than two academic years; assistantships are not normally available to first year students in the M.Arch.3 program.

More information on Financial Aid

Note: Virginia Tech does not discriminate against employees, students, or applicants on the basis of age, color, disability, gender, national origin, political affiliation, race, religion, sexual orientation or veteran status. Anyone having questions concerning discrimination or accessibility should contact the Office of Equity and Access .

Frequently Asked Questions Regarding Admission to the M.Arch., M.S.Arch. and PhD (Arch. and Design Research) Progams:

Q: When is the application deadline?
A: January 15th. This is the deadline for the School of Architecture + Design. For the M.ARCH 1, M.ARCH 2, M.ARCH 3, MS, & PhD (ADR) programs. Do not confuse this date with the date that the Graduate School posts.

Q: What are the prerequisites to apply to your Graduate Program?
A: The basic requirement is an undergraduate degree from an accredited college or university. Specific graduate architecture programs or program options have additional prerequisites (see program descriptions above).

Q: What is the mailing address to which to send portfolio, reference letters and/or transcripts to the Graduate Architecture Program?
A: Graduate Architecture Program, School of Architecture + Design, 201 Cowgill Hall (0205), Virginia Tech, Blacksburg, VA 24061

Q: Do reference letters have to be on the reference form?
A: No, they can be in letter format, they can be emailed, or they can be faxed.

Q: Do you accept applications for the Spring semester?
A: Due to our sequence of course offerings, we usually do not admit students to the M.Arch., MS.Arch., or Ph.D. A+DR programs for the Spring semester. Any exceptions would have to be made by the Chair of the Graduate Architecture Program.

Q: How do I apply for an assistantship?
A: You are considered for an assistantship when your application for admission is reviewed. M.Arch.3 applicants are not normally considered for an assistantship until their second year in the program.

Q: What is the portfolio format requirement?
A: Portfolios should be NO MORE than 20 (physical) pages, bound preferably in a spiral notebook. Your full name should be printed clearly on the cover page. The size requirement is 8 1/2” × 11” (North American standard) or A4 (International standard). Portfolios cannot be returned.

Q: What is the minium GRE score?
A: PhD – 1150 (combined total of verbal and quantitative parts only); M.Arch/M.S. – preferably a score of 1150 or better (combined total of verbal and quantitative parts); however, we do not use the GRE score to eliminate applicants for the Masters programs.

Q: What is the minimum TOEFL score?
A: TOEFL score minimums are directed by the Graduate School: 213 for computer-based test; 550 for paper-based; 79-80 for internet-based.

Q: What is the institutional code for Virginia Tech?
A: 5859

For more answers to frequently asked admissions questions, please see theGraduate School Applications Web Page .

Last Modified: September 27, 2011

 

 

University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee, School of Architecture & Urban Planning

Department of Architecture
P.O. Box 413
Milwaukee, WI 53201
United StatesMain Phone:             414-229-4014
Fax: 414-229-6976
Web site: http://www.uwm.edu/SARUP/
Steven Heidt

M.Arch Application Process

Application Information – Printable version Download Acrobat Reader (PDF:71K)

Application Deadline: January 15 (summer/fall admission)
3.5 yr M.Arch applicants apply for summer term. The Graduate School recommends that you begin the application process one year before the semester you plan to start.

Application to the 2 yr M.Arch Program requires a bachelor’s degree in architectural studies (or equivalent), a cumulative GPA of at least 3.0 (4.0 scale), and completion of at least five undergraduate design studios. The 3.5 yr M.Arch Program requires a bachelor’s degree in any discipline and a cumulative GPA of at least 3.0 (4.0 scale).

Application and Fee: Submit to UWM Graduate School
Complete the UWM Graduate School application form on-line at:http://apply.wisconsin.edu.

Reasons Statement: Submit to UWM Graduate School
Rationale for graduate study and pursuit of a professional degree. This may include strengths you bring to graduate study in architecture at UWM, areas of particular interest, and long-range career goals. Address why you are interested in becoming a professional architect, your expectations of the program, and any details in your personal history or background which are relevant to your interest in professional architecture.

Transcripts: Submit to UWM Graduate School
One official transcript sent directly to the Graduate School from each undergraduate and graduate school attended. If you attended UWM as an undergraduate, the Graduate School will obtain transcripts from the UWM Undergraduate Records Office.

Graduate Record Exam (GRE) – General Test: Submit to UWM Graduate School (Institution Code: R1473)
Allow at least one month for receipt of all scores. Visit the GRE website for more information about registration and preparation: www.gre.org. Although there is no minimum score requirement, preferred scores are in the top 50%-ile for each category.

Letters of Recommendation: Submit to UWM School of Architecture and Urban Planning, Student Advising Office
Three letters of recommendation from people familiar with your academic and/or professional work. Letters should be from non-related individuals who know you through previous academic programs or relevant professional activity. Recommendation forms are available online at: http://www4.uwm.edu/sarup/admissions/applying.cfm

Portfolio: Submit to UWM School of Architecture and Urban Planning, Student Advising Office
Format: 8-1/2” x 11” maximum size. Portfolio should be bound with name clearly visible on spine or outside front cover. The department does not examine oversized portfolios, loose or rolled materials, or digital portfolios. For portfolio return, include a stamped, self-addressed envelope (check with your postal service for cost), or arrange for pick-up.

International Students
A minimum TOEFL score of 100 iBT or 600 PBT is required, or a score of 7.0 on the IELTS examination. Additional requirements for international applicants are available at:http://www4.uwm.edu/cie/futurestudents/69/

Follow-Up
Watch for information from the Graduate School on monitoring your application status online. Application status will reflect receipt of items required by the Graduate School to process your application. To confirm receipt of additional materials required by the M.Arch Program, follow up with the School of Architecture and Urban Planning, Student Advising Office.

Application Contacts

Graduate School
University of Wisconsin – Milwaukee
Graduate School
Academic Programs and Student Services
P.O. Box 340
Milwaukee, WI 53201-0340
Phone:             414.229.6569
Fax: 414.229.6967

Street Address:
3203 N. Downer Avenue, Mitchell Hall
Milwaukee, WI 53211
Email:  www.graduateschool.uwm.edu/contact-us/

School of Architecture and Urban Planning
University of Wisconsin – Milwaukee
School of Architecture & Urban Planning
Student Advising Office
P.O. Box 413
Milwaukee, WI 53201-0413
Phone:             414.229.4015
Fax:  414.229.6976

Street Address:
2131 E. Hartford Avenue, AUP 225
Milwaukee, WI 53211
Email:  jsinger@uwm.edu (Judith Singer, Administrative Assistant)

Center for International Education
University of Wisconsin – Milwaukee
International Admissions
Center for International Education
P.O. Box 413
Milwaukee, WI 53201-0413 USA
Phone:             414.229.4846
Fax:  414.229.0521

Street Address:
2441 E. Hartford Avenue, Garland 138
Milwaukee, WI 53211
Email:  isss@uwm.edu

 

 

University of Waterloo, School of Architecture

7 Melville Street South
Cambridge, ON N2L 3G1
CanadaMain Phone:             519-888-4567
Fax: 519-622-3525
E-mail: info@architecture.uwaterloo.ca
Web site: http://www.architecture.uwaterloo.ca/
Rick Haldenby, Director

admissions process

home/prospective students/undergraduate admissions/admissions process

The School of Architecture carries out an initial screening of applicants on the basis of overall academic background and, more specifically, grades received in the required courses. The School receives fifteen to twenty applications for each space available, hence students will normally need an overall average of at least 80% and at least a grade in the high 70s (usually 80%) in English and at least 70% in Physics and the two required mathematics courses, to be considered for an interview. We recommend that students take art, history and other humanities courses and pursue independent creative activities. As at the time of application to the school, it is unlikely that students will have final grades in their Grade 12 courses, the review of grades will begin by using the Grade 11 average and grades. As Grade 12 final and interim grades become available these will also be reviewed. Selection of the students that will be invited for an interview in April will be determined by whatever combination of appropriate Grade 11 and 12 grades are available by the middle of March. If conditionally accepted into the program, students are expected to maintain their average. Failure to complete required courses, or final grades below 70% will result in a revocation of any offer of admission.

Approximately 500 students will be selected for further consideration for admission. These students are required to participate in an interview as part of the admissions process. A portfolio of creative work must also be presented during the interview. In addition, a test in the form of an English précis will be required of applicants on the day of their scheduled interview. An Admission Information Form is also required. Admission to the School depends on both success in the précis test and the results of the interview.

There are no specific requirements or format for portfolios. Do not over-select, bring a wide range of material that represents the full scope and quality of your creative activity. This usually means original samples of artwork such as drawings, paintings, graphics, video, three-dimensional works, and multimedia projects that you have completed. In addition, you may wish to include other creative studies, for example, photography, craftwork such as ceramics, clothing, jewelry, metal work, dance, or music, either performed live or on tape. The committee is also interested in seeing your sketchbooks and evidence of your thought and creative processes. It is preferable to bring the original versions of your pieces, rather than photographic or otherwise reduced reproductions. Portfolios consisting only of drafting or technical drawings are not appropriate. The highest value is attached to self initiated projects and high levels of critical engagement with the creative process.

While the majority of the time in the interview will be devoted to a discussion of your work, you should also be prepared to answer questions about your creative work, interests, travel, engagement in extracurricular activities, reading preferences and other pursuits. The interview panel will normally consist of two faculty members and two senior students from the School of Architecture. The interview is approximately 25 minutes in length.

For students entering from high school, offers of admission, remain conditional on obtaining a final mark of at least 75% in ENG4U and 70% in each of the other required courses.

Students who reside more than 500 km from the School may complete analternative interview format, but it is preferable to attend a face-to-face interview if at all possible.

Master of Architecture (MArch)
Printable Version printable version
Program Description

The University of Waterloo offers a master’s program leading to the degree Master of Architecture (MArch). This program is designed to prepare students for professional qualification as architects.The Master’s program in Architecture combines elements of a professional master’s program and a research-oriented master’s program. It offers preparation for entry into the profession of architecture (together with an extension of the knowledge base required of practicing professionals, now and in years to come) to students with an undergraduate degree in pre-professional architecture, such as a Bachelor of Architectural Studies. The program is designed to develop the skills and intellectual curiosity required for a leadership role in the profession and in society, and for entry into doctoral studies. The Master’s Thesis, the core academic component of the program, will develop research and analytical/interpretive skills, as well as design skills – i.e., the synthetic skills of architecture.

Financial Assistance

Some teaching and research assistantships are available to graduate students in the Master of Architecture program.Some University of Waterloo Graduate Scholarships are also available to qualified students. These scholarships are assigned by the School.

Students may also apply for University of Waterloo Graduate Bursaries, if they can demonstrate financial need.

Admission Requirements

The Master’s program in Architecture is a twelve-month, three-term program that may begin in the Fall, Winter or Spring term. Currently, admission requirements are as follows:

  • A four-year honours undergraduate degree in pre-professional Architecture or professional Bachelor of Architecture degree with a minimum overall average of 75% (B).
  • Two letters of reference, from academic sources (referee is contacted by email and the referral is submitted electronically)
  • One official academic transcript from each post-secondary institution
  • A CV/resume
  • A one-page statement of research interest
  • Proof of English Language Proficiency (if applicable): A score of at least 600 is required in the Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL). (See English Language Proficiency for other acceptable tests of English.)
  • Where applicable, a portfolio
All of the above documentation is uploaded onto the “My Materials” tab in Quest. Only the portfolio is sent directly to the Graduate Studies Coordinator at the School of Architecture. Official transcripts should be directed to the Graduate Studies Office. For detailed information, please refer to the following link: http://www.grad.uwaterloo.ca/students/applyingonline.asp
Required Supplementary Application Information

Supplementary information for the School of Architecture may be required with your University of Waterloo Graduate Studies Application, and will be recommended during the application process.

 

Degree Requirements

The curriculum involves course work, a graduate Studio/Seminar and a Graduate Thesis in Design in an area of architecture. The three-term curriculum is normally completed in twelve months, and is the final stage in the period of academic preparation for the student’s professional qualification as an architect.There are four parts to the curriculum:

  • at least three specialist electives, each a one-term course (.50 unit weight per course), taken in at least two of the three academic streams (Cultural Studies, Environment, Technology) other than design
  • three compulsory (ARCH 652 & ARCH 654, 0.25 unit weight, and ARCH 655, 0.50 unit weight) courses in the aspects of professional practice and architectural responsibility
  • Graduate Studio and Seminar in Design (equivalent to three term courses/1.50 units of credit) (ARCH 692)
  • a Master’s Thesis in Design (equivalent to four one-term courses/2.00 units of credit)

portfolios

home/prospective students/undergraduate admissions/portfolios

If you are invited for an interview, you will have the opportunity to present to the admissions committee a portfolio of your creative artistic work. We do not have specific requirements for portfolios and you can include anything you feel best represents your creativity. You should include original samples of your artwork such as drawings, samples which demonstrate your ability to understand and use colour, and samples of 2- and 3-dimensional works that you have completed. In addition, you may wish to include other creative studies, for example, photography, craftwork such as ceramics or jewellery, metal work, dance, or music, either performed live or on tape. If you are bringing multimedia work, and cannot bring a suitable playing device, please contact the Undergraduate student co-ordinator Donna Woolcott prior to your interview day so that we can be sure to have equipment available. The committee is also interested in seeing your sketchbooks and evidence of your thought and creative process. It is preferable to bring in the original versions of your pieces rather than photographic or otherwise reduced reproductions. Portfolios consisting strictly of drafting or other technical drawings are rarely what the admissions committee seeks.

The work you choose for your portfolio should be recent. Powers of observation, design sensitivity, drawing skills, and craftsmanship constantly improve and will probably be more refined in recent work. Bear in mind that the interview is 25 minutes in length and a significant portion of the interview will be spent with you in discussion over your work. Be prepared to speak to and answer questions about your creative work, interests, reading preferences, the source and exploration of your interest in architecture, and other pursuits. The interview is usually conducted by 2 faculty members and one or two senior students from the School of Architecture.

Students are strongly discouraged from using the services of “portfolio schools” as the work generated by these facilities may not be beneficial to the admission interview and may be perceived to be not of your own authorship. An important aspect of the interview process is the determination of authorship of your portfolio pieces. You should be able to demonstrate through discussion with the committee your personal knowledge and involvement in all pieces presented. Submission of work that is not your own will result in the dismissal of your application.

 

 

University of Washington, Department of Architecture

208 Gould Hall
Box 355720
Seattle, WA 98195-5720
United StatesMain Phone:             206-543-4180
Fax: 206-616-4992
E-mail: archdept@uw.edu
Web site: http://arch.be.washington.edu/
David E. Miller, Chair and Professor

MASTER OF ARCHITECTURE

Candidates for admission to the Master of Architecture program must apply to both the M.Arch. program and the Graduate School of the University of Washington.

Admission to the M.Arch. Program is a highly competitive process. The Department of Architecture’s M.Arch. Admissions Committee gives priority to applicants whose apparent abilities will enable them to complete the program expeditiously and with a high level of achievement. In evaluating applicants, the committee considers the following materials:

ONLINE

The first step in the application process is to apply online to the Office of Graduate Admissions. This application will request the following documents:

  • On-line Application for Admission to the Graduate School: submit together with the $75 application fee.
  • Three letters of recommendation (applicants will be prompted to list three recommenders on the online Graduate School Application).
  • GRE test scores. Report Scores to the UW Institution Code: 4854; Department Code 4401.
  • TOEFL test scores (for international students). Minimum test scores for admission to the Master of Architecture: 580 TOEFL, 237 TOEFLC, or 92 TOEFLiBT.

 

Application Status
Please submit your Graduate School Application online before forwarding supplemental materials. Your application status can be checked on-line after you have submitted.

HARDCOPY

In addition to the on-line application, the process requires that the following items are sent directly to the Department of Architecture (note: all other documents are submitted as part of the on-line process):

  • A hardcopy of the completed on-line Application for Admission to the Graduate School.
  • The Master of Architecture application form. This form must clearly indicate the degree program for which the applicant wishes to be considered.
  • M Arch 3+ and 2+ Year applicants: A one-page statement of purpose should clearly articulate the candidate’s goals and the extent to which the M.Arch. program can be expected to prepare him or her for them. Although this statement should be primarily forward-looking, some information about the candidate’s background may be helpful.
  • M Arch 1+ Year applicants: A statement of purpose which must include a specific and clearly-articulated plan of study. Applications that do not include a clear plan of study cannot be evaluated seriously. This statement should also include a list of faculty in the department who are best qualified to work with the candidate on the program of study. The Graduate Program Coordinator will ask the faculty on this list, and others who can comment on the proposal, to evaluate the application. In order to be admitted to the program, it is essential for candidates to gain the support of faculty who share academic interests with them.
  • Unofficial transcripts from all institutions of higher education attended.
  • Copy of official GRE test scores
  • Copy of official TOEFL test scores (international students)
  • A portfolio of work in graphics and design (or similar work appropriate to the program). The portfolio should be no more than 20 pages in a format no larger than 1.5 x 10.5 x 11.5 inches. It must show evidence of the applicant’s preparation for study in architecture. For the two-year program this should include models and freehand, technical, and digital drawings of architectural projects. If possible it should also include other examples of design and artistic work, such as furniture, painting, and/or photography. (Advice on preparing the portfolio)

The application form and all supporting materials must be received at the following address on or before January 15:

University of Washington
Graduate Admissions Committee
Department of Architecture
Box 355720
208 Gould Hall
Seattle, WA 98195-5720

Decisions will be mailed to applicants no later than April 15.

Applicant files will be retained for one year. Reapplication for the following year requires the submission of a new application to the Graduate School, along with the application fee. When reapplying, candidates should also consider updating the portfolio as well as transcripts or other application materials to reflect current activity or coursework.

REAPPLICATION PROCEDURE

Application materials are retained for one year.  If you wish to reapply to the program, our department can reactivate the following items: transcripts, letters of recommendation and statement of purpose. The UW Graduate Admissions Application and the Department Application must be resubmitted new for each admissions cycle.

Reapplicants must also submit in writing to the department (by December 15) which items from your prior application to reactivate and which you will be replacing/updating.   Students who were not previously accepted and wish to reapply are strongly encouraged to submit new application materials to strengthen their chance of admission. 

Please contact the Graduate Program Adviser to confirm reapplication prior to January 15.

 

 

University of Virginia, School of Architecture

Campbell Hall
PO Box 400122
Charlottesville, VA 22904-4122
United StatesMain Phone:             434-924-1493
Fax: 434-982-2678
Web site: http://www.arch.virginia.edu/
Iñaki Alday

MASTER OF ARCHITECTURE, PROFESSIONAL DEGREE

This professional, accredited Architecture program (Paths A and B) offers within its design curriculum a forum for synthesizing parallel studies in history, theory, technology, and representation. In the design of buildings, landscapes and urban infrastructure, the curriculum supports a stimulating and sustainable setting for diverse cultural expression. Our mission is to develop the next generation of civic and professional leaders through:

M.ARCH. PATH A

This program allows students without pre-professional undergraduate degrees (e.g., B.S. in Architecture) to obtain a first professional degree in a minimum of three years plus an initial summer session. Applicants must hold a baccalaureate degree from an accredited college or university.

After the first year, each student’s studio work is evaluated to determine progress and ability to continue in the program. In the spring of their second year, students initiate a comprehensive design project that explores detailed design development of a small institutional or commercial building. Issues of programming, building structure, materials and assembly, detailing and life safety are explored in conjunction with ARCH 848 and ARCH 823.

Path A COURSE REQUIREMENTS

SUMMER DESIGN INSTITUTE

  • ALAR 5010 Introduction to Design (1)
  • ALAR 5020 Introduction to Graphics (1)
  • ALAR 5030 Introduction to Theory & Analysis (1)
  • Total Credits: 3

6000 YEAR

FALL SEMESTER

  • ALAR 6710 Studio Workshop (2)
  • ARCH 6010 Foundation Studio I (6)
  • ARCH 6120 Architectural Theory & Analysis (3)
  • ARCH 6231 Building Integration Workshop 1 (4)
  • SARC 6000 The Common Course (1)
  • Total Credits: 16

SPRING SEMESTER

  • ALAR 6712 Studio Workshop (2)
  • ARCH 6020 Foundation Studio II (6)
  • ARCH 6140 Key Buildings (3)
  • ARCH 6240 Introduction to Structural Design (4)
  • ARCH 6261 Building Integration Workshop 2 (4)
  • Total Credits: 19

7000 YEAR

FALL SEMESTER

  • ARCH 7010 Foundation Studio III (6)
  • ARCH 7210 Structural Design – Dynamic Loads (3)
  • Elective1 (3)
  • Elective1 (3)
  • Total Credits: 15

 SPRING SEMESTER

  • ALAR 7020 Design Research Studio (6)
  • ARCH 7230 Design Development (4)
  • ARCH 7250 Environmental Systems & Lighting (4)
  • Elective1 (3)
  • Total Credits: 17

8000 YEAR

FALL SEMESTER

  • ARCH 8010 Comprehensive Studio3 (6)
  • ARCH 8230 Building Synthesis3 (3)
  • Elective1,2  (3)
  • Elective1 (3)
  • Total Credits: 15

SPRING SEMESTER

  • ALAR 8020 Design Research Studio II (6) OR
  • ALAR 8995 Advanced Design Research Studio (3)
  • ARCH 8480 Professional Ethics & Communication (3)
  • Elective1 (3)
  • Elective1 (3)
  • Total Credits: 15

Degree Total: 100

Notes:
1.Elective Courses must include two in Architectural History [AR H Designation], one in Architectural Theory, one in Architectural Technology, and three Open Electives. See List of Electives attached each semester to Advising Notes.
2.Students planning to pursue Independent Design Research in lieu of ALAR 8020 must take ALAR 8100 Design Research Seminar. Apply for entrance into ALAR 8100 Design Research Seminar in the spring of the 700–year. Taking the seminar does not obligate you to take ALAR 8995 Independent Design Research Studio nor does it confirm that you will be accepted into that studio.
3.ARCH 6231 is required for first year Path A architecture students and open to all other grad students in the school as 6232.

M.ARCH. PATH B

Students admitted to this program have pursued a rigorous pre-professional program at the undergraduate level. The curriculum follows the prescribed core of foundation studies — history, land, and building. Students are encouraged to develop a planned sequence of electives either independently or through one of the certificate programs. Independent scholarship is encouraged through the thesis option. In the spring of their first year, students initiate a comprehensive design project that explores detailed design development of a small institutional or commercial building. Issues of programming, building structure, materials and assembly, detailing and life safety are explored in conjunction with ARCH 848 and ARCH 823.

Path B COURSE REQUIREMENTS

7000 YEAR

FALL SEMESTER

  • ARCH 7010 Foundation Studio III (6)
  • ARCH 7210 Structural Design – Dynamic Loads (4)
  • SARC 6000 The Common Course (1)
  • Elective1 (3)
  • Elective1 (3)
  • Total Credits: 17

SPRING SEMESTER

  • ALAR 7020 Design Research Studio (6)
  • ARCH 7230 Design Development (4)
  • ARCH 7250 Environmental Systems & Lighting (4)
  • ARCH 6140 Architectural Analysis: Key Buildings (3)
  • Total Credits: 17

8000 YEAR

FALL SEMESTER

  • ARCH 8010 Comprehensive Studio (6)
  • ARCH 8230 Building Synthesis (3)
  • Elective1,2 (3)
  • Elective1 (3)
  • Total Credits: 15

SPRING SEMESTER

  • ALAR 8020 Design Research Studio (6) OR
  • ALAR 8995 Advanced Design Research Studio (6)
  • ARCH 8480 Professional Ethics & Communication (3)
  • Elective1 (3)
  • Elective(3)
  • Total Credits: 15

Degree Total: 64

Notes:
1. Elective Courses must include two in Architectural History [AR H Designation], one in Architectural Theory, one in Architectural Technology, and two Open Electives. See List of Electives attached each semester to Advising Notes.

2. Students planning to pursue Independent Design Research in lieu of ALAR 8020 must take ALAR 8100 Design Research Seminar. Apply for entrance into ALAR 8100 Design Research Seminar in the spring of the 700–year. Taking the seminar does not obligate you to take ALAR 8995 Independent Design Research Studio nor does it confirm that you will be accepted into that studio.
3. ARCH 6231 is required for first year Path A architecture students and open to all other grad students in the school as 6232.

ACCREDITATION

In the United States, most state registration boards require a degree from an accredited professional degree program as a prerequisite for licensure. The National Architectural Accrediting Board (NAAB), which is the sole agency authorized to accredit US professional degree programs in architecture, recognizes two types of degrees: the Bachelor of Architecture and the Master of Architecture. A program may be granted a five-year, three-year, or two-year term of accreditation, depending on its degree of conformance with established educational standards.

Masters degree programs may consist of a pre-professional undergraduate degree and a professional graduate degree, which, when earned sequentially, comprise an accredited professional education. Please note that the pre-professional undergraduate degree is not, by itself, recognized as an accredited degree.

The University of Virginia’s Path A (for students without pre-professional degrees) and Path B (for students with rigorous pre-professional degrees) Master of Architecture programs received six-year terms of accreditation in 2003. These programs will be reviewed again in 2009. The Bachelor of Science in Architecture, by itself, is not an accredited degree.

ADMISSION

The Master of Architecture Program attracts a diverse range of students with undergraduate degrees in liberal arts as well as architecture. After an introductory summer session, students with liberal arts degrees typically complete their courses in six semesters, while those with pre-professional degrees frequently gain advanced standing. Students who wish to obtain the Master of Architecture degree should have at least a 3.0 cumulative grade point average with a 3.5 average in design studios. Admission to the Master of Architecture programs is extremely competitive.

A two-semester Master of Architecture Post-Professional Degree Program, directly tailored to the interests of each student, is available for those with an undergraduate professional degree in architecture.

The director of the Graduate Architecture Program is John Quale.

REQUIREMENTS PRIOR TO ENROLLING

Students enrolling in the program must have completed Calculus I and Physics I before beginning the program. It is recommended that students complete the classes prior to applying, however it is not required. Any 3-4 credit physics course will fulfill the requirement, but it would be beneficial to the student if the course covered the areas of statics and mechanics.

INTERDISCIPLINARY PROGRAMS

Certificate Programs in Historic Preservation and American Urbanism are open to graduate students enrolled in Paths A, B, and C. Admission is subject to the approval of the chair of the Department of Architecture and Landscape Architecture and the director of the program. Students must also meet all requirements for admission to, and completion of, the Master of Architecture Program. Students are expected to meet the program requirements within the normal curricula of each path with the exception of Path C, which takes an extra semester. Please see Historic Preservation and American Urbanism for more information.

DUAL DEGREE PROGRAMS 

STUDY ABROAD

Architecture students may, with approval, spend a semester in one of the programs abroad when offered.

 

 

 

University of Texas At San Antonio, College of Architecture

Office of the Dean, MNT 3.360
501 W. Cesar E. Chavez Blvd.
San Antonio, TX 78207
United StatesMain Phone:             210-458-3010
Fax: 210-458-3016
E-mail: gayle.nicoll@utsa.edu
Web site: http://www.utsa.edu/architecture/
Dr. Vincent B. Canizaro, Chair, Department of Architecture

undergraduate admissions

The School of Architecture is one of the smallest academic units at The University of Texas at Austin. Our undergraduate student body exemplifies the diverse constitution of the communities we strive to serve. In support of unique perspectives and experiences, all applications are reviewed with an understanding that excellence may manifest itself in many areas and may be expressed in different forms, such as compelling essays, strong academic preparation, extracurricular activities, excellent test scores, life experiences as well as other accomplishments.

More information about the application process and associated educational costs is available from the Office of Admissions.

Freshman Admission

Applications for freshman admission are available online at www.applytexas.org. The School of Architecture is unable to accommodate all qualified applicants and preference is given to candidates considered to have best demonstrated the interest, aptitude, and dedication to pursue a design education. All applications are evaluated with emphasis on the following areas: SAT or ACT scores, class rank, essays, academic preparation, extracurricular activities, and other achievements. Portfolios are not accepted from freshman applicants.

For more information on freshman admission, please read the Prospective Freshman FAQ.

External Transfer Admission

Applications for external transfer admission are available online atwww.applytexas.org. Transfer applicants from architecture and interior design programs in other universities will be evaluated with emphasis given to excellence in design (portfolio required), academic preparation, essays, and other achievements. Course credit and placement in studio sequence is determined upon acceptance. External transfer admission is offered to a few qualified applicants each year.

For more information on external transfer admission, please read the External Transfer Student FAQ.

Internal Transfer Admission

To request a major change, enrolled University of Texas at Austin students applying for internal transfer must have a minimum of 24 in-resident UT Austin credit hours (completed by the end of a spring semester) and a minimum UT grade point average of 3.25. Emphasis is given to strong performance in university courses, especially courses relevant to the degree program to which the applicant is applying. Meeting these requirements is no guarantee for admission.

For more information on internal transfer admission, please read the Internal Transfer Student FAQ.

International Students

International undergraduate applicants should contact the Graduate and International Admissions Center (GIAC) for application information.

THE ARCHITECTURE AND INTERIOR DESIGN MAJOR CODE

Please be sure to use the correct major code on applications. Students wishing to pursue an undergraduate architecture or interior design degree program must be formally admitted to the School of Architecture with one of the following major codes:

  • Bachelor of Science in Interior Design, 908000
  • Bachelor of Science in Architectural Studies, 908400
  • Bachelor of Architecture, 909200
  • Bachelor of Architecture/Bachelor of Science in Architectural Engineering, 909201
  • Bachelor of Architecture/Bachelor of Arts in Plan II, 909300

Students who intend to pursue the dual degree in Architecture and Plan II Honors must apply to both programs. Please contact the Plan II Honors Program Office in the College of Liberal Arts for further information regarding the separate and early application to the Plan II Honors Program:             512-471-1442      .

CREDIT BY EXAMINATION

Although credit by examination is not offered for architecture courses, it is possible to receive credit by examination for other courses required for architecture and interior design degrees, such as english literature, calculus, physics, american history, government, and certain electives. Detailed information about the UT-Austin testing program is available from the Center for Teaching and Learning.

The SAT Math Level I or II exam is no longer used to establish appropriate mathematics placement. Students who have not earned credit for calculus through AP or dual credit will be required to take the ALEKS assessment exam. In addition, please note that M 305G – Pre-Calculus is no longer the prerequisite for M 408C – Differential and Integral Calculus or M 408K – Differential Calculus. More information on the ALEKS test is available atcns.utexas.edu/academics/placement/math-assessment.

TEXAS SUCCESS INITIATIVE (FORMERLY TASP)

The TSI examination is a state-mandated program designed to improve student success in college. Please contact the TSI office at the University for more information about exemption or waivers at             512-471-8277      .

ALTERNATIVES

Applicants who miss the deadline or whose academic record makes them ineligible for admission to the School of Architecture have at least three alternatives for pursuing an architecture degree:

  • Enroll at UT-Austin in another college or school, complete the courses open to non-majors that will count toward the architecture or interior design degrees, and later apply for internal transfer admission to the School of Architecture. All freshman and transfer applicants are encouraged to indicate a second degree program choice on their UT-Austin application for admission. Students not admitted into the School of Architecture will be considered by the Office of Admissions for the second choice of major (for example, School of Undergraduate Studies, College of Liberal Arts). Students admitted to their second major choice will then be eligible to apply for internal transfer admission to the School of Architecture during the spring for the following fall semester (see Internal Transfer Admission).
  • Apply to another school of architecture or interior design. Accredited degrees in architecture are offered at more than 90 universities in the United States including six other schools in Texas: Rice University, the University of Houston, Texas Tech University, Texas A&M University, Prairie View A&M, The University of Texas at San Antonio and The University of Texas at Arlington. Accredited degrees in Interior Design programs in Texas are The University of Texas at Arlington, University of North Texas, Texas State University, Stephen F. Austin State University, Texas Christian University, and Texas Tech University.
  • Complete your current undergraduate degree program and apply to a first professional graduate architecture or interior design degree program. The University of Texas at Austin, for example, offers a first-professional Master of Architecture degree for students with degrees in unrelated disciplines—a program of approximately three and one-half years in duration.
  • Graduate Admissions

    The University of Texas School of Architecture (UTSOA) graduate programs accept applications ONLY for the Fall semester. Spring applications will not be accepted.

    The application deadline for Fall 2012 admissions is December 15, 2011, for all graduate programs except Interior Design.

    The Interior Design application deadline is January 6, 2012.

    Portfolios must be received by January 6, 2012, for programs that require them (Architecture, Landscape Architecture, Interior Design, Urban Design, (optional) Historic Preservation).

    University of Texas Application Requirements

    All UTSOA graduate applicants must follow the instructions on The Graduate and International Admissions Center (GIAC) Applying for Graduate Admissions page to submit the application, test scores, transcripts, and application fee. 

    • The Fall 2012 on-line application is available on ApplyTexas.org.
    • GRE Scores (UT Austin Institution Code: 6882)
    More information on Test Scores.

    • International students submit TOEFL or IELTS scores
    TOEFL Institution Code:  6882
    IELTS:  There is no code.
    More information on Test Scores.

    • Transcripts
    Carefully follow GIAC’s instructions to submit your transcripts. Upload transcripts on GIAC’s MyStatus check after you submit your ApplyTexas application.

    • Application fee

    About ApplyTexas.org

    Create a profile and password for ApplyTexas.org.

    After you complete and submit your ApplyTexas application:
    (1)  Your references will each receive an e-mail with instructions how to submit your online Letter of Recommendation.

    (2)  You will receive confirmation of your application (within 24-48 hours) and a University Electronic Identification (UT EID) and password. This UT EID and password is for your application and other online University services.
    (If you have a previous application or employment at The University of Texas at Austin, you should already have a UT EID and password.)

    (3)  Log in to GIAC’s MyStatus application status check web site to:
    –   check your application status
    –   monitor which materials have been received and which are needed
    –   upload your other documents, résumé, writing samples, transcripts, and manage your Letters of Recommendation

    UTSOA Graduate Programs Application Requirements 

    UTSOA graduate applicants must also submit departmental requirements.

    Please review the specific items required for each program: Additional Program-Specific Materials.

    Submit required documents online through the ApplyTexas application or GIAC’s MyStatus as directed.

    Please do not mail any documents to UTSOA unless your program requires a portfolio. Mailing paper copies of any documents to UTSOA will significantly delay the processing of your application. Extraneous documents will not be reviewed.

    Departmental requirements include:

     

    • Statement of purpose
    A 1,000-1,500 word essay that addresses your interest in your intended degree program with respect to your academic and professional objectives, a situation or job that helped you define your interest, the factors that led you to apply to the UTSOA, and any other factors related to your academic or professional experience that you wish to convey to the admissions committee.
    (Submit through the ApplyTexas.org online application.)

    • Three letters of recommendation 
    References may include former instructors and professional employers. Letters should include comments on the applicant’s intellectual, communicative, and leadership abilities as well as his or her capacity for creativity and relevant personal characteristics.
    (Submit recommenders’ emails through the ApplyTexas.org online application and manage online through GIAC’s MyStatus check. Paper letters of recommendation will significantly delay the processing of your application.)

    • Résumé or Curriculum Vitae. Required by all UTSOA degree programs.
    (Submit through GIAC’s MyStatus check.)

    • Portfolio 
    ONLY send portfolios of creative work to UTSOA if your program requires it. Refer to the Graduate Portfolio Guidelines. Submit portfolios of creative work directly to the Graduate Programs Office by postal service or courier delivery:

              Graduate Admissions Coordinator
    School of Architecture, GOL 2.308
    The University of Texas at Austin
    1 University Station, B7500
    Austin, Texas 78712-0222

    • Writing Sample

    Submit if required by your degree program as listed on the Additional Program-Specific Materials page.

    This document should demonstrate your analytical writing and reasoning skills. It does not need to be lengthy (most submissions range 5-10 pages), but it should clearly focus on a single topic.

    NOTE: PhD applicants are expected to submit more substantial writing samples, such as theses or dissertations, which demonstrate research abilities and scholarship.

    (Submit through GIAC’s MyStatus check.)

     

     

    INTERNATIONAL STUDENTS

     

    Non-U.S. citizens, including those who have attended another institution in the United States, must follow the instructions for International Graduate Admissionsfrom GIAC. International students must use the Texas Common Application.

     

    THE ADMISSIONS AND REVIEW PROCESS

    You may check your application status on the MyStatus web site.

    Applicants to all graduate degree programs are evaluated on The University of Texas requirements for Graduate Admissions. Some programs may have stricter requirements.

    The graduate admissions committee will not review incomplete application files. An applicant may not be recommended for admission until an application is complete, including all GIAC materials and departmental requirements.

     

    architecture admissions

    B.ARCH., BACHELOR OF ARCHITECTURE

    The School of Architecture can offer limited admission to the architecture degree programs. Students may apply for fall semester admission only. Information on undergraduate admissions is available from SOA undergraduate admissions page.

    M.ARCH. I, FIRST PROFESSIONAL MASTER OF ARCHITECTURE

    Prerequisites for admission include a baccalaureate degree in any field of study — prior training in architecture or design is not required. One semester of Calculus and one semester of Physics for Non-Technical Majors are required for admission. In addition to the application materials, applicants must submit a portfolio and a statement of intent describing the student’s objectives for graduate study. The purpose of the portfolio is not to judge the applicant’s ability to design buildings, but to understand how the applicant communicates visually.

    To apply for the First Professional or Post Professional M.Arch. program at UTSOA, prospective students should follow the SOA graduate admissions instructions.

    M.ARCH. II, POST PROFESSIONAL MASTER OF ARCHITECTURE

    Prerequisites for admission include a professional 5-year baccalaureate degree in architecture from an NAAB accredited school or its international equivalent. Applicants must submit a portfolio, a statement of intent describing the student’s objectives for graduate study.

    To apply for the First Professional or Post Professional M.Arch. program at UTSOA, prospective students should follow the SOA graduate admissions instructions.

Portfolio, Portfolio for Architecture school, Architecture school portfolio, portfolio for architects, architectural portfolio, Design Portfolio, Architecture School Portfolio Development, Architecture School Design portfolio, M.Arch. Application portfolio, M.Arch. admissions, M.Arch. Portfolio Design, M.Arch. application, M.Arch. School of Architecture, M.Arch. Architecture School, M.Arch. portfolio for architecture school

Case Study – M.Arch.I candidate, w/ B.A. in Arch. Studies – Admitted to MIT SoAP

 

for questions or to schedule a FREE intro session, please contact:

phone: 347.236.4407 or
email: elosdesign@gmail.com

 

University of Pennsylvania, Department of Architecture

207 Meyerson Hall
210 South 34th Street
Philadelphia, PA 19104-6311
United StatesMain Phone:             215-898-5728
Fax: 215-573-2192
E-mail: ARCH@design.upenn.edu
Web site: http://www.design.upenn.edu/architecture
Marilyn Jordan Taylor, Dean, PennDesign

HOW TO APPLY

Detailed application instructions and required material

We encourage you to submit your PennDesign application as early as possible, then follow up later with supporting materials. Among the features of our online application is the ability to access your application to update or change your information any number of times until the time you submit the application to us. Please read through all the information below carefully before beginning your application. To create your on-line application account, or to access your current application, click here.

All applicants to degree programs must submit the following:

  • – On-line application form
  • – Application fee ($80)
  • – One official transcript (sealed and stamped) from each college or university attended for credit
  • – Unofficial, scanned transcript from each college or university attended for credit submitted on-line
  • – Three letters of recommendation submitted on-line
  • – Personal statement submitted on-line
  • – Résumé submitted on-line
  • – Graduate Record Examination scores (GRE) submitted by ETS, required of all but MFA applicants
  • – International English Language Testing System (IELTS Academic) or Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL), required of all applicants for whom English is a second language
  • – Portfolio (applicants to Architecture, Landscape Architecture, Fine Arts and Urban Design programs)
  • – Writing Sample (applicants to M.S. in Architecture, M.Arch. II, MEBD and Ph.D. programs)

To download an application checklist, click here.
For information about applying for financial aid, click here.
To download an application guide for the MFA Program, click here.

APPLICATION DEADLINES
Applications and on-line supporting material, including letters of recommendation, must be submitted by 11:59 PM EST on the deadline date listed below. Material that you will be mailing to us, such as paper portfolios and official transcripts, must be received by us, NOT postmarked by the application deadline.

December 14 is the deadline for online submission of the application and receipt of all supporting material for

  • – M.S. in Architecture
  • – Ph.D. in Architecture
  • – Ph.D. in City and Regional Planning

January 4 is the deadline for receipt of the application and all supporting materials (including digital portfolios) for

  • – Master of Architecture I (professional)
  • – Master of Architecture II/PPD (post-professional)

January 17 is the deadline for online submission of the application and receipt of all supporting material for all other programs, including

  • – Master of Environmental Building Design (MEBD)
  • – Master of City and Regional Planning
  • – Master of Fine Arts
  • – Master of Science in Historic Preservation
  • – Master of Landscape Architecture
  • – Master of Urban Spatial Analytics

APPLICATION FEE
The online application allows you to submit your non-refundable application fee of $80 by check or credit card. Once you have submitted your application, you will be asked for your payment method. If you choose to pay by credit card, the system will prompt you to enter your credit card information. All checks should be paid to the order of University of Pennsylvania Board of Trusteesand sent to PennDesign Admissions, 110 Meyerson Hall, 210 S. 34th Street, Philadelphia, PA 19104-6311.

LETTERS OF RECOMMENDATION
You must submit three (3) on-line letters of recommendation. It is recommended that at least two (2) letters of recommendation be from academic instructors. Applicants who have been out of school for several years may submit letters of recommendation from employers or others in a position to evaluate their professional abilities and academic potential. You will need your evaluators’ e-mail addresses when you fill out the recommendation section of the application. As soon as you enter and save your recommenders’ contact information, even before you’ve submitted the application, they will receive an e-mail soliciting their evaluations.

OFFICIAL TRANSCRIPTS
You must send us an official transcript from the Registrar of each college or university you have attended for credit. The transcript must be submitted in a sealed envelope with the Registrar’s stamp across the back flap of the envelope. If we receive a transcript that is not in its sealed envelope, the transcript will considered invalid. Institutions that will not release official individual transcripts to students may send the transcripts directly to PennDesign Office of Admissions, 110 Meyerson Hall, 210 S. 34th Street, Philadelphia, PA 19104-6311. In addition to submitting the paper transcript by mail, we require that transcripts be submitted electronically through the online application. Applicants should scan a copy of each transcript into one document (jpeg or pdf) and then upload the file into the online application.  Students are required to hold an undergraduate degree prior to entering the School of Design, and must submit official transcripts showing that they have received this degree before matriculation.

PERSONAL STATEMENT AND RÉSUMÉ 
Both your personal statement and your résumé should be uploaded via the on-line application. Your résumé should include employment, activities, community service, education, and academic or professional honors. Your personal statement should be no more than 500 words long and should describe your background, your interest in the field to which you are applying, and your academic and career objectives. You should be as specific as you can about the area in which you plan to study.
MFA Applicants: Your résumé should exhibitions or performances, reviews, publications, and personal website if applicable. Your personal statement should be no more than 500 words long and should describe your background, ideas, as well as the stylistic and conceptual priorities for your work.

GRE (Graduate Record Examination) SCORES
With the exception of MFA applicants, all applicants must take the general GRE test regardless of whether they are from the U.S. or abroad. To register for the GRE, go to Educational Testing Service at www.gre.org/. We will accept both the old and new GRE. Official test scores must be sent by ETS to the School of Design. The correct institution code to use when requesting scores is 2926 or 2674. You do not need a departmental code.

IELTS or TOEFL SCORES
All applicants whose native language is not English and whose undergraduate training has not been conducted in the English language must submit satisfactory certification of adequate English proficiency sufficient to pursue graduate study, both comprehension and expression in the spoken and written word. Applicants must submit scores of either the Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL) or the International English Language Testing System (IELTS Academic). Applicants may register for the IELTS at www.ielts.org. Applicants may register for the TOEFL at www.ets.org/toefl. The correct institution code to use when requesting official TOEFL scores is 2926 or 2984. You do not need a departmental code. Candidates admitted to the School of Design may be required to successfully complete an English Language Program prior to matriculation. They will be notified of this condition in their letter of admission. To be admitted without conditions, the Department of Architecture requires applicants to obtain a TOEFL score of 100 (iBT) or 600 (PBT) or higher, or an IELTS score of 7.5 or higher.

WRITING SAMPLE
M.S. in Architecture and Ph.D. applicants must submit a sample (e.g. essay, research report) of their written work in English on the subject of their field of specialization in addition to their personal statement. Applicants to the Master of Environmental Building Design and Master of Architecture Post-Professional degrees must submit two samples of writing and a description of their computing skills and software proficiency. Writing samples should be uploaded into the online application.

PORTFOLIO
Please click here for portfolio guidelines specific to each program. Please note that if you apply to a dual degree program, you may need to submit two portfolios if your programs require different formats or media. Please pay attention to the file size and page restrictions. Landscape portfolios must be paper. All other portfolios must be digital. Portfolios should be mailed to PennDesign Admissions, 110 Meyerson Hall, Philadelphia, PA 19104-6311. We will only return portfolios sent with a prepaid return envelope.

PORTFOLIO GUIDELINES: ARCHITECTURE

Digital portfolio guidelines for applicants to Architecture programs.

Department of Architecture Portfolio Guidelines
Every applicant to the Master of Architecture, Master of Environmental Building Design, Master of Science in Architecture, or PhD in Architecture program is required to submit a digital portfolio. Paper portfolios will NOT be accepted. The portfolio is a synopsis of one’s creative work. As a visual essay, it tells a story of a person’s interests, skills, and development over time. It should include projects that best express one’s visual, spatial, and constructional abilities. These projects might include drawings, paintings, sculpture, or photography; graphic, industrial, or interior design; architectural, landscape, or urban design. The faculty who evaluate the portfolios look less for competence in architectural or landscape architectural design and more for a coherent demonstration of visual and spatial abilities expressed through a basic understanding of material and construction. All work should be identified as academic, professional, or personal. If professional or team projects are included in the portfolio, the specific role and responsibility of the applicant in the production of the project must be clearly identified. Labels and writing should be kept to a minimum and clearly explain the work. Applicants to the MEBD and MArch II/PPD should include at least five fully developed projects done solely by the person submitting the portfolio; other group work can be added.

Applicants must submit their portfolios digitally. One PDF document of no more than twenty pages (maximum page size 10 x 12″), no more than 25 MB, and screen resolution 72 dpi should be submitted through our online application in the “Digital Portfolio Upload” section. No fewer than four projects should be included. The document should be saved as LastName_Program_MMDD (eg: Smith_MArch_1230).

 

 

University of Michigan, Taubman College of Architecture & Urban Planning

2000 Bonisteel Blvd
Ann Arbor, MI 48109-2069
United StatesMain Phone:             734-764-1300
Fax: 734-763-2322
E-mail: TaubmanCollegeStudentServices@umich.edu
Web site: www.taubmancollege.umich.edu
Monica Ponce de Leon, Dean

The Office of Undergraduate Admissions handles application procedures for incoming students. Students are required to apply online. To find out more about applying to Taubman College at the University of Michigan as an incoming freshman please review the information given below and visit the Office of Undergraduate Admissionswebsite. Prospective Freshmen are encouraged to apply as early as possible.

Undergraduate Admissions Contact

TaubmanCollegeStudentServices@umich.edu or             734-647-2187

Application and Portfolio/Design Assignment Deadline: February 1st annually

Application Materials

  • University of Michigan Online Application
  • University of Michigan Supplement
  • 2 letters of recommendation
    • Counselor Recommendation
    • Academic Teacher Recommendation
  • One Common Application essay (250-500 words) and two University of Michigan essays (250 and 500 words)
  • English Proficiency Test (non-native English speakers)
  • Nonrefundable application fee
  • Official Copy of transcripts from all high schools
  • SAT or ACT with writing test scores

Optional Application Materials

  • Third letter of recommendation
  • Portfolio or design assignment

All hard copy application materials, except portfolios, should be mailed to the Office of Undergraduate Admissions:
Office of Undergraduate Admissions
515 East Jefferson St.
Ann Arbor, MI 48109

Portfolio/Design Assignment

Freshman applicants may choose to submit an optional, but highly recommended portfolio or design assignment. All portfolios/design assignments must be submitted electronically. Slides, CDs,URLs, and hard copy materials will not be accepted.

Letters of Recommendation

Applicants are required to submit at least two letters of recommendation: one from a counselor and another from an academic teacher. An optional, additional letter of recommendation may be submitted that is not restricted to teachers or counselors.

ACT/SAT Scores Submission

Send your ACT or SAT scores directly to the University of Michigan-Ann Arbor. Your SAT/ACT test scores must be sent directly from the testing agency—rush paper scores are not accepted.

If you have not yet had your scores reported to the University of Michigan, you may request to have them sent online using these links:

  • ACT (U-M code is 2062)
  • SAT (U-M code is 1839)

English Proficiency Requirements

The University of Michigan requires a high level of proficiency in English and does not offer intensive English or conditional admission.

All speakers of English as a second language must submit one of the English language proficiency examination results listed below. We accept either MELAB, TOEFL, or IELTS results.

Minimum Scores:

  • MELAB: 80-85 range with section scores of at least 80
  • TOEFL (PBT): 570-600 range with section scores of at least 57
  • TOEFL (iBT): 88-100 range with section scores of at least 23 in listening and reading, and at least 21 in speaking and writing
  • IELTS: 6.5-7.0 range with section scores of at least 6.5

Exceptions: Students who have recently completed at least 4 years of rigorous academic study in Australia, The Bahamas, Canada (other than Quebec), New Zealand, the United Kingdom, or the United States (other than Puerto Rico) can be exempted if the SAT critical reading score is above 600.

Evaluation

Eligible applicants are considered for admission on the basis of the following criteria:

  • Quality and content of all previous academic education, motivation toward architecture-written statement of career goals, recommendations, and design work.
  • Transfer students must complete two years of college before enrolling in Taubman College. The first two years of liberal arts study before joining the undergraduate architecture program (the freshman and sophomore years) may be completed at the University of Michigan or at any other accredited university or community/junior college offering the required courses. Typically, undergraduates apply to transfer to Taubman College (from either UM or another school) during the winter term of sophomore year and, if accepted, begin the undergraduate Architecture Program junior year.
  • The undergraduate program culminates in a Bachelor of Science (B.S.), nonprofessional degree. Many students choose to continue their graduate studies in architecture or a related field in design or construction. Others work for a year or two in preparation for future graduate study.

    Current UM students are encouraged to discuss their academic plans with both their current academic advisor (through their home department) and a Taubman College Student Services Representative. Students applying to the undergraduate architecture program from other universities are encouraged to make an advising appointment with a Taubman College Admissions Counselor.

    TaubmanCollegeStudentServices@umich.edu or             734-615-0431

    Before beginning the undergraduate program junior year, applicants must complete the required prerequisite courses, as many recommended courses as possible and a minimum of 60 credit hours and maximum of 70 credit hours. Please refer to this page for information about prerequisite courses.

    Application Deadline: February 1st annually
    Portfolio Deadline: March 10th annually

    Application Materials
    (Cross Campus Students)

    • University of Michigan Online Application
    • Statement of Purpose / Essay (500 words)
    • Letter of recommendation and recommendation form from a non-architecture instructor
    • Portfolio
    Application Materials for Incoming Non-UM Students
    (New Transfer Students)

    • University of Michigan Online Application
    • One short answer (150 words) and three essays (250, 250 and 500 words)
    • 2 letters of recommendation and recommendation forms
    • Official transcripts from all high schools and colleges attended
    • Fee payable to the University of Michigan (online with a credit card or mail check or money order)
    • Portfolio

    All hard copy application materials, except portfolios, should be mailed in one package to the Office of Undergraduate Admissions:
    Office of Undergraduate Admissions
    515 East Jefferson St.
    Ann Arbor, MI 48109

    Portfolios should be mailed to Architecture Admissions:
    Undergraduate Architecture Admissions
    Room 2150
    Taubman College of Architecture and Urban Planning
    2000 Bonisteel Boulevard
    Ann Arbor, MI 48109-2069 USA

    Letters of Recommendation

    Cross-campus applicants: One letter of recommendation is required from a non-architecture professor or GSI. Please have the recommender complete the recommendation form and attach a letter on letterhead.

    New transfer applicants: Two letters of recommendation are required. Please request at least one from a college professor or Graduate Student Instructor. It would be preferable if both letters were from college instructors; one from a design instructor and one from a general academic course. Please have the recommenders complete the recommendation form and attach a letter on letterhead.

    Letter of Recommendation Form (PDF 1.1MB)

    English Proficiency Requirements

    The University of Michigan requires a high level of proficiency in English and does not offer intensive English or conditional admission.

    All speakers of English as a second language must submit one of the English language proficiency examination results listed below. We accept MELAB, TOEFL, or IELTS results.

    Minimum Scores

    • MELAB: 80-85 range with section scores of at least 80
    • TOEFL (PBT): 570-600 range with section scores of at least 57
    • TOEFL (iBT): 88-100 range with section scores of at least 23 in listening and reading, and at least 21 in speaking and writing
    • IELTS: 6.5-7.0 range with section scores of at least 6.5
    • Exceptions: Students who have recently completed at least 4 years of rigorous academic study in Australia, The Bahamas, Canada (other than Quebec), New Zealand, the United Kingdom, or the United States (other than Puerto Rico) can be exempted if the SAT critical reading score is above 600.

    Evaluation

    Eligible applicants are considered for admission on the basis of the following criteria:

    • Quality and content of all previous academic education
    • Other data, which indicates professional growth and motivation toward architecture-written statement of career goals, employment, record, letters of recommendation, portfolio, etc.

    Students who have completed freshman/sophomore studies at other universities or community colleges are evaluated on the same basis as those who have completed years 1 and 2 at the University of Michigan.

    Notification of Acceptance

    Applicants will be notified of their admission status by mid-April. Accepted applicants must return their Response Form to Taubman College by May 1st. All new transfer students must pay an enrollment deposit fee to the Office of Undergraduate Admissions.

    Wait List

    Being placed on a wait list means that the admissions committee is interested in your application, but have offered admission to other candidates. If space becomes available, students from the wait list may be offered admission. The wait list is unranked and when space becomes available, all waitlisted students will be reviewed again for admission. The chances of being admitted from the wait list vary from year to year.

    Registration and Orientation

    Students accepting their offer of admission will receive detailed registration and orientation information over the summer. Please do not attempt to register for architecture courses until you have received this information.

    Prerequisite Courses

    Before beginning the undergraduate architecture program junior year, applicants must complete the following required prerequisite courses, as many recommended courses as possible, and a minimum of 60 credit hours. If a student is completing prerequisite courses at another institution, it is important to check the transfer equivalency guide and contact an architecture advisor for architecture course equivalencies.
    UM Transfer Credit Equivalencies

    Required

    • 1 English course (3-4 credits)
    • 1 calculus course (4 credits)
    • 2 physics courses (lectures and labs) (8 credits)
    • 2 introductory architecture studio drawing courses (6 credits)

    Recommended

    • 2 architectural history courses (6 credits)
    • 1 digital media arts course (3 credits)
    • 1 natural science course* (3 credits)
    • 2 humanities courses (6 credits)
    • 2 social science courses (6 credits)

    *Chemistry must be selected for natural science if a student has not completed high school chemistry.

    Courses taken to fulfill required and recommended pre-arch requirements and those taken to fulfill the Bachelor of Science degree requirements may not be taken pass/fail.

    Since emphasis in the freshman and sophomore years is on liberal arts, not more than seven credits in non-academic or technical areas can be applied toward the 60 credit hour requirement.

    Prerequisite Courses Worksheet (PDF 52KB)

    Portfolio Guidelines

    Applicants to undergraduate program are required to submit evidence of their graphic and design abilities. Applicants should carefully select representative work that illustrates their ability to think and communicate visually and demonstrates the range and depth of their familiarity with various graphic media and techniques.

    Taubman College offers an annual portfolio workshop to help students prepare a portfolio of work. The workshop is usually offered in January. For more information, visit the events page.

    Portfolio evidence of graphic and design ability must comply with the following requirements:

    Content

    Work may include, but need not be limited to, examples of:

    • architectural design or building
    • drawing-freehand and/or mechanical
    • photography
    • interior, industrial, and graphic design
    • painting, printmaking, sculpture, and ceramics
    • woodworking, sewing, or other crafts
    • digital media

    Work submitted may include class assignments, independent projects, or examples from professional employment. If professional or group projects are submitted, the applicant must indicate the extent of his/her role in the work.

    Format

    The collection of samples submitted must be securely bound or fastened together and the overall dimensions should not exceed 8-1/2″ x 11″. Each submission must be clearly identified with the name of the applicant. DO NOT send original work. Please include reproductions of original works in the form of photocopies, prints, or photographs, reprinted and bound together. The committee will not review the following work:

    • models or other three-dimensional objects
    • slides
    • videotapes
    • folded materials/blueprints
    • electronic media (CDs, DVDs, disks) and/or digital files

    Deadline

    All graphic and design work must be received by Taubman College by March 10, 2013. Note that all paper application materials are due by February 1, 2013 to the Office of Undergraduate Admissions.

    Return

    Graphic work may be picked up at Taubman College after admission decisions have been made. Portfolios will be returned to applicants that submit a self-addressed, prepaid mailer, or sufficient postage. Work not sent back or picked up by July 1 will be discarded, unless special arrangements are made for its retention.

    Portfolio Workshop Presentation (PDF 12.7MB)
    D.I.Y. Bookmaking Guide (PDF 5.6MB)

    Graduate Admissions Eligibility:

    Taubman College offers two options to its Graduate Master of Architecture (M.Arch.) Program.

    2-Year Master of Architecture

    Applicants to the 2-year M.Arch. option should have a bachelor of science degree in architecture or its equivalent. Admitted 2-year M.Arch. students begin in the fall term.

    A student should have completed the following pre-requisite courses as part of their undergraduate degree in architecture.

    • 4 sequential architecture studio design courses (5-6 credits each course)
    • 2 construction courses (6 credits)
    • 2 structure courses (6 credits)
    • 2 sustainable systems courses (6 credits)
    • 2 history of architecture courses (6 credits)
    • 2 design fundamentals courses (6 credits)

    If any course deficiencies are found, the student must complete extra courses in addition to the regular 60 credit hours of the master of architecture curriculum.

    Please see course descriptions to compare pre-requisite course content from other schools to determine eligibility.

    3-Year Master of Architecture

    Applicants to the 3-year M.Arch. program have received an undergraduate degree in a subject other than architecture. Admission is limited to the summer half-term. This 3+ year program draws upon the diverse backgrounds of the students to encourage a multi-faceted discussion of architecture. The first year builds a foundation that drives the following years.

    There are two required pre-requisite courses that a student should have completed prior to beginning coursework in the summer half term (late June). These courses must be taken for credit at an accredited institution and the student must earn a C or better in the course. Online classes are not accepted. The two pre-requisites are:

    • 1 calculus course (4 credits)
    • 1 physics course (lecture and lab) (4 credits)

    We also highly recommend students interested in the 3-year M.Arch. program take two studio art courses. The purpose of the studio courses is to explore the design process and the art of making, thereby solidifying an interest in architectural study, and to create work to include in the admissions portfolio. Studio courses are strongly recommended but not required. Examples of studio courses include but are not limited to:

    • Drawing
    • Painting
    • Design (2D or 3D)
    • Woodworking
    • Ceramics
    • Sculpture
    • Printmaking
    • Metalworking
    • Fashion Design
    • Interior Design
    • Illustration
    • Animation
    • Jewelry Making
    • Photography

    3-year M.Arch. students join their peers in the 2-year M.Arch. track for the second and third year. Both options culminate in a master of architecture degree.

    TaubmanCollegeStudentServices@umich.edu
    734-764-1649

    Application and Portfolio Deadline: January 15th annually (postmarked)

    Please take the GRE test 6-8 weeks prior in order for test scores to be received by the deadline.

    Application Materials

    • Online Application
    • Non-refundable application fee: $65 U.S. / $75 fee non-U.S.
    • Statement of Purpose
    • Resume
    • Official transcripts from all universities/colleges attended
    • Portfolio
    • Three (3) letters of recommendation including recommendation forms
    • GRE Scores (required)
    • TOEFL test scores (required Non-native English Speakers)
    • Financial Certification documents (Non-U.S. Citizens)

    Submit any hard copy materials in one package/envelope to:

    Master of Architecture Admissions
    Taubman College of Architecture and Urban Planning
    2000 Bonisteel Boulevard
    Ann Arbor, MI 48109-2069 USA

    Do not have hard copy materials sent piecemeal.

    Non-refundable Application Fee

    The fee for United States Citizens and those with permanent resident visa status is $65 (U.S. funds). The fee for non-U.S. citizens is $75 (U.S. funds). The application fee is paid online, via credit card, before the application is submitted. There is no need to follow-up with a paper copy of the application. Applications received without fees will not be processed.

    Statement of Purpose

    Please write a concise statement outlining your reasons for applying to the master’s degree program and why your application should be favorably considered. The following questions serve only as a guide. It is preferred if your statement of purpose is uploaded as part of the online application. The essay should be 1000-1500 words and clearly communicate to the admissions committee:

    • Why you want to study architecture?
    • Your career objectives and long term goals?
    • What you want to learn/gain from the Program?
    • How the Program supports your career objectives?
    • What led you to apply to Taubman College?
    • Previous professional experiences that have had a profound effect?
    • Is there a specific area of emphasis/specialization that you are interested in?
    • Your current strengths and weaknesses in reaching your goals?

    Resume

    It is preferred if your resume is uploaded as part of the online application.

    Letters of Recommendation

    Three (3) letters of recommendation are required for all applicants. If possible, two of these should come from former professors. Recommendations should be completed online as part of the online application process. Please ask your recommenders to complete the online form and attach their letter electronically.

    In order to “see” the online recommendation section, in the online application, a term must be entered on the “Personal Information I” page. The recommendation section can then be viewed on the “Personal Information II” page.

    You can edit and send reminders to your recommenders clicking on the “Manage Your Recommenders” link in the recommendation section.

    If absolutely necessary, we will also accept hard copy recommendations if they are on university or company/firm stationery. The form and letter must be placed in an envelope, sealed, and signed across the seal by the recommender to ensure its authenticity. If submitting a hard copy, please have your recommender complete and attach the following recommendation form. Please request your letters of recommendation sufficiently early to ensure your recommenders submit their letters by the January 15th deadline.

    2-year M.Arch. Letter of Recommendation Form (PDF 1.1MB)
    3-year M.Arch. Letter of Recommendation Form (PDF 1.1MB)

    Official Transcripts

    The college requires applicants, domestic and international, to provide one official transcript or certified credentials (transcripts) from all universities and community colleges attended. Have two transcripts sent to your address. Have one of the transcripts sent in the original unopened envelope, sent in one package/envelope with your other hard copy materials. Do not have transcripts sent to Taubman College piecemeal. Open the second transcript, scan it, and upload the transcript in the “Previous Education” section of the online application. Unofficial transcripts can also be uploaded. If your academic credentials are in any language other than English, you must submit both the original document and a certified English translation. International credentials should include a certified copy of the diploma, if awarded. Applicants holding degrees from Bangladesh, Sri-Lanka, Burma, India, Nepal, or Pakistan must include detailed examination records for all years of the program showing subjects, marks received, and class obtained. UM graduates and current students do not need to submit a transcript from the University of Michigan but should request transcripts for any other schools they have attended.

    Graduate Record Examination Scores (required)

    The Graduate Record Examination (GRE) is required of all students. Information about the GRE including test dates and locations can be found at www.gre.org. Please contact ETS (www.ets.org or www.gre.org) to have an official score report sent to the University of Michigan (Institution code 1839, department code 4401) at least 4-5 weeks prior to the deadline. GRE scores must be no older than five-years old to be valid. There is no minimum requirement for the GRE test.

    English Proficiency

    All non-native English speakers must take either the TOEFL, IELTS, or the MELAB Examination. Scores must be no older than two years old to be valid. Non-native English speakers who have earned their degree from a university, where English is the primary language of instruction, are not required to submit a TOEFL, IELTS, or MELAB score. The student must have attended the institution for a minimum of four years, and achieved a 4 year degree from that institution to receive a TOEFL, IELTS, or MELAB waiver. U.S. citizenship does not exempt applicants from taking the TOEFL, IELTS, or MELAB test if his/her native language is not English. Students only need to take one of the above listed tests.

    TOEFL Examination (International Students Only)

    The Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL) or Internet Based Toefl (IBT) is one of the approved English proficiency tests required of all non-native English speakers. Information about the TOEFL/IBT including test dates and locations can be found at www.ets.org/toefl/. Please contact ETS (www.ets.org) and have an official score report sent to the University of Michigan (Institution code 1839, department code 12) at least 6-8 weeks prior to the January 15 deadline. TOEFL/IBT scores must be no older than two years old (not before 2010) to be valid. The minimum requirement for the TOEFL test is 250 computer based or 600 paper based. The minimum requirement for the IBT test is 100. If you have taken the TOEFL exam and not achieved the minimum score you must continue to take the test until you achieve the minimum score to be considered for admission. Taubman College does not admit students that have not met the minimum score.

    IELTS Examination (International Students Only)

    The International English Language Testing System exam is another English proficiency tool required of all non-native English speakers. Information about the IELTS including test dates and locations can be found atwww.ielts.org. Please have IELTS send an official score report to the University of Michigan.

    IELTS scores must be no older than 2 years (not before 2010) to be valid. The minimum requirement for the IELTS test is 7.0. If you have taken the IELTS exam and have not achieved the minimum score, you must continue to take the test until you reach 7.0 to be considered for admission. Taubman College does not admit students taht have not met the minimum score.

    MELAB Examination (International Students Only)

    Michigan English Language Assessment Battery (MELAB) Examination can be found atlsa.umich.edu/eli/testing/melab. Please take the MELAB exam 5 weeks prior to the January 15th deadline in order for your score to be received in time. The minimum score for the MELAB is 84.

    Financial Certification (International Students Only)

    The financial certificatino deadline is January 15th.

    All international students are required to submit financial certification as part of their application to show they have funding available to study in the USA. The estimated financial certification for 2012-2013 academic year for three-year M.Arch. applicants is $69,134 USD and for two-year M.Arch. applicants is $59,246 USD. The final tuition rates will be set in July and an exact figure will be available then. The Financial Certification does not consider the financial certification form when making decisions regarding scholarships. The financial certification is only an administrative piece and is necessary to process I-20 forms for admitted students. Only funds in a liquid account, such as a checking or savings account will be accepted: Property, life insurance, stock, bonds, jewelry, mutual funds, land, medical savings and retirement accounts, benefit certificates, trusts, securities, and long term savings for housing do not qualify. If a student is supporting him/herself, the applicant must submit an original bank statement in the student’s name showing sufficient funds. If a person other than the applicant will be sponsoring the student, the applicant must submit two important documents for the financial certification. An applicant must submit either #1 and #3 OR #2 and #3 below. An applicant may have several different sponsors. We will need the following documentation from each source of funding:

    1. Letter of support (who will support the student and what their relationship to the student is) signed by the family member(s) offering financial support to the student. It must be an original signature. OR

    2. Completed financial certification form (found in the online application) with original signatures from the family member(s) offering support and the proper boxes checked. AND

    3. Original bank statement (on bank letterhead) showing the type of account, the exact balance of the account, and signed by a bank representative (original signature required). The statement must also show the account holder’s name; that name must match the name of the person offering support exactly.

    2-Year M.Arch. Financial Certification Form (PDF 1.2MB)
    3-Year M.Arch. Financial Certification Form (PDF 1.2MB)

    Passport Copies (International Students Only)

    Each international applicant should submit a copy of their passport (and copies of any dependent family member’s passport that would be accompanying the student to the USA) with their application materials. Passport copies are required in order to process and I-20 form. In order to avoid processing delays, please submit the passport copies with your application materials.

    I-20 / Visa (International Students Only)

    Applicants that are currently in the U.S. should also send a copy of their current I-20 or I-94 form. A Transfer-In form is also required if an applicant is currently attending another U.S. school or college and is admitted to the program.

    Transfer-In Form (International Students Only)

    Transfer-In Form is also required if an international applicant is currently attending another U.S. school or college and is admitted to the program.

    Portfolio Guidelines

    All applicants are required to submit samples of their academic work and, if possible, their professional work. The following guidelines have been prepared by the Graduate Admissions Committee to help applicants select and prepare these samples.

    Content

    Samples of work should be chosen to cover the breadth as well as the depth of the applicant’s knowledge, abilities, and interests. The admissions committee is interested in work that demonstrates knowledge, interest, and ability in technical areas, human and social concerns, and symbolic and aesthetic issues. The committee considers the following types of work to be suitable for inclusion with an applicant’s samples: graphic design, photography, paintings, freehand drawings, building design drawings, analytical investigations (structural and environmental systems), building programming, measured and working drawings, computer generated drawings, and other types of work which best represent the applicant’s knowledge, aptitudes, and experience. The portfolio should be considered a design problem.

    Portfolios from applicants to the 3 year M.Arch. Program will usually include samples of freehand drawings, graphic design, photography, paintings, sculpture, ceramics, woodworking, and samples of work as noted above where appropriate.

    The committee encourages applicants to submit reproductions of work instead of originals and to be judicious in the choice of reproduction methods. The committee will assume that copies represent the actual quality of the original work in regard to line character, color, value, finish, and other visual characteristics. Slides, transparencies, CD’s, blueprints, or videos will not be accepted. Each exhibit should be labeled neatly with information describing the medium used, whether the work represents an academic, professional, or other type of project, and whether the work was undertaken independently or as part of a group effort. For professional and group projects, the label should indicate the type and extent of the applicant’s personal involvement.

    Size and Format

    The collection of samples submitted with the application must be securely bound or fastened together and the overall dimensions should not exceed 8 1/2″ x 11″. Do not use a mailing tube. When you submit a portfolio as part of your application, it becomes property of the University of Michigan. If you would like to have your portfolio returned to you after admission decisions are made you must submit one of the following with your application materials:

    • A prepaid, self addressed/labeled envelope
    • Proper postage to cover the cost of returning the portfolio to you
    • A check made payable to: The University of Michigan, to cover the cost of returning the portfolio to you

    Please do not send international postal coupons. Taubman College will not return portfolios to applicants unless one of the above mentioned procedures is followed.

    Portfolio Workshop Presentation (PDF 12.1MB)
    D.I.Y. Bookmaking Guide (PDF 1.5MB)

    Application Evaluation / Status

    Evaluation

    Applications will not be evaluated until all credentials have been received and the application fee has been paid. Applications missing credentials cannot be guaranteed a review by the admissions committee. Eligible applicants are considered for admission on the basis of the following criteria:

    1. Quality and content of all previous academic education
    2. Evidence of professional commitment and direction, including statement of purpose, resume, letters of recommendation, portfolio, etc.
    3. GRE test scores / TOEFL test scores (if applicable)
    4. The number of openings available
    5. The suitability of the program to the applicant’s area of interest

    Checking the Status of Your Application Online

    Applicants can verify application data and status online approximately one week after their application is submitted. An email is sent, by the admissions office, with the applicant’s University of Michigan Identification Number (UMID). You will need to use a login ID and password to confirm some personal data before viewing your application status. The site allows you to update your contact information, check the receipt of your application materials and receive an admission decision online. Student Service Staff will try to keep all materials received current. However, please allow sufficient time for processing before contacting the office.

    For applicants who are current students or employees: Log in to Wolverine Access using your existing UMICH uniqname login and click “New and Prospective Student Business.”

    For applicants new to the University: You need to create a secure login using a UM Friend Account and then go to and log in to the UM administrative services called Wolverine Access. To do this, you MUST follow both steps below:

    1. Create a UM Friend Account.
    2. Log into Wolverine Access. Once logged in, open “New and Prospective Student Business.”

    Taubman College receives a large volume of application materials, so please allow 10 business days for processing time. Your application materials will be updated as quickly as possible.

    Residency Classification

    Residency Classification Guidelines have been developed to ensure that decisions about whether a student pays in-state or out-of-state tuition are fair and equitable and that applicants for admission or enrolled students who believe they are Michigan residents understand they may be required to complete an Application for Resident Classification and provide additional information to document their residency status. Please see the University of Michigan Residency Classification Guidelines.

    Notification of Acceptance

    Applicants will be notified of their admission status by mid-to-late-March. Admission decisions will be accessible online using the web application status as soon as they are made. Taubman College will send a hard copy letter in the mail as well. Admitted students are invited to Preview Weekend, in late March: Preview Weekend is an opportunity for admitted students to visit Taubman College, meet faculty and students, tour the facilities, campus, and Ann Arbor, and attend Taubman College events. Admitted students can be paired up with current students for lodging. Typically travel reimbursements, up to a maximum of $300, is offered. Students choosing to accept admission must pay a $500 enrollment deposit either through an online banking transfer (US based banks only) or via check by April 15th to reserve a space in the program.

    Wait List

    Being placed on the wait list means that the admissions committee is interested in your application but have offered admission to other candidates. If space becomes available, students from the wait list may be offered admission. The wait list is unranked and, if space becomes available, all waitlisted students will be reviewed again for admission. The chances of being admitted from the wait list vary from year to year.

 

 

University of Miami, School of Architecture

P.O. Box 249178
Coral Gables, FL 33124-5010
United StatesMain Phone:             305-284-5000
Fax: 305-284-5245
E-mail: epz@miami.edu
Web site: http://www.arc.miami.edu/
Dean Elizabeth Plater-Zyberk, Distinguished Professor & Dean

 

PORTFOLIO REQUIREMENTS

Admission & Portfolio Requirements

Application Information

The policies and procedures for application and admission are as follows:

All application materials (application, transcripts, portfolio and letters of recommendation) must be postmarked no later than November 1st (Early Action/Decision) or January 1st (Regular Decision); for more information contact the Admissions Office or Academic Services at 305-284-3731. No applications or application materials will be accepted after this time. Enrollment in the School of Architecture is selective and limited by space and other resources; early application is encouraged.

Undergraduate Admission

Applications for incoming freshmen are processed and reviewed by the Office of Admissions.

The University of Miami uses a holistic admission process in which all parts of a student’s application are considered. Every application receives a full and comprehensive evaluation. We base our admission decision on the student’s academic strength and how competitive that student is in the applicant pool.

There is no minimum GPA or test score requirement for admission. The Admission Committee does not recalculate high school GPAs. We use the GPA (weighted and/or unweighted) provided by your high school. Although not a requirement, a competitive freshman student for admission has a strong A-/B+ average, around a 1320 SAT and/or around a 30 ACT test score, and ranks in the top 10% of their graduating class. All School of Architecture applicants are required to submit a portfolio.

Keep in mind that a student who meets all of these criteria is not guaranteed admission; however, the closer a student is to this profile, the more competitive that student is for admission.

Transfer Admission

Applications for transfer are processed by the University of Miami Office of Admissions and are reviewed by the Architecture Undergraduate Faculty Admissions Committee. Portfolios and letters of recommendation are to be submitted to the School of Architecture.

The minimum requirements for transfer admission are:

 

  1. 3.0 minimum Grade Point Average
  2. Three letters of recommendation
  3. Portfolio is required for advanced placement. Design studio work must be included.

 

Summer Studio: Students accepted for transfer into the third year design sequence are required to attend a design studio held the summer before their third year. Admission to the Bachelor of Architecture program is subject to satisfactory performance in this design class.

University of Miami Students: Students currently enrolled at the University of Miami in another major who are requesting transfer into the School of Architecture must fill out a “Change of Major” request form and send it to the School of Architecture. Admission is subject to review by the Architecture Faculty Undergraduate Admissions Committee. Students with less than 24 academic credits will be considered as entering freshmen, while those who have completed 24 or more credits will be asked to submit a portfolio. Please note that students enrolled in other majors are not permitted to take required architecture classes and will be advised by the School in which they are registered.

Students Holding a Previous Degree: Applications are not accepted from students who have an undergraduate degree. These students should apply to the Master of Architecture Professional Degree Program. For more information, contact the Office of Academic Services at 305-284-3731.

Graduate Admission

Applications are considered for entrance in the fall semester only. Applications completed by February 15 will be given the highest priority for acceptance and scholarships; late applications will be accepted until April 1. Admission to the graduate program is subject to the rules, regulations and procedures of the Graduate School as stipulated in the University Graduate Bulletin. It is the responsibility of each student to understand these requirements and to ensure that they are met.

The minimum requirements for application to the Master of Architecture Degree program are:

  1. 3.0 cumulative grade point average.
  2. 1000 cumulative Graduate Record Examination score (GRE) on verbal and quantitative sections for all texts taken before September 2011 / New test scores equivalency will be announced in November 2011 after statistical analysis.
  3. 550 TOEFL score for international applicants.

 

Applications will be reviewed by the admissions committees only after all of the following documents have been received:

  1. Completed application form with the $65.00 application fee. We regret that it is not possible to waive this fee.
  2. A letter or statement expressing your interest in the program and your reasons for applying.
  3. Official transcripts of all college and university courses taken, indicating the date your professional or other undergraduate degree was awarded. All transcripts must be sent directly from the institution’s registrar.
  4. Official Graduate Record Examination scores sent directly from ETS and TOEFL scores where applicable.
  5. Three academic (and professional if applicable) letters of recommendation. If you have waived your right for access to your letters, they may be sent directly from the recommender, or they may be included with your application in a signed and sealed envelope.
  6. Digital portfolio and printed portfolio.

 

Portfolio Requirements for Undergraduate Programs

The portfolio requirement offers candidates an opportunity to share their visual interests. The work may include but is not limited to reproductions of: drawings, paintings, photographs, mixed-media, graphics, or photographs of ceramics, sculpture, wood-work, and models. Freehand drawings are strongly encouraged while CAD or drafting assignments are not required nor encouraged. Slides and electronic media will not be viewed and therefore should not be included in the portfolio.

Each student may determine the binder or folder that best contains the work. Simple, easy-to-turn pages that are well organized have a greater impact than expensive binders or complicated systems.

The portfolio format is as follows:

  1. Preferred size is 8.5 X 11 inches (horizontal or vertical).
  2. Cover page (inside the portfolio) with name, program you are applying for: (freshman or transfer), mailing address, email address, and telephone number.
  3. Each project or image must be accompanied by a written description of when the piece was done, why (for class,individually, etc.) and, if the work is part of a group project, exactly which part of the project reflects the candidate’s work.

 

A self-addressed, postage pre-paid envelope must be included for portfolio return. Portfolios are not retained after the application process.

University of Miami
School of Architecture
Office of Academic Services
Re: Undergraduate Portfolio
1223 Dickinson Drive, Bldg 48E
Coral Gables, FL 33146-5010
Any questions, call 305-284-3731

Portfolio Requirements for Graduate Programs

The portfolio offers candidates to the MArch.I / 3-year track an opportunity to present their visual interests and artistic skills. The work may include but is not limited to: reproductions of drawings, paintings, ceramics, sculpture, woodwork; photographs; video work; models. Although drafting (CAD or hand-drawing) courses are not required for admission in the 3-year program, students who want to include such drawings are encouraged to do so.

Students applying for advanced standing (MArch.II / 2-year track) must present a selection of their best architectural works during their pre-professional studies. In order to facilitate the waiving of courses and studios, examples must emphasize comprehensive skills including sketches, plans, sections and elevations, and graphics that exhibit conceptual and diagramming abilities, understanding of structures and of urban context, as well as any other skills (computer modeling, models, photography and film abilities, etc.). Examples of professional work are encouraged but must clearly identify and describe work done independently and that done as part of a team.

Each student is required to provide a digital portfolio in pdf format (maximum size 6MB) as well as a printed copy. Preferred size is 8.5 × 11 inches (11” x 14” maximum-size). Digital portfolio can be sent by mail in CD or DVD format, or by email directly to Jude Alexander. Expensive and creative binders are not necessary; ease of review with simple, easy-to-turn pages should be a priority with a preference for Internet-type prints.

Each portfolio must include and in the following order:

 

  1. Cover with full name and citizenship
  2. First page with name, address and telephone number; and a one-page resume maximum
  3. Personal works as described above with clear indication of the academic year in the program; objectives and site of the project; short description of the project concept.

 

A self-addressed, postage pre-paid envelope must be included for portfolio return. Portfolios are not retained after the application process.

University of Miami
School of Architecture
Office of Academic Services
Re: Graduate Portfolio
1223 Dickinson Drive, Bldg 48E
Coral Gables, FL 33146-5010
Any questions, call 305-284-3060

Letters of Recommendation

Three letters of academic recommendation are required of each transfer applicant. Applicants with an architectural background should request letters from their architecture professors. Professional recommendations may be submitted in addition to the three required academic letters. Letters are not to be included in the portfolio. Please mail your letters of recommendation to:

 

University of Kansas, School of Architecture & Urban Planning

205 Marvin Hall
1465 Jayhawk Blvd.
Lawrence, KS 66045-2250
United StatesMain Phone:             785-864-4281
Fax: 785-864-5393
E-mail: archku@ku.edu
Web site: http://www.saup.ku.edu/
Mr. Nils Gore, Interim chair & Associate Professor

College of Architecture, Planning and Design


Timothy de Noble, Dean
Lynn Ewanow, Associate Dean
Wendy Ornelas, Associate Dean

115 Seaton Hall
785-532-5950
Fax: 785-532-6722
E-mail: capd@k-state.edu
www.capd.k-state.edu

The College of Architecture, Planning and Design offers opportunities for professional study in architecture, interior architecture and product design, landscape architecture, and regional and community planning.

The college consists of three academic departments: architecture, interior architecture and product design, and landscape architecture and regional and community planning.

The curriculum in architecture is accredited by the National Architectural Accrediting Board (NAAB). The interior architecture and product design curriculum is accredited by Council for Interior Design Accreditation (CIDA), and the National Association of Schools of Art and Design (NASAD). The landscape architecture curricula are accredited by the Landscape Architectural Accreditation Board (LAAB). The planning curriculum is accredited by the American Institute of Certified Planners (AICP) in cooperation with the Association of Collegiate Schools of Planning (ACSP).

Accredited graduate degrees are offered in architecture, interior architecture and product design, landscape architecture, and regional and community planning to students who have not completed a bachelor’s degree. Accredited graduate degrees in landscape architecture and regional and community planning are offered to students who already hold a bachelor’s degree. The master of science in architecture is intended for students who already hold an accredited bachelor of architecture.

A PhD in Environmental Design and Planning with the primary objective of supporting graduate research which employs an interdisciplinary view of design and planning is also offered.

Click on any of the following links for information:

Admission Policies and Procedures

High school applicants

In addition to meeting the university’s admission requirements, first-year admission to the College of Architecture, Planning and Design is based upon the review of high school cumulative GPA and composite  ACT or SAT scores. Admission is selective and competitive, application does not guarantee admission.

Emphasis is placed upon performance in academic course work. The college can admit up to 180 new students. You must apply prior to the deadline stated below because of the limited space and resources for new students admitted into the program. The college does not admit freshman or transfer students for the spring semester.

Application materials and deadline

Materials

  1. Application for undergraduate admission with the College of Architecture, Planning and Design clearly marked as your intended major.
  2. University application fee.
  3. Official 6th or 7th semester high school transcript.
  4. Official ACT or SAT scores (unofficial scores are accepted if indicated on the official transcript).

Send application materials directly to:

Office of Admissions
Kansas State University
119 Anderson Hall
Manhattan, KS 66506–0102

Deadline: February 1

To ensure consideration, application materials must be postmarked by February 1.

College preparatory curriculum

Students are advised to take a full academic course load each year of high school to meet requirements for the recommended college preparatory curriculum. If honors courses and advanced placement courses are available, students are encouraged to take them. In particular, advanced placement courses in calculus and English are helpful. However, the GPA used for admission is unweighted. Courses that develop creative abilities should be taken if time permits. With respect to drawing, the faculty strongly recommends taking a course in freehand drawing. If a choice must be made between technical drawing, CAD, or freehand drawing, the faculty prefers freehand drawing.

The following high school curriculum is highly recommended:

Course Units
Mathematics (Algebra I, geometry, Algebra II, and trigonometry
(pre-calculus or calculus is highly recommended))
3–4
English (emphasis on critical thinking, reading, and writing) 4
Science (Physics, chemistry, and biology) 3–4
Social studies 3–4
Foreign language 2–4

 

Transfer applicants

A student’s academic performance in college-level course work is an important indicator of future academic performance. Students must have a college grade point average of at least a 3.0 to be considered for admission. However, being considered does not guarantee admission. Please note that all admission decisions are contingent upon maintaining or exceeding the standards. Students who do not continue to meet or exceed the stated expectations may not be allowed to enroll. Transfer students will be placed in the first year.

Students must have completed the following high school mathematics courses prior to arriving at Kansas State University:

  • Two units of algebra
  • One unit of geometry
  • One-half unit of trigonometry

Mathematics courses not taken in high school may be taken at other universities, community colleges, correspondence schools, night schools, or with a private tutor.

Students should contact the College of Architecture, Planning and Design’s Office of Student Services at            785-532-5047       for advice about the transfer process. It is a good idea to establish contact with the associate dean before enrolling in college courses.

Application materials and deadline

Materials

  1. Application for undergraduate admission with College of Architecture, Planning and Design clearly marked as your intended major.
  2. University application fee.
  3. Official college transcript(s) for all schools.

Send application materials directly to:

Office of Admissions
Kansas State University
119 Anderson Hall
Manhattan, KS 66506–0102

Deadline: February 1
To ensure consideration, application materials must be postmarked by February 1.

Second-, third-, fourth-, or fifth-year placement
Students who have attended another National Architectural Accrediting Board (NAAB), Landscape Architectural Accreditation Board (LAAB), or Council for Interior Design Accreditation (CIDA) accredited program may be considered for placement in the second, third, fourth, or fifth year of one of our degree programs. However, it is exceedingly rare for a student to be offered a placement other than first year. Prospective transfer students should follow the procedures described in this document and submit course descriptions for all the professional program courses and a portfolio of work completed in design studio. Studio placement will be determined by means of individual portfolio reviews by the faculty. Portfolios must be sent to the associate dean in  212 Seaton Hall, Manhattan, Kansas 66506 and be postmarked no later than February 1.

For more information

For more information about College of Architecture, Planning and Design programs, write or call:

Director of Student Recruitment
College of Architecture, Planning and Design
Kansas State University
212 Seaton Hall
Manhattan, KS 66506–2902
785-532-5047
Fax: 785-532-6722
E-mail: archdesstuserv@k-state.edu
www.capd.k-state.edu

For more information about admission to Kansas State University, write or call:

Office of Undergraduate Admissions
Kansas State University
119 Anderson Hall
Manhattan, KS 66506–0102
E-mail: k-state@k-state.edu
1-800-432-8270       (toll free)
or             785-532-6250

 

General Education: K-State 8

IMPORTANT NOTES: Students who first enroll in Summer 2011 or later must meet the requirements of the K-State 8 General Education Program.

Students who began their programs of study in earlier terms under the University General Education (UGE) program may complete their degrees with UGE requirements or may choose to move to the K-State 8. Students should check with their academic advisors to determine which choice would be better. To switch, students must consult with their academic advisors.

Students who are readmitted in Summer 2011 and later will be designated as meeting the K-State 8 by the Office of Admissions. Deans’ offices can make an exception for the readmitted student who has completed UGE or who would prefer to complete UGE requirements.

Overview of K-State 8 requirements

The intent of The K-State 8 is for students to explore the perspectives of disciplines that may be quite different from those of their own majors. For that reason, a minimum of four different course prefixes (e.g., AGEC, MATH, FSHS) must be represented to fulfill K-State 8 requirements.

Each student must successfully complete credit-bearing courses to cover all of the K-State 8 areas. Some of the K-State 8 areas may be covered in the student’s major.

Departments have decided which courses to designate for one or two K-State 8 areas. K-State 8 designations are noted both in the Undergraduate Catalog and in iSIS.

When a course is tagged for two K-State 8 areas, the student may count that course toward both areas. However, students are strongly encouraged to enroll in a variety of courses and experiences that offers them a genuine breadth of perspective.

For more information

  • Consult your advisor.
  • Check each term’s Course Schedule.
  • More information about The K-State 8 is available on the web.

K-State 8 policy for changing majors

Changing majors will not affect students’ general education requirements in the K-State 8.

K-State 8 policy for double majors and dual degrees

A student must meet K-State 8 requirements for only one degree/major.

Transfer students

Transfer students are required to cover all eight (8) of the K-State 8 areas and should check with their academic advisors to determine how best to apply transfer credits to the K-State 8.

 

General Education: UGE

University General Education Requirements

IMPORTANT NOTES:  This section does not apply to students who first enroll in Summer 2011 or later. Those students must meet the requirements of The K-State 8 General Education Program.

Students who began their programs of study in earlier terms under the University General Education (UGE) program may complete their degrees with UGE requirements or may choose to move to The K-State 8. Students should check with their academic advisors to determine which choice would be better.  To switch, students must consult with their academic advisors.

Students who are readmitted in Summer 2011 and later will be designated as meeting the K-State 8 by the Office of Admissions. Deans’ offices can make an exception for the readmitted student who has completed UGE or who would prefer to complete UGE requirements.

The following information about UGE remains in the Undergraduate Catalog for the benefit of students who choose to continue meeting UGE requirements.

The College of Architecture, Planning and Design assures that all degree programs provide breadth through the completion of 18 credit hours to fulfill the university’s general education requirements. These 18 credit hours must be approved university general education courses from outside the professional major designation.

At least 6 credit hours of the 18 credit hours must be taken in courses numbered 300 or above and no more than two courses from any single discipline (as defined by the course prefix) may be counted toward the required 18 credit hours of university general education electives.

Courses used to fulfill university general education credit cannot be in the student’s major.

Students develop their programs of university general education with the ongoing assistance of their academic advisor.

Those electives listed with a specific designation, such as professional, must be chosen from those courses in the indicated field that are open to the student.

For more information about UGE requirements, see the Undergraduate Degrees section of this catalog. For a current list of approved UGE courses, see the Registrar’s Office website.

 

Student academic creations

All programs involve extensive project work. Students are advised to budget sufficient funds to cover the cost of equipment, materials, and supplies. Material costs will be higher than those published for non-studio curricula.

Student academic creations are subject to Kansas State University and Board of Regents intellectual property policies. The Regents policy states:

‘‘The ownership of student works submitted in fulfillment of academic requirements shall be with the creator(s). The student, by enrolling in the institution, gives the institution a non-exclusive royalty-free license to mark on, modify, retain the work as may be required by the process of instruction, or otherwise handle the work as set out in the institution’s intellectual property policy or in the course syllabus. The institution shall not have the right to use work in any other manner without the written consent of the creator(s).’’ ‘‘Otherwise handle,’’ as referenced in this policy, includes display of student work in various media and use for accreditation purposes.

K-State’s intellectual property policy.

 

International study

Students can earn academic credit by studying abroad in Italy, Denmark, Germany or  the Czech Republic. Specific information is available from the associate dean of student services.

 

Internship

Internships are available with private practitioners, corporations, and government agencies. Students earn academic credit and a salary while on internship. Specific requirements vary among the departments.

 

Extracurricular activities

The college offers opportunities for students to become involved in student government, student chapters of professional societies, college ambassadors, first year mentors, Open House, and the student journal,OZ.


University of Cincinnati, The School of Architecture & Interior Design

College of Design, Architecture, Art, and Planning
P.O. Box 210016
Cincinnati, OH 45221-0016
United StatesMain Phone:             513-556-6426
Fax: 513-556-1230
E-mail: susan.baehr@uc.edu
Web site: http://www.daap.uc.edu/said
Mr. William D. Williams, Director School of Architecture and Interior Design

Admission Requirements

The School of Architecture and Interior Design bases admission decisions on a balanced consideration of the following indications of excellence:

  • A baccalaureate degree from a recognized college or university
  • Official transcripts from previous college coursework.
    • Note: Successful candidates have earned, on average, a GPA of 3.30(based on a 4.00 scale).
  • A portfolio of creative work. The portfolio is an opportunity to demonstrate your imaginative and critical thinking talents. Creativity occurs in all fields so the content does not have to be architectural if your background is in another discipline. Written project statements to accompany visual work are usually very helpful to the committee.
  • 3 letters of recommendation from persons who are in a position to evaluate your abilities and your potential for success as a graduate student.
  • A brief resumé of your academic and professional experiences
    • Note: Your resumé should indicate both educational and professional accomplishments.
  • A two-page statement of your interest in graduate study in Architecture. This should be a concise, articulate presentation of your academic and career goals, and any specific interests you have in architectural topics for graduate research and design. It should reflect your prior intellectual and professional engagement with these issues, and may also provide some additional perspective on the work illustrated in the portfolio.
  • The Graduate Record Exam (GRE). For test dates prior to August 1,2011 successful candidates have earned the following average scores: verbal 500; quantitative 650; analytic 4.5. For test dates after August 1, 2011 (GRE Revised General Test) successful candidates have earned the following average scores: verbal 153; quantitative 151; analytic 4.5. The ETS University code is 1833. You do not need a department code.
  • A TOEFL score of at least 100 iBT (600 paper) is common, although not a strict requirement. We also accept test results from the IELTS with scores of at least 7 and the CEFR of at least B2.

Application Process

Applications and all supplemental materials are due by January 10, 2012. The application process begins with an online application to the Graduate School. Supplemental materials (except transcripts) are to be submitted online through the application process.
Mail transcripts to the address below. Air Express companies may require the street address (2624 Clifton Avenue) instead of the PO Box number, and also the office phone number (            513.556.6426      ) for the label.
University of Cincinnati
College of DAAP
PO Box 210016
Cincinnati, OH 45221-0016
Attn: Kim Lawson
Applicants are typically notified in late March and April, but the admissions process can extend into May and June. We cannot offer admission deferrals. International students should refer to the International Student Services Office for University admissions information and requirements.

Important Additional Information

All Master’s candidates benefit from having a liberal arts education that includes coursework in Art History, Physics, and Drawing or Studio Art. Physics is a highly recommended course subject because it servers as the basis for many concepts in the sequence of technical courses. Experience/prior applied knowledge of Photoshop, Illustrator, etc. is also highly desirable.

 

 

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Case Study: Student – M.Arch.I candidate – with NO design background, admitted into U.C. Berkeley’s

for questions or to schedule a FREE intro session, please contact:

phone: 347.236.4407 or
email: elosdesign@gmail.com

Portfolio Design and strategic Admissions Consulting for Schools of Architecture

Case Study: Student – M.Arch.I Candidate – with B.A. in Architectural Studies, admitted into Harvard GSD

for questions or to schedule a FREE intro session, please contact:

phone: 347.236.4407 or
email: elosdesign@gmail.com

Portfolio Design and strategic Admissions Consulting for Schools of Architecture

Case Study: Student with B.Arch., admitted into UPenn’s post-professional Grad program

for questions or to schedule a FREE intro session, please contact:

phone: 347.236.4407 or
email: elosdesign@gmail.com

Portfolio Design and strategic Admissions Consulting for Schools of Architecture

Case Study: Student – M.Arch.I Candidate – w/ B.A. in Arch. Studies – Admitted into Yale

for questions or to schedule a FREE intro session, please contact:

phone: 347.236.4407 or
email: elosdesign@gmail.com

Portfolio Design and strategic Admissions Consulting for Schools of Architecture

Case Study: Student – M.Arch.I Candidate – w/ B.A. in Civil engineering and NO design Background – Admitted into U.C. Berkeley

for questions or to schedule a FREE intro session, please contact:

phone: 347.236.4407 or
email: elosdesign@gmail.com

Southern California Institute of Architecture

960 E. Third Street
Los Angeles, CA 90013
United StatesMain Phone:             213-613-2200
Fax: 213-613-2260
E-mail: admissions@sciarc.edu
Web site: http://www.sciarc.edu/
Eric Owen Moss, Director

Undergraduate Admissions
The undergraduate program at SCI-Arc is a five-year (ten-term) professional Bachelor of Architecture (B.Arch) program, accredited by the the National Architectural Accrediting Board (NAAB).

The first two years of the undergraduate program are sequential by term. Students are admitted into 1A or 2A in the fall term only, while admission into 1B and 2B is in the spring term only. Students seeking to enter SCI-Arc at the 3A, 3B, or 4A level may apply for admission in either the fall, spring, or summer terms.

The undergraduate program admits approximately seventy students per year. Students may apply directly from high school or may transfer from two- or four-year colleges. Applications for first-year placement are accepted for the fall term; applications for advanced placement are accepted for the fall and spring terms. Admission to the undergraduate program is competitive, and applicants must generally have a GPA of 3.0 or higher, in addition to a distinctive portfolio of work. Students who have completed general, non-architecture courses at other two- or four-year colleges may apply for placement in the first year of the B.Arch program. These include students who have completed associate degrees (A.A. or A.S.) in disciplines other than Architecture. Admission is based on the applicant’s personal statement, creative portfolio, academic record and letters of recommendation.

Graduate Admission
Students are admitted into the graduate programs in the fall term only. Admission is determined by a review of the applicant’s personal statement, letters of recommendation, academic record, and portfolio of architectural and creative work. SCI-Arc offers two graduate programs—MArch 1 and MArch 2 (see below)— as well as three post-graduate programs:

M.ARCH 1

A three year (seven term) professional Master of Architecture program, accredited by the National Architectural Accrediting Board (NAAB) and open to applicants who hold a bachelor’s degree or equivalent in any field of study.M.Arch 1 requires attendance for the fall and spring terms of the first two years, and the fall, spring and summer terms of the final year.

Prerequisites for M.Arch 1: 

Prospective M.Arch 1 students are required to complete one semester each of college-level Calculus and Physics, obtaining a grade of “C+” or higher. Accepted students who have not yet taken these courses will receive a Conditional Acceptance into the program, and will be required to complete these prerequisites prior to enrolling in the fall term.
Making + Meaning
The Foundation Program in Architecture offered at SCI-Arc in the summer term, is recommended as a preparatory course (and in some cases required) for admission to the program.
To apply online, click HERE or visit the Making+Meaning page.

M.ARCH 2

A two year (five term) professional Master of Architecture program, accredited by the National Architectural Accrediting Board (NAAB) and open to applicants with a minimum of a four-year degree in Architecture, or its equivalent abroad.M.Arch 2 requires attendance for the fall and spring terms of the first year, and the fall, spring and summer terms of the final year.

Prerequisites for M.Arch 2: 

Introduction to Digital Design – a short, intensive workshop offered prior to the fall term – is intended to provide entering students with the foundation in digital tools necessary to successfully undertake the demands of the M.Arch 2 program.

 

 

Rice University, School of Architecture

6100 Main Street
MS 50
Houston, TX 77005-1892
United StatesMain Phone:             713-348-4864
Fax: 713-348-5277
E-mail: arch@rice.edu
Web site: www.arch.rice.edu
Dr. Sarah Whiting, Dean

Undergraduate Admissions

 

Undergraduate applicants to the School of Architecture follow the normal admissions procedures for Rice University. Please refer to Rice University’s undergraduate admission web page for complete application information, requirements and schedules: www.rice.edu/admission.

In addition to University requirements, the School of Architecture strongly recommends an interview and requires a portfolio, as detailed below.

 

 

Recommended Interview

The School of Architecture strongly recommends that all applicants arrange for an interview on the Rice campus with an Architecture faculty member. Such an interview can be arranged by calling the School of Architecture at:             713.348.4864      .

 

 

Portfolio Requirement

A portfolio of creative work is required of all applicants to the School of Architecture. The Portfolio must conform to the following specifications:

PowerPoint file labeled with applicant name (example: JohnDoe.ppt) – 10 MB maximum file size – 10 slides maximum (more than one image per slide acceptable) – Image files must be JPG, JPEG, or GIF – No image should exceed 1024 x 768 pixel resolution & 96 dots/inch – No sound or animation permitted – Email your portfolio to the Admission Office at riceapps@rice.edu

Graduate Admissions

 

The deadline for completed graduate applications is December 31. The School of Architecture must receive all items listed below for your application to be considered complete.

You should begin your application process early. To make sure scores are available by the deadline you should take the GRE, TOEFL, etc. as required the spring before you apply. You should also request transcripts and letters of recommendation as soon as you know that you plan to apply in order to give the senders time to get the material to Rice before the deadline.

Please download our Application Checklist to ensure that you’ve met all of the requirements.

 

Rice School of Architecture Admissions Requirements:

Application Form
Application Fee
Transcripts (official required, unofficial optional)
GRE Scores
Portfolio (digital and hard-copy)
Personal Statement
TOEFL Requirements
Option Selection
Letters of Recommendation

 

Application Form

The application form is only one piece of your application package, and may be accessed here.

 

Application Fee

All graduate application materials are submitted online (with the exception of the hard-copy portfolio and official transcripts). Applicants have the option to pay the application fee with a credit card or an online check. The fee is seventy U.S. dollars (U.S. $70.00). An applicant whose online check is returned for insufficient funds will be charged an additional fee of $10.

Note to Foreign Applicants:The application fee is required of all applicants, including foreign students. We recognize that some foreign students may have difficulty with currency exchange. Payment of the fee cannot be deferred until time of enrollment. The application can be processed ONLY when the application fee has been received. The check must be payable through a U.S. bank, which must be noted on the front of the check; we can also accept an international money order. Sometimes an applicant will ask a U.S. friend or relative to submit the fee on his/her behalf; however, be sure that the applicant’s name and department are clearly indicated on the front of the check. No application will be processed without this fee.

 

Letters of Evaluation

Three letters are required and must be submitted through the online process initiated through your application. It is always our preference to have academic references representing your major field, though we recognize that there are situations where this may not be possible. In such circumstances, we encourage you to seek out those persons who can comment on qualities that will be relevant to your academic goals. Requests for online letters of recommendation accompanied by an online reference form are sent to the applicant’s recommenders once the application has been submitted.

 

Transcripts

The minimum GPA is a 3.0 for applicants applying to the Master of Architecture program. We require one copy of the official, confidential transcript from each institution (undergraduate and graduate) that you have attended. These transcripts are an essential piece of your application. Send transcripts from any institution where you earned (or will earn) a degree, studied for one year or more, or took classes that relate to your current application for graduate study. Transcripts should be in confidential, signed-across-the-seal envelopes provided to you by the registrar of each institution. It is critical that the transcripts be in confidential envelopes. Personal copies of your records, or copies which have passed through your hands and are therefore not confidential, are not acceptable and will not be regarded as official. If your school will not provide you directly with a confidential copy of your transcript, then you must have them send an official copy directly to the School of Architecture. Be sure to have them send the transcripts to the attention of The Rice University School of Architecture. You may also wish to upload an unofficial copy, for information purposes only, in the online application; however you must still provide an official, confidential transcript. We must also receive certification of degrees received, including the date the degree was awarded. This information may be included on the final transcript.

Note Concerning Transcripts of Foreign Applicants:The academic records which we refer to as transcripts should provide a listing, year-by-year, of all courses taken and the grade or marks received for each one. It is helpful to have the grading scale of the institution and the student’s rank in class included when such information is available. Do not submit secondary school records. Transcripts must bear an official signature in ink of the appropriate official of your institution(s), such as the registrar or recorder of records, and must bear the institutional seal. If your college or university will not provide original official academic documents, exact copies that have been verified as “Certified True Copies” by the appropriate institutional official of each institution that you have attended should be sent. Uncertified photocopies are not acceptable. To be considered, all documents not in English must be accompanied by official English translations. These translations must bear an original ink signature and seal, and translations alone will not be acceptable.

 

GRE Scores

Rice University requires all applicants to provide GRE (Graduate Record Examination) General Test scores. The scores must not be more than five years old, and an official copy must be sent to Rice University directly from the Educational Testing Service. Personal copies are not acceptable. More information on test score requirements can be found here.

Institution Code and School Name: 6609 – Rice University; Department Code: 4401.

Rice University receives GRE scores electronically from the Educational Testing Service. Because we match scores by an applicant’s name, it is important that you explicitly call our attention to any discrepancies that might occur between your name as reported on your application forms and as recorded on your GRE scores. Be sure to take the GRE in time for official scores to reach us by the December 31st deadline. For further information on the GRE and registration forms, please contact the Educational Testing Service, P.O. Box 6000, Princeton, New Jersey 08541-6000 USA or telephone             (609) 771-7670      . Send e-mail to gre-info@ets.org or visit the GRE web site.

Note about GRE Scores for Foreign Applicants: We realize that language and cultural differences may affect the GRE scores of foreign students, particularly whose native language is not English. This is taken into consideration when such students’ applications are evaluated. The scores are nevertheless required and must come directly from the Educational Testing Service.

 

Portfolio

The portfolio for M Arch Option 1 students should contain examples of visual creativity (freehand drawings, photographs, etc. in a format other than slides). A portfolio of previous design work is mandatory for applicants for the M Arch Options 2 and 3.

Two identical versions of a portfolio of an applicant’s creative work are required. A hard-copy version must be sent directly to the School. A second identical version must be uploaded to the online application. Both versions must be received by December 31. Hard-copy portfolios must not exceed 9”x12”. Oversize portfolios, discs or videos will not be accepted. One digital version must be uploaded in pdf format as a single document no larger than 15 MB. The file name must list the program, option, last name, first name, portfolio; each field separated by an underscore (“_”). File naming example: March_Option1_Smith_Jane_Portfolio.pdf

Portfolios should be mailed directly to:
Rice University
School of Architecture MS-50
P.O. Box 1892
Houston, TX 77251-1892

If sent by Express Mail:
Rice University
School of Architecture MS-50
6100 Main Street
Houston, TX 77005-1892

 

Personal Statement

Your application and all supporting documents help us know your work, your goals, and your abilities as a future architect. Your personal statement should include information about your professional goals and discuss your architectural interests.

 

TOEFL Requirement (for Foreign Applicants)

The Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL) is required of any student whose native language is not English. Your score must not be more than two years old and an official copy must be sent to the Graduate School directly from ETS. The test is administered through the Educational Testing Service, Box 6151, Princeton, New Jersey 08541-6151 USA , telephone             (609) 771-7100      , e-mail toefl@ets.org or at a center in your native country.

Institution Code and School Name: 6609 – Rice University; Department Code: 12.

Much of your success in graduate study in the United States will rest on your ability to understand, read, write, and speak English. If English is not your native language, evidence of proficiency in its use will be decisive in the review for admission.

Applicants whose native language is not English must take the TOEFL test and score at least 600 on the paper-based TOEFL, score at least 250 on the computer-based TOEFL, or score 100 on the Internet-based TOEFL. For students who choose to take the IELTS in lieu of TOEFL, the minimum score is 7.

If a student’s English skills are deemed to be deficient, we maintain the ability to require that he/she enroll in an ESL program in advance of enrollment to bring their proficiency up to a minimum standard. Students may also be required to take a follow-up English language course during their first year of graduate study.

Interview Policy for Language Proficiency

Once an application is completed, the admissions committee may request an evaluative interview to further determine English proficiency. Interviews are by invitation only after all materials have been received and initially reviewed.

If the admissions committee is requesting an interview, you will be contacted via e-mail. It is the responsibility of the applicant to confirm the appointment. Appointments which have not been confirmed will not be honored.

 

Option Selection

Please submit a separate sheet of paper indicating specifically the program to which you will be applying and include this sheet with your portfolio.

Option 1: For students with a BS or BA degree but with little or no architectural training.
Option 2: For students with a BS or BA degree in Architecture (minimum of four undergraduate design studios).
Option 3: For students with a Bachelor of Architecture professional degree.

 

Questions

If you have questions about the application process, contact Lauren Neatherlin, Graduate Coordinator:
Email: arch-gradapp@rice.edu; Phone:             (713) 348-5202      .

Please also refer to The Office of Graduate and Postdoctoral Studies for general information about graduate application and life at Rice.

 

 

Rhode Island School of Design, Division of Architecture & Design

Two College Street
Providence, RI 02903
United StatesMain Phone:             401-454-6281
Fax: 401-454-6299
E-mail: archdept@risd.edu
Web site: http://www.risd.edu/Architecture/
Kyna Leski

Freshman Applicants

DEADLINES

Early Decision – November 1
Regular Decision – February 1

Our application deadlines for entrance in 2012 have now passed. Students interested in applying for entrance in 2013 can start their application here beginning on September 1, 2012.

CREDENTIALS

All prospective applicants are urged to follow a college preparatory program in secondary school, taking courses in studio art and art history where possible. Graduation from secondary school is a prerequisite, although in certain cases a high school equivalency diploma may be accepted. Candidates for the Bachelor of Architecture degree must have completed two semesters of algebra, one semester of trigonometry, and one year of science (preferably physics). Courses that develop visual and design skills, such as studio drawing, are strongly recommended.

Academic Transcripts
Applicants must provide official secondary school transcripts of all academic work accomplished through their most recent grading period. If you are attending school in another country, all of your academic credentials must be translated into English by an approved translator.

Drawings
Two drawing samples are required of all candidates. Your first drawing must reference a bicycle. Your second drawing should be chosen from this list of options:

  • In the course of a single calendar day, draw 25 related images in a single visualization
  • Visualize the invisible
  • A drawing that uses both sides of the sheet of paper
  • An image of water, from an observed body of water.  It should include the following: something visible from the bottom, something floating under the surface, something alive, things floating on the surface, the reflection of sky, the reflection of something terrestrial (structure or person), water surface patterns or rhythms (from wind), light on the surface of the water, light coming from underneath the water, and hierarchy (both tiny to large and crowded to open).

Each drawing must be done on a sheet of white paper measuring 16″ x 20″ (40 cm x 50 cm). Your bicycle drawing must be done using graphite pencil. For your second drawing sample, you may use graphite pencil or any dry (fixable) medium, a water-based medium (such as acrylic, ink, watercolor or gouache) or a combination of these media. Do not, however, use any oil-based medium, or collage, for your second drawing and remember that whatever medium(s) you choose for this drawing, you must be able to fold the paper to mail it to our office.

You may approach these two drawings in any way you wish. For example, your drawings may be abstract expressions or representational observations; you may choose to draw an object alone or place it in a situation; you may choose to cover the entire surface of the page or only a small portion of it, etc. Other than the stated requirements related to paper size (16″ x 20″), subject (i.e., bicycle) and medium (graphite pencil), everything and anything else are up to you.

These drawings must be submitted in their original form, not as reproductions. Fold your drawings in half and then in half again to a finished size of 8″ x 10″ (20cm x 25cm) and be sure to note your full name and address on the back of each drawing.

An important thought: we consider drawing to be as much about process as presentation, so we encourage you to consider your drawing submissions as exercises in experimental thinking and risk-taking more than final presentations or examples of technical proficiency. We encourage you to consider the full range of possible expression in your submissions, as we do not value any particular style of drawing more than another. Finally, using photographs as a source for your drawings is not recommended.

Portfolio
Your portfolio should consist of 12 to 20 examples of any type of two- or three dimensional work you have completed recently. We suggest that the work reflect your ideas, interests, experience and abilities in the arts to date. It may be in any media, may be finished or in sketch form, and may be the result of an assigned class project or a self-directed exploration. We strongly suggest that as part of this visual presentation you also reproduce and submit 2-3 pages from your journal or sketchbook to indicate your process of research, thinking or investigation.

Your portfolio must be reproduced and may be submitted using Slideroom, an online portfolio submission service; as digital image files on a CD or DVD; or as unmounted digital or photographic prints (no larger than 8.5″ x 11″ or 21.5cm x 28cm each). Detailed instructions for using Slideroom are available on the site (risd.slideroom.com). Slideroom charges $10 for using this submission option.

If you choose to send your portfolio directly to RISD on a CD/DVD, each image should be submitted as a separate file in .jpg format. Individual files should not exceed 3MB. Do not combine images in a prepared presentation or slideshow of any type (e.g., PowerPoint or Keynote). Please be sure to include a printed thumbnail page showing all the images submitted digitally. Time-based work or performance pieces may be submitted as QuickTime or .mpg files on a CD or DVD.

Whichever format you select, include a work description sheet. Number the examples you are submitting and on your description page list the corresponding number, medium, size, date of completion and title for each work. It is very important that your full name and address be clearly noted on each CD, DVD, print, description and thumbnail page submitted.

Writing Samples
Submit two examples of writing, each between 200 and 400 words. Your first sample should address, “What is the most important thing you hope will have happened to you as a result of your time in the RISD community?”

Your second sample should be chosen from this list of options:

  • Every day we’re confronted by circumstances that range from the worrisome to the inspiring. What do you find most compelling in the world right now? How might this impact our future? What influence can you have on this situation?
  • Create a short piece of fiction, in the form of a story, essay, poem or other genre.
  • Is there something you love, have to do, can’t stop thinking about? Write about a personal passion or obsession other than visual art or design.
  • A rubber ball, two inches in diameter. Make a list of 50 things you could do with this ball. OK, let’s be reasonable, 25 would be good. OK, final offer, make a list of things, length of the list up to you… and the length of the list is not the most important thing, is it?

While we encourage you to adhere to the rules of good writing, we look for applicants who are not afraid to take risks in their expression. Please don’t hesitate to use a writing style or method that may be outside the mainstream as you express a dynamic position in the samples you submit.

Letter(s) of Recommendation
Recommendations should be written by teachers or other professionals who have a first-hand knowledge of your art or academic achievements and can comment on your potential as a student. Although not required, these letters can be very helpful in the consideration of your application. One letter is suggested, although as many as three may be submitted.

We strongly suggest that your recommender(s) use our recommendation form (pdf). Recommenders may also use their own stationery, but it is critical that they include your full name in the letter. Recommendations should be sent by the writer directly to the Admissions Office in time to meet the appropriate deadline.

Download recommendation form »

TESTS

SAT Reasoning Test (SAT)
Please be sure to specify RISD (CEEB code no. 3726) as one of the recipients of your score reports. The examinations administered by the American College Testing Program (ACT) may be submitted in place of the SAT (RISD ACT code no. 3812). RISD requires that SAT or ACT scores include the Writing component.

Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL) If English is not your native language, you must submit results from the TOEFL. Proficiency in English is a prerequisite for acceptance and applicants must attain an acceptable score on this test. Different versions of this examination may be available, depending on where you are in the world. We expect a minimum score of 93 on the Internet-Based TOEFL (IBT), which is becoming more widely available. On the paper-based version, which is still in use in some testing centers, we expect a score of 580. Finally, some applicants may have taken the Computer-Based TOEFL (CBT), which uses a different scoring scale; if you took this version of the test, we expect a result of at least 237. You should plan to take the TOEFL well in advance of the application deadline since (depending on the test center location and the test format) it may take six weeks for your scores to be sent to RISD.

International English Language Testing System (IELTS)
Students may choose to submit results from the IELTS in place of the TOEFL. RISD expects a minimum score of 6.5 from an IELTS examination.

BROWN/RISD DUAL DEGREE PROGRAM

Students applying for admission to the dual degree program must complete the application process at both institutions and must do so by our respective deadlines: January 1 for Brown and February 1 for RISD. Students must be admitted both to RISD and Brown before they will be considered for admission to the dual degree program. However, please indicate your interest in this program on your RISD application form. The only additional credential required to apply for this program is the Dual Degree Supplement. A copy of this supplement must be submitted to both Admissions offices as part of your application.

Download Dual Degree Supplement »

SENDING YOUR MATERIALS

Please plan to submit your portfolio, (if not using Slideroom), drawings and writing samples to the Admissions Office together, in one envelope. Transcripts, test scores and recommendations should be sent to the Admissions Office directly by your school, the test agency and your recommender(s).

Admissions Office
Rhode Island School of Design
Two College Street
Providence, RI 02903
USA


Apply Now

RISD’s online application process is relatively quick and easy, with the option of saving an application in process and returning to it later.

online application button

After submitting your application online, please submit your portfolio, (if not using Slideroom), drawings and writing samples together to the Admissions Office in one envelope:

Admissions Office
Rhode Island School of Design
Two College Street
Providence, RI 02903
USA

Your transcripts, test scores and recommendations should be sent directly to the Admissions Office by your school, test agency and recommender(s).

Application form
You may also download a PDF version of the application form to fill out and mail to RISD. Mail your completed application form along with a check or money order (payable to Rhode Island School of Design) for the $60 application fee (non-refundable) to the above address.

Questions can be addressed to:
admissions@risd.edu
phone:             401 454-6300      or
800 364-7473

 

 

Pratt Institute, School of Architecture

200 Willoughby Avenue
Main 1
Brooklyn, NY 11205
United StatesMain Phone:             718-399-4305
Fax: 718-399-4315
E-mail: pgill@pratt.edu
Web site: http://www.pratt.edu/arch/
Thomas Hanrahan, Dean

Applying as an Undergraduate

Spring and Fall 2012

Below are links to our requirements, our online application, and our downloadable application and recommendation or reference  forms. We prefer that students apply online if possible to expedite the processing of applications. Full instructions are found below.  If you’re not sure of your major, read about our programs below.

Questions? Email us at admissions@pratt.edu or check our FAQs.

Spring 12 and Fall 12 Applicants

Undergraduate Programs of Study

Pratt has a wide variety of highly ranked programs (associate’s and bachelor’s ) from which to choose in its three undergraduate schools: School of ArchitectureSchool of Art and Design, and  School of Liberal Arts and Sciences   Students can explore their artistic interests by taking courses in other majors. Students have the option to apply as “undecided” if they are unsure of their major in the School of Art and Design. Students interested in architecture, construction management, fashion, writing, or critical and visual studies must apply to those majors as they have a different first year. The School of Art and Design offers a “foundation year” for all majors but fashion. Below is a list of of programs with links to the departments.  If you’re looking for admissions requirements, they can be found online as well.

Brooklyn Campus

Manhattan Campus

Two-year Programs

Four-Year Programs

Affiliated Programs

PrattMWP in Utica: majors in communications design, fine arts, art education, and photography. Visit PrattMWP online.

DCAD in Delaware: majors in communications design, fine arts, photography, animation, and interior design.  Visit DCAD online.

Recognized internationally for the quality of its programs, faculty, and students, Pratt offers students:

  • A world-class faculty of successful working professionals who ensure the highest professional standards in the classroom while connecting students with internships and eventually jobs.
  • A choice of 27 majors and concentrations in its three schools: architecture , art and design, and liberal arts and sciences.
  • The ideal locations–a beautifully landscaped Brooklyn campus just minutes from Manhattan with historic buildings, tree-lined green spaces, contemporary sculpture park, and outstanding facilities and a Manhattan campus in a recently renovated historic building in Chelsea.  The Brooklyn campus houses all the four-year programs but construction management, which is offered in Manhattan.  The two-year associate’s programs are offered in Manhattan as well.
  • An Outstanding Professional Education: Ranked second nationally for interior design, fourth for industrial design and ninth for architecture byDesignIntelligence (2011).   Students begin their professional studies in the first year–an intensive preparation that is highly valued by the professionals who hire Pratt graduates.

Change of Schools Within Pratt: Pratt current students who wish to transfer from one school to another within the Institute should complete a Change of School Transfer Application and submit it to the Office of Admissions no later than June 1 for the fall term and December 15th for the spring term.  A $50 application fee must accompany the application.  Students must meet the admissions criteria for the program to which they are applying.  See www.pratt.edu/apply for admissions criteria for transfers. Portfolios may be uploaded at https://pratt.slideroom.com under the heading Undergraduate, put on a CD or printed out and submitted with the application.   Credit transferred to the new program from either Pratt or other colleges is not computed in the new grade point average.  If the transfer is approved, your form will be sent to the Registrar’s Office for an evaluation of your transfer credit.  A limit of one transfer between schools will be considered. Students requesting a second transfer will be required to obtain additional approval from both deans and the Office of the Provost.

 

 

Ranked one of the top design schools by Businessweek.

Applying as a Graduate Student

Pratt offers graduate programs in its three schools: Art and Design, Architecture, and Information and Library Science.  Beginning in fall 2013, the School of Liberal Arts and Sciences will offer a graduate Media Studies program.

Pratt has a large graduate program with 1600 graduate students.   Students work closely with faculty and visiting critics throughout the development of their thesis work. The expertise of Pratt’s world renowned faculty — all practicing professionals in their respective fields — guides the experience of graduate students, who are accepted to Pratt through a selective admissions process. The diverse graduate programs are enriched by annual visits by many distinguished visiting artists, scholars and guest critics. Pratt’s location just 25 minutes from Manhattan is ideal for its students, providing access to New York’s riches, but also enabling Pratt to hire successful practicing artists, architects, lecturers  to teach and to participate in visiting artist/lecturer programs.  The connections students make with the professional world through their faculty are invaluable.  In addition, the Career Services Department provides job placement services for a graduate’s lifetime.

Graduate Information Sessions

Each department hosts two information sessions a year in the fall.  The schedule is available online beginning in late August.  The graduate architecture and urban design programs offer an Accepted Student Reception in the spring (typically in March).

Graduate applicants are invited to tour the Brooklyn campus by contacting our visit coordinator at visit@pratt.edu.  Campus tour information is available online.  Manhattan program applicants must contact the academic department to request a tour/meeting or attend a graduate information session in Manhattan. .

 

Applying to Pratt

Pratt offers two primary semesters for entrance, fall and spring, as well as a summer entrance for the post professional architecture and urban design programs and library science.

Spring and Fall 2012: Applications for spring and fall 2012 are posted online.

DEADLINES FOR GRADUATE PROGRAMS: As of January 14th, 2012, Pratt is still accepting applications for its graduate programs.  Some programs have final deadlines of March. Others are even later. Please check the individual deadlines at this link.

Applying to Pratt

All applicants to graduate programs at Pratt must have received a bachelor’s degree from an institution in the United States that is accredited by a recognized regional association or have been awarded the equivalent of the bachelor’s degree from an international institution of acceptable standards by the term in which they plan to enroll.  .

All applicants must read both the general application requirements and departmental requirements at the links below or on the left.

  1. General application requirements
  2. Departmental requirements
  3. Graduate students are required to apply online after reviewing all requirements.

Graduate Program Rankings : Pratt’s graduate programs are among the top ranked programs in the country. Check out the rankings of Pratt’s programs.

Student Gallery: View graduate student work in our admissions gallery.  Select the program underneath the large gallery.

Pratt’s Graduate Degrees : Listing of graduate programs
Ask a question 
and receive an answer immediately.

Pratt Graduate Admissions mailing address:

Pratt Institute
Office of Graduate Admissions, Myrtle Hall 2nd floor
200 Willoughby Avenue,
Brooklyn, NY 11205

Pratt’s Graduate Interior Design program is ranked number one in the country by US News and World Reports and DesignIntelligence….

Contact Us

Email us at admissions@pratt.edu
Email the Director of Graduate Admissions directly at yhah@pratt.edu
Call us at 718636-3514 or             1800 331-0834
Become a fan on Facebook and find out more about Pratt.
Follow us on Twitter.

 

 

Massachusetts Institute of Technology, School of Architecture and Planning

Dept of Architecture, Bldg. 7, 7-337
77 Massachusetts Avenue
Cambridge, MA 02139-4307
United StatesMain Phone:             617-253-7791
Fax: 617-253-8993
E-mail: darrenb@MIT.EDU
Web site: http://architecture.mit.edu/
Nader Tehrani, Faculty – Professor and Head of Department

Undergraduate Admissions

Students who wish to study architecture at MIT at the undergraduate level must first be accepted to MIT. At the end of the first year MIT students decide which course of study they wish to pursue. Undergraduate applicants do not apply directly to the Department. They will use the MIT central admissions application, but should also send a copy of their portfolios directly to the Department, attention “Undergraduate Admissions.”

Additional information and instructions for undergraduate applicants are available in the MIT Admissions website:

http://mitadmissions.org

Graduate Admissions

All graduate admissions are processed within the Department of Architecture. However, specific procedures and requirements vary depending on the degree program and discipline. As noted above, this section gives only general guidelines. Applicants should follow instructions detailed under the degree program of their interest.

Deadline and Submission

 

The application deadline is December 15. All application material must be received by deadline, with the exception of portfolios, which might be submitted by January 3. Late applications will not be reviewed. It is the responsibility of the applicant to be sure that the completed application forms and all supporting materials are at the following address by the deadline.

  • MIT Department of Architecture
  • Attn: Admissions
  • 77 Massachusetts Ave., Room 7-337
  • Cambridge, MA 02139-4307
  • Telephone:             (617) 715-4490

 

Online Application

Although we accept paper-based applications, we strongly prefer that all graduate programs applicants use the MIT graduate application website. Online applications are processed through CollegeNet.

http://web.mit.edu/admissions/graduate

Application Fee

Application to MIT requires a non-refundable fee of $75 USD.

Recommendations

All applicants must submit at least three letters of recommendation. Recommenders may submit their letters through CollegeNet as well.

Transcripts

Transcripts must be requested as original documents from your previous schools. Transcripts may be forwarded by the applicant if they are in the original, sealed envelope. Non-English transcripts must be translated into English, and if necessary, signed by a licensed notary and accompanied by the original version.

Statement of Objectives

Research our faculty members and the work they are doing. Make note of the work you find interesting in your personal statement. A match between your academic pursuits and the work performed here is important.

English Proficiency Requirement

IELTS/TOEFL scores are required for EVERY applicant whose first language is not English. There are no exceptions. Previous education in English will not suffice. Check English Proficiency Requirement under the degree of your interest for specific information on minimum scores.

Graduate Record Examination (GRE)

Some degree programs require GRE scores, but not all of them. There is no minimum score. ONLY the General Test is required (Verbal, Quantitative, and Analytical). You DO NOT have to take any subject tests.

Portfolios

Many of our degrees require that you submit a non-returnable portfolio, including for those applicants who do not have a previous architecture degree or background. The portfolio should include evidence of recent creative work: personal, academic and/or professional. Choose what you care about, what you think is representative of your best work, and what is expressive of you. Written material (articles or papers) may be included with the application, and are particularly appropriate for the PhD programs. Portfolio requirements vary by program. Be sure to review the portfolio requirements specific to the program to which you are applying. After the application process is complete, portfolios for those not accepted will be shredded.

Resumes / CVs

Resumes / CVs are not required. If you must submit a CV, please include it as a page in your portfolio. There is no place to upload a copy of your CV, and we will not forward paper copies to the admissions committees. They will be destroyed if not part of the portfolio.

Interviews

An interview is not required for application but are recommended for all the PhD programs, the Master of Science in Art Culture and Technology (SMACT) and Master of Science in Building Technology programs (SMBT).

Reapplying

Students who wish to reapply should contact the Department to let us know. We save applications for two years, but not portfolios. Applicants should use the online application system to submit a new application. We will retrieve your previous transcripts, recommendation letters and test scores and combine them with your new materials. Plan to update any documents that may have changed, such as test scores or transcripts. If possible, include one new letter of recommendation to show the admissions committee that you are actively reapplying.

Contact

Admissions coordinator:

  • Telephone:             (617) 715-4490

Iowa State University, Department of Architecture

146 College of Design
Ames, IA 50011-3093
United StatesMain Phone:             515-294-2557
Fax: 515-294-1440
E-mail: jholt@iastate.edu
Web site: http://www.design.iastate.edu
Gregory Palermo, Interim Director

College of Design

Mark C. Engelbrecht, Dean
Kate Schwennsen, Associate Dean
Timothy O. Borich, Associate Dean
www.design.iastate.edu

Departments of the College

Architecture
Art and Design
Community and Regional Planning
Landscape Architecture

Objectives of the Curricula in Design

The College of Design is among a small, elite number of comprehensive design schools offering outstanding opportunities for both disciplinary and interdisciplinary education.
The College of Design strives to provide each student with a broad educational background and preparation in a specific environmental design or art discipline. Each program is designed to develop knowledge and appreciation of the physical and cultural environment, to stimulate creative thinking and analysis, and to prepare students for participation in a wide variety of careers.
The college’s programs also encompass many opportunities for individualized study and extracurricular activities such as visiting lectures and symposia, workshops, gallery exhibits, practicum and internship programs, field trips, and international study programs.
Graduates of the college are employed in private firms, government, industry, and education, or are self-employed as designers or artists. Opportunities for graduates include careers as architects, landscape architects, community and regional planners, graphic designers, interior designers, studio artists, arts administrators and environmental designers.

Graduate Curricula

The College of Design offers graduate study in the areas shown below. Graduate study is conducted through the Graduate College. Details are found in the Graduate College section of this catalog.

Majors
Architecture
Architectural Studies
Art and Design
Community and Regional Planning
Graphic Design
Integrated Visual Arts
Interior Design
Landscape Architecture
Transportation*

Double Degree Programs
Architecture / Business
Architecture / Community and
Regional Planning
Community and Regional Planning /
Landscape Architecture
Community and Regional Planning/
Public Administration

Minor
Gerontology*
*The College of Design participates in this interdepartmental graduate program.

Undergraduate Curricula

Majors
Architecture
Art and Design
Community and Regional Planning
Graphic Design
Interior Design
Integrated Studio Arts
Landscape Architecture
Secondary Majors
Environmental Studies*
International Studies*

Minors
Design Studies
Digital Media
Entrepreneurial Studies*
Environmental Studies*
Gerontology*
International Studies*
Technology and Social Change*

*The College of Design participates in these interdepartmental secondary majors and minors.

Organization of Curricula

The undergraduate curricula in design are divided into two phases: a pre-professional Core Design Program and a professional program. The Core Design Program grounds the undergraduate degree programs, provides a rich, rigorous inclusive base for the curricula. It creates shared language, experience, and community for programs, faculty and students and exposes students to all design disciplines, allowing them to make more informed degree choices, apply to multiple programs, and experiment with interdisciplinary work.

For students entering the Core Design Program, the college highly recommends purchase of a digital camera.

The intense, discipline-specific professional curricula that follow the Core focus on developing students’ ability and knowledge in their major. Within the major area, students advance creative and professional skills through classroom and studio work, critiques of student projects, discussion with professional practitioners, and field studies.

General education, contained in both the Core and the professional programs, is composed to insure that students receive a well-rounded undergraduate education.

High School Preparation

Courses in fine arts and design that develop visualization and freehand drawing abilities are highly recommended through not required for entrance. Students planning to enroll in an academic program in the College of Design must complete the following high school requirements: 4 years of English, including coursework in composition and literature and up to 1 year of speech and/or journalism, to develop communication skills and critical reading/writing ability; 3 years of mathematics to develop problem solving skills, including 1 year each of algebra, geometry, and advanced algebra; 3 years of science, including at least two of the following: 1 year of biology, 1 year of chemistry, or 1 year of physics; 2 years of social studies, including at least 1 year of U.S. history and 1 semester of U.S. government.

Admission Standards to Enrollment Managed Professional Programs

Admission into the enrollment managed professional programs of Architecture, Community and Regional Planning, Graphic Design, Interior Design, and Landscape Architecture requires a separate application after completing the Core Design Program, depends on available resources, and is subject to review by faculty committee. Applicants are reviewed on the basis of a portfolio of original work, scholarship performance, and a written essay.

Advising

Each student receives personal assistance from an academic advisor within the student’s curriculum area. Students enrolled in the college’s Core Design Program are advised by professional advisers. Once admitted to professional programs, students are assigned to faculty advisers. Advisers help students develop a program of study, access pertinent university resources as well as provide information on career choice.

The college’s career services office works with students to develop their career goals as well as prepare and search for employment.

Honors Program

The College of Design participates in the Honors Program which provides opportunities for outstanding students to individualize their programs of study. See Index, Honors Program.

Requirements in the College of Design

All students in the College of Design are expected to meet the following requirements of the college.

Core Design Program
Cr. Fall/Spring
4 Dsn S 102
4 Dsn S 131
3 Dsn S 183
6 Social Science/Humanities Electives*
6 Math/Science Electives**
6 English 150/250
0.5 Library 160
29.5 **
* General education credits in the Core Design Program may count toward the minimum credits.
** Students applying to Architecture for admission must take Math 142 and Physics 111 in the first year. These two courses total seven credits for a total of 30.5 core credits.
General Education
Minimum Credits.
6 Biological sciences, physical sciences and mathematics
Includes courses in the fields of agronomy, astronomy and astrophysics, biology, botany, chemistry, civil engineering, computer science, geology, mathematics, physics, statistics, and zoology.
9.5 Communications
Engl 150*, 250*, Lib 160. Includes courses in the fields of English (composition), and speech communication (interpersonal and rhetorical).
6 Humanities
Includes courses in the fields of classical studies, English (literature), foreign languages, history, philosophy, religious studies, as well as history/theory/literature courses in dance, music, theater, journalism, African American studies, American Indian studies, environmental studies, Latino/a studies, womens studies, and university studies.
6 Social sciences
Includes courses in the fields of African American studies, American Indian studies, anthropology, economics, environmental studies, geography, human development and family studies, Latino/a studies, political science, psychology, sociology, and womens studies.
9 Additional credit hours selected from any of the above areas.
Six credits must be at the 300 level or above.
9 Selected from the above areas.
Six credits must be at the 300 level or above.
36.5 Minimum credits
See departmental curricula for specific course requirements within the general education areas.
*To meet requirements for graduation, a minimum grade of C must be received.

Minor in Design Studies

The undergraduate minor in Design Studies is constructed to facilitate design awareness among interested students and to provide a vehicle for interdisciplinary study within the College of Design. This minor is open to all undergraduate students at Iowa State University.

This minor requires fifteen credits of course work: three credits of history selected form College of Design course offerings and twelve additional credits selected from College of Design course offerings.

At least six of the fifteen credits must be taken at Iowa State University in courses numbered 300 or above. At least nine of the fifteen credits must not be used to meet any other college or university requirements except the credit requirement for graduation.

Students enrolled in the College of Design may not use courses in their major or in the Core Design Program to satisfy this minor.

Minor in Digital Media

Manipulation of digital media has emerged as an essential skill for design inquiry alongside traditional methods of building models and drawing sketches. To familiarize students with the use of digital media in the design process, the College of Design offers an undergraduate Minor in Digital Media. This minor is open to all undergraduate students at Iowa State University.

This minor requires 15 credits, including at least 6 credits taken at Iowa State University in courses numbered 300 or above. The minor must include at least 9 credits that are not used to meet any other department, college, or university requirement; and at least 3 credits from the listed courses numbered 200. Courses taken for this minor may not be taken on a pass-not pass basis.

Students enrolled in the College of Design may not use courses in their major or in the Core Design Program to satisfy this minor.